Database of New Jersey Residents Who Died in World War I

Thanks to New Jersey News Room for the story about the new database from the state of New Jersey. This new database contains information on the over 3400 New Jersey residents who died in World War I, and is available at https://wwwnet1.state.nj.us/DOS/Admin/ArchivesDBPortal/WWICards.aspx.

You can search this database in a variety of ways, from name to birth state to town of resident to even cause of death. I did a search for Ford and got three results. (If you get odd results, make sure you’re clicking on the “Search” button and not just hitting the enter key; a couple of times I got what looked like Web site search results.)

The table of results includes name, residence, place of birth, cause of death, information available (some people have pictures available, some don’t.)

All the information about the fallen soldiers is contained in cards. As you can see in this instance for Horace Ford, there’s a picture of the solider, and beneath that the image of the soldier. Information on the card includes birth date, rank, and persons notified at death. There’s a quick link to print the page too.

About half the search results I saw had pictures. That combined with the card information makes this a great genealogy resource.

About researchbuzz

Covering the world of search engines, databases, and other online information collections since 1996.

Posted on January 17, 2011, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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