TwitPic, Google, CIA, More: Brief Afternoon Buzz, September 19th, 2014

(Happy Talk Like a Pirate Day, Mateys!)

Twitter is getting more like Facebook and now apparently Facebook is getting more like Twitter. I’m not too chuffed about either of those things. “Facebook wants to steal discussion of real-time events from Twitter and stop being perceived as a slow social network. So today it announced News Feed changes that will surface posts that mention Trending Topics sooner and higher in the feed.”

Ready to upgrade to iOS 8? It’s a huge download. Here’s how to handle it.

TwitPic has been acquired and will soldier on.

The CIA has posted hundreds of declassified journal articles. “The documents, posted on the agency’s website Thursday, are from ‘Studies in Intelligence,’ the CIA’s in-house professional journal. The publication’s mission is ‘to stimulate within the Intelligence Community the constructive discussion of important issues of the day, to expand knowledge of lessons learned from past experiences, to increase understanding of the history of the profession, and to provide readers with considered reviews of public literature concerning intelligence,’ the agency said.”

The Loeb Classical Library has gone digital (but it’ll cost you.) Hat tip to @LibraryStuff.

Google’s going to be showing you a lot more photos. “Abby from Google quietly announced in the Google Maps Help forum that those who share photos publicly and have location data on the photos within Google+ may find their photos automatically within Google Views and Photo Sphere.”

Yahoo is going on the road. Good afternoon, Internet…

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Yahoo, Kindle, Music, Mathematica, More: Evening Buzz, September 17th, 2014

Bing is predicting the Scotland independence vote.

Lifehacker links to a huge list of how to close over 60 online accounts. This list was apparently put together for shutting down accounts when someone passes away, but don’t feel like you need to wait for that unhappy event to dump the account of your choice.

From Greenbot: How to use Google Voice with the new Hangouts app.

The British Library will digitize fifty more Malay manuscripts.

Apparently your Kindle is vulnerable to hacking by dodgy ebooks. And by “hacking,” I mean, “Your account gets stolen.” Amazon, tell me again why you don’t offer two-factor?

There’s a Twitter bot out there that can make music recommendations for you.

Law.gov is making available more international law information. “The archived information includes English language summaries of laws, regulations, and related legal instruments that in turn link to the full-text PDFs that are in the official language(s) of the country. Legal items from the gazettes of the following countries are now available under the ‘Legislative’ sources list for each jurisdiction: Brazil, Canada, Democratic Republic of Congo, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Haiti, Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Mexico, Mauritania, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Taiwan, Tunisia, and United States.”

Wolfram|Alpha has launched a cloud-based version of Mathematica. “It’s a notebook interface, just like on the desktop. You interactively build up a computable document, mixing text, code, graphics, and so on—with inputs you can immediately run, hierarchies of cells, and even things like Manipulate.”

More security updates for Adobe Reader and Acrobat! Patch patch patch!

Yahoo has launched a new Yahoo Developer Network Web site. Good evening, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Minecraft, Egypt, EBSCO, More: Quick Afternoon Buzz, September 116th, 2014

Microsoft bought the Minecraft company. And while I’m very happy those folks made bank – they’ve earned it – I worry about the future of the game.

Dropbox has released a transparency report. “Dropbox received 268 requests for user information from law enforcement agencies in the first half of 2014, the company has revealed in its updated transparency report.”

Web browsing via text message? Why not. If you’re old like me you’ll remember all the services that let you access the Web by e-mail ages ago. (And do Gopher, FTP, etc. Check this out for memory lane: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/internet-services/access-via-email/ )

Is Google not putting malware warnings on search results that appear due to an ad purchase? This is kind of disturbing.

More Google: Google Maps has more Street View images of Egypt.

So if you have iTunes, you got the new U2 album whether you wanted it or not. Now Apple is offering a tool to remove it.

EBSCO has launched two magazine archives. “Libraries can own the 20th century collections of two of the leading business magazines now that the complete backfiles for Forbes and Bloomberg Businessweek are available from EBSCO Information Services.”

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Apps, GPO, GIFs, More: Morning Buzz, September 11th, 2014

From an archiving point of view — physical diaries versus digital calendars. This is “diaries” in the British sense… I think we’d say “appointment books” here in the US.

Like something you see on Google Hangouts? Now you can applaud.

