Category Archives: morningbuzz

State Department, Birds, Brains, More: Morning Buzz, October 25th, 2014

TheNextWeb offers an in-depth guide to using Pocket. I love Pocket. ResearchBuzz would not be what it is without Pocket.

The US State Department has completed a big archiving project. “The State Department’s Bureau of International Organization Affairs, in partnership with the Library of Congress, recently completed an initiative to digitize and make available more than 50 years of reports detailing U.S. engagement with the United Nations. The reports are the United States Participation in the United Nations and Voting Practices in the United Nations, submitted annually to Congress.”

Firebase has been acquired by Google.

More Google: it is offering a new physical USB key to confirm logins. ” Security Key is a physical USB second factor that only works after verifying the login site is truly a Google website, not a fake site pretending to be Google. Rather than typing a code, just insert Security Key into your computer’s USB port and tap it when prompted in Chrome. When you sign into your Google Account using Chrome and Security Key, you can be sure that the cryptographic signature cannot be phished.”

More Google: it has released a lovely icon set. And it’s CC-BY-SA, to boot .

Facebook has launched a new app called Rooms. “A room is a feed of photos, videos, and text – not too different from the one you have on Instagram or Facebook – with a topic determined by whoever created the room. Early users have already created rooms for everything from beat boxing videos to parkour to photos of home- cooked meals. There’s even a room called ‘Kicks From Above’ that showcases photographs of cool shoes in cool places. “

Ello has filed as a Public Benefit Coporation. Good luck with that. “The news is that the company then filed as a Public Benefit Corporation, which means that it will never legally be able to sell ad space or user data or be sold to a buyer who plans to do either of those thing. Yes, that means that Ello is now a non-profit organization.”

Bird watching site FeederWatch has a new tool to explore decades of birdwatching data.

The Vatican is putting 4,000 manuscripts online for free access. “The library also includes letters from important historical figures, drawings and notes by artists and scientists such as Michelangelo and Galileo, as well as treaties from all eras in history. The ancient documents are now being preserved under the DigitaVaticana programme using FITS, the format developed by Nasa to store images, astronomical, and astrophysical data, and until now, only 500 manuscripts and 600 incunabula were available to view on the Vatican Library website.”

A new online database catalogs the impact of DNA variations on the brain. “A new online database called Braineac details how variations in DNA sequence shape gene expression in the human brain. The open-access resource, described 31 August in Nature Neuroscience, may help autism researchers understand the effects of genetic variants — particularly those in noncoding regions of the genome — linked to the disorder.”

Expedia has launched an image library (PRESS RELEASE). “Expedia.com, one of the world’s largest full service online travel sites1, today announced the next evolution of its highly acclaimed Expedia Viewfinder Blog with the launch of the new Expedia Viewfinder Image Library – a free online resource containing more than 40,000 images for media outlets, journalists, bloggers and other content creators. Empowering the travel community with incredible access to free high-quality travel visuals and inspiration, users can browse the extensive selection of reproduction-quality images with embedded metadata to help tell their stories on a broad range of third-party sites and projects by visiting the Expedia Viewfinder Image Library.”

Google Knowledge Graph: now with video games. “Search queries on video games will result in a knowledge graph panel that includes details like the game’s release date, supported platforms, developers, review scores and more.” Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Odia, Names, Google, More: Morning Buzz, October 20th, 2014

A new tool data mines donor information and tells you if your name is liberal or conservative. “The ratings are determined by how often someone with a specific name donates to liberal or conservative politicians. (To arrive at the top 20 names in each group, Crowdpac’s number crunchers did some extra work, looking at names associated with at least 1,000 donations since 1980 to exclude outliers.)” Be sure to do all iterations of a name; according to this tool “Mike” is more conservative than “Michael.”

John Overholt has a new blog curating early versions of Wikipedia articles.

Google Translate has a new Chrome extension.

The Odia language is getting a Wikisource site. “Speakers of Odia will soon have mountains of books to read online in their mother tongue, following the launch of the Odia Wikisource, which will make accessible many rare books that have entered the public domain. Authors and publishers are also invited to donate their copyrighted work, possibly bringing open access to large volumes of books and manuscripts, creating a vast archive of educational resources. And everything will be in Odia.”

Flickr has launched an iPad app.

From How-To Geek: How to use Google Keep for frustration-free note taking. Unless Google decides to cancel it.

Do you want to remove images from Google Maps views? Here’s how.

Google has released a Penguin update.

Genealogists, FindAGrave has new upload and transcribe tools available (they’re in beta). Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Whisper, TwitPic, BBC, More: Morning Buzz, October 19th, 2014

Hey! Use Google Sheets to have multi-lingual chats. From Amit Agarwal, of course.

