Kindle, Harvard, Google, Twitter, More: Wednesday Morning Frozen Buzz, January 23, 2013

Rick Broida reviews a site with free Kindle books. Look at the comments for more freebie suggestions.

The Harvard Film Archive’s records are now searchable through HOLLIS (Harvard OnLine Library Information System). This covers over 23,000 films and videotapes, while the previous number of catalogued records was only a fraction of that.

I believe the technical term for Google’s latest earnings is “crap-ton”.

Apparently the White House has announced a national “Day of Civic Hacking”. This makes me unaccountably grumpy.

Boundless, the textbook alternative company, has released its content under Creative Commons.

Twitter has expanded the capabilities of embedded tweets.

So apparently the FDLP doesn’t like curl. “The CSV’s URL (linked from this post) is not blocked by their robots.txt. Using an alternate tool, wget, worked fine. My colleague Thom Neale humorously noted that having curl tell FDLP.gov that it’s “microsoft-malware-professional-2013″ also worked, but Waldo found that “Mozilla/5.0″ did not.” LAME.

Larry Ferlazzo has a roundup of the best Super Bowl sites. I mean, if you need any additional information beyond the bare fact that the Chicago Cubs are going to win. Good morning, Internet…

About Tara Calishain

Covering the world of search engines, databases, and other online information collections since 1996.

Posted on January 23, 2013, in morningbuzz. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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