The first digital library from the GPO depository program has gone live in North Dakota. “The library, part of North Dakota’s Sitting Bull College servicing the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation community, ‘is opting to meet their community’s needs by developing an online government information collection,’ a release from the GPO said. ‘In choosing this format, the library will not receive print materials from GPO.'”

Google Hangouts now offers free voice calls. “Starting today you can make voice calls from Hangouts on Android, iOS and the web. It’s free to call other Hangouts users, it’s free to call numbers in the U.S. and Canada, and the international rates are really low. So keeping in touch is easier and more affordable than ever.”

Adobe and Microsoft have both pushed out a bunch of critical fixes — get patchin’ y’all!

Well, crap. There’s been a leak of 5 million GMail names and passwords. Based on an article in The Mary Sue, however, looks like this data might be pretty old. Still… turned on 2-factor lately?

The state of Florida has created an online database of prison deaths. “The database lists inmates by name, prison, race and manner of death, and supplies other details that the Miami Herald had been trying to obtain from the department since May, when the newspaper began a series of articles about prison deaths.”

Wow! Check out these animated GIFs made from archival photos at the Library of Congress. Creeeeepy.

Facebook is apparently testing a feature that lets you schedule the deletion of your posts in advance.

Can you imagine getting coupons or other promotional material based on predicted behavior? Using tweets and other data to forecast behavior. “Some people are very careful about what data they give out, but the algorithms can work pretty well with anonymized data. Usable predictions can be made more than 60 percent of the time, if the right data are aggregated. And that data isn’t just coming from social media: Think about sources such as credit card transactions, monitored telephone calls, e-mail, GPS data.”

From Hongkiat: 10 Handy Pinterest Tools for Business.

CTIA has tested 1,000 apps for KnowMyApp.org (PRESS RELEASE). “Launched in December 2013, KnowMyApp.org informs customers how much data their favorite apps use before they download them while also providing app developers with resources to build more data-efficient apps. Testing the top paid and free apps from both the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores as well app submissions directly from developers, Intertek, the leading quality solutions provider to industries worldwide, tests and provides information to consumers on: How the app was tested; How much data is used when downloaded, when opened initially, during active run time and background time; How the app impacts data plans (i.e., 300MB, 1GB, 2GB and 4GB); and How users can conserve data usage.” Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Apple, Partpic, Astronomy, More: Afternoon Buzz, September 10th, 2014

(Hearing from a lot of y’all that Bloglines is down, but I can’t get any info as to why as I write this. If you’ve got the skinny send me a note.)

Want to see all the videos Apple played during its live event yesterday? Here ya go.

You should not be surprised by this: social media apps have data leaks. “Researchers from the University of New Haven have uncovered a mixed bag of security issues involving the Android apps of a number of popular social media sites including Instagram, Vine, Nimbuzz, OoVoo and Voxer, just to name a few.”

Oh wow, Partpic sounds like a great idea. “Are your thingamobs broken? Did the knob fall off of your widget? Partpic has you covered. The company, which is launching at the TC Startup Battlefield in San Francisco, was created to allow consumers to snap a picture of a replacement part and immediately receive a part number and order page in return.”

Hmm: tracking biometrics with Google Glass.

Yup, Home Depot got hacked. Krebs has the serious lowdown.

Interested in astronomy? Join the crowdsourced effort to transcribe log books! “We need to transcribe more than 100 logbooks containing about 10,000 pages of text. We seek volunteers to type in a few numbers per line of text onto web-based forms, since optical character recognition (OCR) doesn’t work on these hand-written entries. Harvard is partnering with the Smithsonian Transcription Center to recruit digital volunteers.” (Thanks to Matt S. for the heads-up!)

Cornell University is undertaking two large digitizing projects. (Glacier images and Latin American journals!)

The Israel Antiques Authority has launched an online museum. “In a statement, the IAA said the site will feature some 2,500 rare artifacts, representing ‘the most important archaeological collections in the Middle East.'” Good afternoon, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

IoT, Maps, Group Study, More: Morning Buzz, September 10th, 2014

Did you get to watch the Apple livestream yesterday? If you didn’t, you didn’t miss anything; it was a real clusterpuddle. Here’s a roundup from Wired.

Speaking of Apple, it has lowered its iCloud pricing.