FamilySearch keeps adding those records. “States. Notable collection updates include the 2,694,665 images from the Slovakia, Church and Synagogue Books, 1592-1910, collection; the 2,785,409 images from the US, New Jersey, State Census, 1915, collection; and the 2,155,570 indexed records from the US, Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001, collection.”

The ALA has archived its Ebola Webinar and made it available online.

Google is rolling out another search update in an attempt to downrank sites containing pirated content. “The update will also affect search autofill behavior to prevent sites with pirated content from appearing in results. Furthermore, “legitimate” media sites like Netflix, Amazon, and Google Play will be prioritized to the top of Google’s results page when users search for a particular movie, TV show, or song.”

Do you use Whisper? Do you think it keeps your posts completely safe and anonymous? You might want to rethink that. “The company behind Whisper, the social media app that promises users anonymity and claims to be ‘the safest place on the internet’, is tracking the location of its users, including some who have specifically asked not to be followed. The practice of monitoring the whereabouts of Whisper users – including those who have expressly opted out of geolocation services – will alarm users, who are encouraged to disclose intimate details about their private and professional lives. Whisper is also sharing information with the US Department of Defense gleaned from smartphones it knows are used from military bases, and developing a version of its app to conform with Chinese censorship laws.”

A huge fanzine collection is getting digitized.

Is. Isn’t. Is. For reals. Twitpic is shutting down. You have until October 25th to get your pics.

Are parents going to be held accountable for what their kids do on Facebook?

The Internet Archive now has a map of book subjects. Wooooooow. “The relationship data for this map has been generated by first retrieving all the tags of the Internet Archive’s images on flickr and then connecting those subjects which appear together on an image. The resulting similarity matrix has been processed using the t-Distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding (t-SNE) technique which groups topics by the strength of their relationship. In the last step the layout gets cleaned up automatically so that no text blocks overlap.” When I tried this it was kludgy, but as an indicator of what might be possible I really like it.

Twitter will now show you tweets from people you don’t follow. Because marketing. And because famous people don’t have enough outlets to get their faces all up in your face. Blah.

The BBC will start keeping a public log of articles removed under “Right to be Forgotten.”

Snapchat will soon have advertising. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Mocavo, Antique Pianos, Philadelphia, More: Morning Buzz, October 18th, 2014

Mocavo is having an open access weekend.

IFTTT used to have great Twitter triggers that they had to shut down in 2012 because Twitter treats third-party developers like crap. Anyway, IFTTT now has much better Twitter triggers. “…today’s rollout brings additional recipes which let you query deeper into Twitter’s stream, instead of only focusing on your own actions. These new triggers are far more useful, too. They can serve as a valuable research tool, allowing to you to do things like track a hashtag or keyword and turn that into a spreadsheet of tweets, or input that info into Slack. You can also configure Twitter (via IFTTT) to alert you to things going on nearby, or set up a digest of tweets, IFTTT suggests.”

7 Useful GMail Filters. Have I mentioned lately how much I miss Eudora? And its filters which would do everything except make toast?

Case Western Reserve University has joined HaithiTrust.

From the always-marvelous Amit: How to color alternate rows in Google Sheets.

Did you know there was an online museum for antique pianos? (PRESS RELEASE)

Is the FBI going to take action against Google and Apple over encryption?

DELICIOUS, of all sites, is curating an ebola resources page.

The Wellcome Library is trying an odd little experiment where images from its archive are shown to reflect current weather conditions. Could be fun.

The Internet Archive is offering the 2014 Philly Political Media Ad Watch. “The project is a collaboration between the Internet Archive, Sunlight Foundation, Philadelphia’s Committee of Seventy (a non-partisan government watchdog), University of Delaware’s Center for Community Research & Service and the Linguistic Data Consortium at the University of Pennsylvania. It immediately enables local media to do a better job sifting between fact and fiction in political messaging and revealing financial sources of political influence.”

IFTTT has added a Honeywell evohome channel.

Yahoo has launched a new accessibility page. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Firefox, Charts, More: Short Morning Buzz, October 17th, 2014

Moving your Web site? Google has updated its change-of-address tool.

Now available: Firefox 33. “Mozilla today officially launched Firefox 33 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android. Major additions include OpenH264 support as well as the ability to send video content from webpages to a second screen.”

From Sitepoint: 5 tools for creating online charts.

There’s a a new online archive of Washington DC photographs.

The BBC has launched the BBC Genome project – see what was showing on the Beeb the day you were born! “Fancy knowing the TV schedule from the day you were born? The BBC has your back, with the newly-launched project Genome — a searchable online archive of the broadcaster’s schedule. The archive, which has been available to BBC staff since last year but today has been made available to the public, was constructed out of digitised copies of the Radio Times, the schedule magazine founded and originally published by the Beeb.”

