Category Archives: morningbuzz

100% Googly: Morning Buzz, October 30th, 2014

It ended up that the first five items I pulled last night/this morning to write about were all about Google, so I decided to make this issue 100% about Google and its properties. If you are not a fan, you can skip. The Afternoon Buzz will be the usual varied selection. Thank you!

Want to try Google Inbox but don’t have an invite? You’ve got options.

More Google: it wants to Halloweenify your photos.

More More Google: Google Glass has been completely banned from movie theatres.

Sorry, I’m getting really Googly here: Google has released a new bookmark manager for Chrome.

Okay, I give up, this Buzz is going to be 100% Google: a cat showed up on Google Maps.

Thought-provoking article: Is Google responsible for delivering accurate and truthful search results?

Hoo boy: malware updating via GMail draft. “With the Gmail drafts folder open and hidden, the malware is programmed to use a Python script to retrieve commands and code that the hacker enters into that draft field. The malware responds with its own acknowledgments in Gmail draft form, along with the target data it’s programmed to exfiltrate from the victim’s network. All the communication is encoded to prevent it being spotted by intrusion detection or data-leak prevention. The use of a reputable web service instead of the usual IRC or HTTP protocols that hackers typically use to command their malware also helps keep the hack hidden.”

Google’s anti-piracy algo is apparently doing its job.

Wondering what Google’s DeepMind startup has been up to? Here ya go. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Google, Story Maps, Vine, More: Morning Buzz, October 29th, 2014

Use Vine? Here are 7 Tips and Tricks. I didn’t know most of these but I’m not a huge Vine user.

Do you use Tor? Might want to check for malware.

Now available: a seriously digital Susan Sontag archive. “UCLA’s Library of Special Collections has enabled your voyeurism by making public everything that was once on Susan Sontag’s Power Mac G4 and iBook. And when they say everything, they mean it: The digital archive contains all 17,198 of her emails, Word documents, and MP3s, from the 1990s to the early 2000s.”

FamilySearch has added another new round of records. “Notable collection updates include the 161,880 images from the Australia, New South Wales, Cemetery, Military, and Church Record Transcripts, 1816-1982, collection; the 195,602 images from the Illinois, Northern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1906-1991, collection; and the 57,359 indexed records from the Oregon, County Marriages, 1851-1975, collection.”

Apparently people are more afraid of Google using their personal information than the NSA. “In light of the many detailed reports based on Edward Snowden’s leaks that revealed the sophisticated technologies the NSA and other spying agencies can employ for mass surveillance purposes, a new survey from Survata seems to indicate that Internet users are more afraid of their personal data being used by Google than the NSA.” I wonder if “all of the above” was a choice….

Google is offering the first minute of international calls free via Google Hangouts. This is apparently only through the end of the year.

More Google: it is apparently developing a cancer and heart attack detector. “The idea is to identify slight changes in the person’s biochemistry that could act as an early warning system.” You get that? Google wants to index your biochemical system. One tweak to the algorithm and POW! Your liver falls out.

Tumblr is rolling out Yahoo ads.

YouTube is apparently considering ad-free paid subscriptions.

One of the Duke Libraries blogs has a great post on story maps, both on what they are and resources to make them.

The Archive of Contemporary Music and The Internet Archive are teaming up. “Powered by teams of volunteers, the two archives are partnering to digitize CDs and LPs and then use audio fingerprinting to match tracks with metadata from catalogs and other services. Using Internet Archive scanners, the ARC is digitizing its books and photographs at its New York facility. When complete, this music library will be a rich resource for historians, musicologists and the general public.”

Google Apps for Education users are getting unlimited Drive storage. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

NARA, Food, Excel, More: Morning Buzz, October 28th, 2014

If ever I am sad and lonely and want e-mail, I will simply forget to put a link in an issue of ResearchBuzz. Y’all pummeled me with messages when I accidentally left out the link to the useful spreadsheet templates. Here it is: http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/10-amazingly-useful-spreadsheet-templates-organise-life/ . Enjoy.

Reminder, y’all: the NARA Online Genealogy Fair starts today! Lots of streaming!

Need to know where to go to vote? Google makes it stupid easy.

Google Glass has lost its Twitter app.

Gee, I just use it to crunch numbers: 10 Works of Art Made in Microsoft Excel.

Speaking of Excel, somebody hacked it to play movies.

The USGS has released new topo maps of Maine which include portions of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail. (Yes, I know this is a bit far afield, but it fits under ” for reference librarians”. Also, I like Maine.)

Whee! Bing now lets you search by emoji.