Wondering what the Internet of Things is all about? IEEE has you covered (press release). “The IEEE IoT eNewsletter is a bi-monthly, technically focused online publication that highlights important, current IoT-related technology developments, innovations, and trends from the world’s top subject matter experts, researchers and practitioners.” A Webinar series is starting too.

Malicious advertising is showing up on big Web sites. (Warning! PC World!) “When encountered, the malicious advertisements cause a person to be redirected to a different website, which triggers a download based on whether the computer is running Windows or Apple’s OS X, wrote Armin Pelkmann, a threat researcher.”

Mapperz hipped me to this online translater for GIS data. “The Easy Translator is available as a free web service, for immediately translating data into your required format and coordinate system.”

Speaking of maps, Larry Ferlazzo has an overview of easy map making site Heganoo.

MMmmkay: Amazon has launched a drone store.

Bloomberg is helping museums and other cultural institutions go digital. “Today, we announced the expansion and rebranding of Bloomberg Connects (formerly known as the Digital Engagement Initiative), which provides funding for cultural institutions to enhance the visitor experiences and increase access to culture using innovative technology tools.”

Do you remember the Ellis Island Passenger Search site? It’s gotten an extensive revamp and more records.

From Hongkiat: 5 Useful Tools for Online Group Study.

The Jerwood Library of the Performing Arts has joined the Flickr Commons. “Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance is the UK’s only conservatoire of music and contemporary dance. The Jerwood Library of the Performing Arts supports the music faculty of the college and contains a small but important collection of special collections and archives. The majority of this collection relates to the former Trinity College of Music (founded in 1872), its staff and students.”

Archiving challenge: What does Duke University do with 12,000 VHS tapes? Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Greek Manuscripts, Downtown Atlanta, Craigslist, More: Big Buzz, September 9th, 2014

Want to keep up with the big Apple news today? Yahoo’s got you covered.

Google has launched the School of YouTube. “The School of YouTube will see many of your favorite YouTube stars learn or teach something new. From figure-skating to salsa dancing, baking a cake to landing a plane, you’ll be able to watch a whole range of weird and wonderful lessons during the week of September 8 to 12.”

The British Library has put another 44 Greek manuscripts online.

Speaking of British, FamilySearch is doing a free Webinar for British Isles research.

From Greenbot, for all your returning students: manage your school day with Google Now.

It’s amazing and a bit scary to learn that just five gangs in Nigeria are behind most Craigslist buyer scams. “Five Nigerian criminal gangs are behind most scams targeting sellers on Craigslist, and they’ve taken new measures to make their swindles appear legitimate, according to a new study.” (Warning! PC World!)

Now you can visit the “Destiny” universe via Google Street View.

How-To Geek has a beginner’s article on creating using virtual machines.

Want to boot Google Glass and similar devices off your WiFi network? There’s a gadget for that (or there will be soon, anyway.)

The Georgia State Library has digitized a small collection of glass plate negatives of downtown Atlanta circa 1927. “The collection of nearly 100 images consists of downtown Atlanta storefronts and streets before the viaduct construction of 1927-1929. Later, some of these covered streets became part of what is now known as Underground Atlanta.”

This is interesting: Google Chrome is testing a more visible in-browser password generator.

More Google: Google has settled with another group over its Google Books program. “The agreement, reached late last week, is with a group of photographers, including the American Society of Media Photographers Inc., and settles charges filed in 2010 that Google’s scanning project was copyright infringement.”

Twitter has officially begun testing a “Buy” button. “The button will roll out to a select group of users first before being introduced more broadly. The initial sellers range from brands like Burberry and The Home Depot to artists like Ryan Adams and Megadeth.” Hmm… Home Depot?

Facebook video appears to be getting really popular, but I’m a bit cynical about how video “likes” are counted. “This spring, those clips started ramping up, because Facebook changed its algorithm to start showing more videos to people who like videos. But Facebook doesn’t require you to actively ‘engage’ with a video — by turning on the sound, or sharing it, or anything else — to decide that you like videos. All it needs you to do is watch a portion of the clip — Facebook won’t say out loud how long that is — without scrolling past.” Uh-huh.

Bing launched the Image Widget Tool, Getty sued, and now the Image Widget Tool is offline. The comments noted that it was working, but when I tried it myself it didn’t work. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

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