Information from UK psychiatric hospitals from the 18th to the 20th centuries will be digitized and put online. “The project will focus on records dating from the 19th and 20th century, and will touch on the movement away from institutional care as the 20th century progressed. Patient records and case notes, photographs, administrative documents and registers will be digitised, creating an extensive online archive that will be a valuable resource for historical research.” Good morning, Internet..

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Twitter, Player Pianos, Ello, More: Morning Buzz, October 16th, 2014

Hey! Happy 20th birthday, Netscape Navigator! MAN I am old.

Oops and yikes: a Dropbox bug has deleted a bunch of files from the cloud. And apparently some of those files aren’t recoverable.

Google Spreadsheets are getting Smart Autofill. Here’s hoping it’s not as much fun as AutoCorrect or who knows what’s going to end up in my spreadsheets.

Twitter users in France can transfer money through tweets.

Google is trialing doctor video consultations.

You can now use stickers in Facebook comments. Stickers are those big emojis that used to be restricted to just Facebook messages.

The British Library has put 46 more Greek manuscripts online.

LinkedIn is getting hit with a class-action lawsuit.

Ello is having some growing pains. (By the way, if you want an Ello invitation, send me a note through this site’s contract form or @researchbuzz me on Twitter.)

This sounds lovely: Stanford is starting the Player Piano Project. Restoration, digitizing!

Bing has launched an election information site.

Yahoo takes a look back at a year of bug hunting. “Our Bug Bounty program has matured and grown since last October. We are proud to now have more than 600 contributors, we’ve also paid over $700,000 in bounties to contributing researchers since our launch. Inspite of this growth we haven’t forgotten our roots. This is why we still send the occasional t-shirt to researchers who successfully identify a tech vulnerability of significant value.”

The Online Historical Newspapers Site has posted a bunch of updates. Hope your shoulder continues to do well, Miriam!

From Hongkiat: 7 New Google Chrome Features You Should Know.

Google has made some improvements to Google Classroom.

The National Library of Medicine has an Ebola information page. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Wisconsin, Scholarly Papers, Rock Art, More: Morning Buzz, October 11th, 2014

UC Irvine has won a grant to grow a brain cell activity database. “Researchers at UC Irvine will study brain cell activity in disorders such as Lou Gehrig’s disease to create a digital library of information that it is hoped will help lead to treatments.”

So how many scholarly papers are on the Web, anyway? “Using statistical methods, [Lee] Giles and [Madian] Khabsa estimated that at least 114 million English-language scholarly documents are accessible on the Web, of which Google Scholar has nearly 100 million. They estimate that at least 27 million (24 percent) are freely available since they do not require a subscription or payment of any kind. The estimates are limited to English documents only.”

Papers from six Nobel Prize winners are now freely available through the end of the year. “Research papers published by six 2014 Nobel Prize recipients whose accomplishments in physics and chemistry have been enabled by photonics are being made freely available in the SPIE Digital Library through the end of 2014.”

There is now a way to schedule your Instagram posts.

A new public portal provides information about endangered resources in Wisconsin. “The Natural Heritage Inventory Public Portal is a free, online mapping application available to anyone who owns land or is an authorized representative of property in Wisconsin. The public portal allows individuals to complete an Endangered Resources Preliminary Assessment. … Now, the preliminary assessment provides an instant record and summary of the project, a map of the project area and determining results based on the impact to endangered resources. These results will indicate to a landowner if they need to continue by requesting an ER Review.”

The British Museum has acquired the TARA archive. No, not me. TARA stands for Trust for African Rock Art. “TARA’s 25,000-image-strong digital archive has been acquired by the British Museum and will be cataloged and made available online over the next five years, the Telegraph reports. By joining TARA’s efforts, the British Museum seeks to ensure that African rock art sites are recorded and preserved for future generations.”

Google’s “Right to be Forgotten” has hit the New York Times. “Over the weekend, the NY Times revealed that it is the latest publication to receive notification from Google that some of its results will no longer show up for searches on certain people’s names, under the whole “right to be forgotten” nuttiness going on in Europe these days. As people in our comments have pointed out in the past, it’s important to note that the stories themselves aren’t erased from Google’s index entirely — they just won’t show up when someone searches on the particular name of the person who complained. Still, the whole effort is creating a bit of a Streisand Effect in calling new attention to the impacted articles.”

From the Buffer blog – 23 tools and resources to create images for social media.

Twitter has sued the US government for the right to be more transparent. “After months of attempted negotiations, the company has filed a lawsuit on Tuesday, alleging that the restrictions imposed by the government — which regulate what Twitter can publish about national security related surveillance requests — violate its First Amendment rights.”

IFTTT now has a Sina Weibo channel. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

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