PetaPixel pointed me toward this interesting online archive with information about over 10,000 vintage cameras.

VentureBeat has some tips on getting Facebook’s news feed to work better for you.

Did you know there’s a Google Street View tour of the New York Transit Museum?

The USDA has launched the Ag Census Web Maps application, “…a dynamic online tool that gives users rapid access to Census of Agriculture maps and data about crops and plants, livestock and animals, economics, farms, and operators in more than 3,000 counties across the United States.”

The Britain From Above Web site has added more than 1,000 aerial photographs of Northern Ireland. The photos in the article I’m linking to span the 1920s to the 1950s.

The Archive-It Web archiving service has launched version 5.0. “To date in 2014, 326 Archive-It partners have created 2700 public collections on a diversity and range of topics, subjects, events and domains. These collections have become integral to these organizations’ collecting strategies and have helped to raise awareness and understanding about why web archiving is so important.”

Bing has added a bunch of aerial and streetside imagery for state landmarks.

Yes, the online museum of barf bags. Because, that’s why. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Twitter, Idaho, NASA, More: Short Sunday Buzz, October 26th, 2014

Groupon has launched a new Yelp competitor called Pages (PRESS RELEASE). You do not want to hear my Groupon horror story.

Microsoft has opened up The Garage. “Microsoft clicked the Genie on Wednesday and invited the whole neighborhood into its online Garage to try out a handful of consumer apps that are still in the works.”

Twitter has launched Digits, a way to sign into apps using phone numbers instead of passwords.

Don’t want to use GMail or Dropbox? Techspot offers some alternatives.

The state of Idaho has launched an online portal for parcel data about Idaho counties (PRESS RELEASE). “Users can choose from two types of parcel standard downloads: public and comprehensive. Public parcel downloads include seven basic data fields, such as parcel unique identifier, date shared, and date that the polygon geometry was last updated. Comprehensive parcel downloads feature the same information as the public downloads plus 47 more data fields, including property descriptions, total assessed value, and value by category.”

Gombe National Park is now on Google Street View.

Don’t care for Google Analytics? Here are 14 alternatives.

Twitpic’s photo archive has been acquired by Twitter, so it’ll stay online for the time being.

NASA has launched a SoundCloud page of clips from historic missions. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

State Department, Birds, Brains, More: Morning Buzz, October 25th, 2014

TheNextWeb offers an in-depth guide to using Pocket. I love Pocket. ResearchBuzz would not be what it is without Pocket.

The US State Department has completed a big archiving project. “The State Department’s Bureau of International Organization Affairs, in partnership with the Library of Congress, recently completed an initiative to digitize and make available more than 50 years of reports detailing U.S. engagement with the United Nations. The reports are the United States Participation in the United Nations and Voting Practices in the United Nations, submitted annually to Congress.”

Firebase has been acquired by Google.

More Google: it is offering a new physical USB key to confirm logins. ” Security Key is a physical USB second factor that only works after verifying the login site is truly a Google website, not a fake site pretending to be Google. Rather than typing a code, just insert Security Key into your computer’s USB port and tap it when prompted in Chrome. When you sign into your Google Account using Chrome and Security Key, you can be sure that the cryptographic signature cannot be phished.”

More Google: it has released a lovely icon set. And it’s CC-BY-SA, to boot .

Facebook has launched a new app called Rooms. “A room is a feed of photos, videos, and text – not too different from the one you have on Instagram or Facebook – with a topic determined by whoever created the room. Early users have already created rooms for everything from beat boxing videos to parkour to photos of home- cooked meals. There’s even a room called ‘Kicks From Above’ that showcases photographs of cool shoes in cool places. “

Ello has filed as a Public Benefit Coporation. Good luck with that. “The news is that the company then filed as a Public Benefit Corporation, which means that it will never legally be able to sell ad space or user data or be sold to a buyer who plans to do either of those thing. Yes, that means that Ello is now a non-profit organization.”

Bird watching site FeederWatch has a new tool to explore decades of birdwatching data.

The Vatican is putting 4,000 manuscripts online for free access. “The library also includes letters from important historical figures, drawings and notes by artists and scientists such as Michelangelo and Galileo, as well as treaties from all eras in history. The ancient documents are now being preserved under the DigitaVaticana programme using FITS, the format developed by Nasa to store images, astronomical, and astrophysical data, and until now, only 500 manuscripts and 600 incunabula were available to view on the Vatican Library website.”

A new online database catalogs the impact of DNA variations on the brain. “A new online database called Braineac details how variations in DNA sequence shape gene expression in the human brain. The open-access resource, described 31 August in Nature Neuroscience, may help autism researchers understand the effects of genetic variants — particularly those in noncoding regions of the genome — linked to the disorder.”

Expedia has launched an image library (PRESS RELEASE). “Expedia.com, one of the world’s largest full service online travel sites1, today announced the next evolution of its highly acclaimed Expedia Viewfinder Blog with the launch of the new Expedia Viewfinder Image Library – a free online resource containing more than 40,000 images for media outlets, journalists, bloggers and other content creators. Empowering the travel community with incredible access to free high-quality travel visuals and inspiration, users can browse the extensive selection of reproduction-quality images with embedded metadata to help tell their stories on a broad range of third-party sites and projects by visiting the Expedia Viewfinder Image Library.”

Google Knowledge Graph: now with video games. “Search queries on video games will result in a knowledge graph panel that includes details like the game’s release date, supported platforms, developers, review scores and more.” Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Odia, Names, Google, More: Morning Buzz, October 20th, 2014

A new tool data mines donor information and tells you if your name is liberal or conservative. “The ratings are determined by how often someone with a specific name donates to liberal or conservative politicians. (To arrive at the top 20 names in each group, Crowdpac’s number crunchers did some extra work, looking at names associated with at least 1,000 donations since 1980 to exclude outliers.)” Be sure to do all iterations of a name; according to this tool “Mike” is more conservative than “Michael.”

John Overholt has a new blog curating early versions of Wikipedia articles.

Google Translate has a new Chrome extension.

The Odia language is getting a Wikisource site. “Speakers of Odia will soon have mountains of books to read online in their mother tongue, following the launch of the Odia Wikisource, which will make accessible many rare books that have entered the public domain. Authors and publishers are also invited to donate their copyrighted work, possibly bringing open access to large volumes of books and manuscripts, creating a vast archive of educational resources. And everything will be in Odia.”

Flickr has launched an iPad app.

From How-To Geek: How to use Google Keep for frustration-free note taking. Unless Google decides to cancel it.

Do you want to remove images from Google Maps views? Here’s how.

Google has released a Penguin update.

Genealogists, FindAGrave has new upload and transcribe tools available (they’re in beta). Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Whisper, TwitPic, BBC, More: Morning Buzz, October 19th, 2014

Hey! Use Google Sheets to have multi-lingual chats. From Amit Agarwal, of course.

FamilySearch keeps adding those records. “States. Notable collection updates include the 2,694,665 images from the Slovakia, Church and Synagogue Books, 1592-1910, collection; the 2,785,409 images from the US, New Jersey, State Census, 1915, collection; and the 2,155,570 indexed records from the US, Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001, collection.”

The ALA has archived its Ebola Webinar and made it available online.

Google is rolling out another search update in an attempt to downrank sites containing pirated content. “The update will also affect search autofill behavior to prevent sites with pirated content from appearing in results. Furthermore, “legitimate” media sites like Netflix, Amazon, and Google Play will be prioritized to the top of Google’s results page when users search for a particular movie, TV show, or song.”

Do you use Whisper? Do you think it keeps your posts completely safe and anonymous? You might want to rethink that. “The company behind Whisper, the social media app that promises users anonymity and claims to be ‘the safest place on the internet’, is tracking the location of its users, including some who have specifically asked not to be followed. The practice of monitoring the whereabouts of Whisper users – including those who have expressly opted out of geolocation services – will alarm users, who are encouraged to disclose intimate details about their private and professional lives. Whisper is also sharing information with the US Department of Defense gleaned from smartphones it knows are used from military bases, and developing a version of its app to conform with Chinese censorship laws.”

A huge fanzine collection is getting digitized.

Is. Isn’t. Is. For reals. Twitpic is shutting down. You have until October 25th to get your pics.

Are parents going to be held accountable for what their kids do on Facebook?

The Internet Archive now has a map of book subjects. Wooooooow. “The relationship data for this map has been generated by first retrieving all the tags of the Internet Archive’s images on flickr and then connecting those subjects which appear together on an image. The resulting similarity matrix has been processed using the t-Distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding (t-SNE) technique which groups topics by the strength of their relationship. In the last step the layout gets cleaned up automatically so that no text blocks overlap.” When I tried this it was kludgy, but as an indicator of what might be possible I really like it.

Twitter will now show you tweets from people you don’t follow. Because marketing. And because famous people don’t have enough outlets to get their faces all up in your face. Blah.

The BBC will start keeping a public log of articles removed under “Right to be Forgotten.”

Snapchat will soon have advertising. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,977 other followers