Category Archives: morningbuzz

Apps, GPO, GIFs, More: Morning Buzz, September 11th, 2014

From an archiving point of view — physical diaries versus digital calendars. This is “diaries” in the British sense… I think we’d say “appointment books” here in the US.

Like something you see on Google Hangouts? Now you can applaud.

The first digital library from the GPO depository program has gone live in North Dakota. “The library, part of North Dakota’s Sitting Bull College servicing the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation community, ‘is opting to meet their community’s needs by developing an online government information collection,’ a release from the GPO said. ‘In choosing this format, the library will not receive print materials from GPO.'”

Google Hangouts now offers free voice calls. “Starting today you can make voice calls from Hangouts on Android, iOS and the web. It’s free to call other Hangouts users, it’s free to call numbers in the U.S. and Canada, and the international rates are really low. So keeping in touch is easier and more affordable than ever.”

Adobe and Microsoft have both pushed out a bunch of critical fixes — get patchin’ y’all!

Well, crap. There’s been a leak of 5 million GMail names and passwords. Based on an article in The Mary Sue, however, looks like this data might be pretty old. Still… turned on 2-factor lately?

The state of Florida has created an online database of prison deaths. “The database lists inmates by name, prison, race and manner of death, and supplies other details that the Miami Herald had been trying to obtain from the department since May, when the newspaper began a series of articles about prison deaths.”

Wow! Check out these animated GIFs made from archival photos at the Library of Congress. Creeeeepy.

Facebook is apparently testing a feature that lets you schedule the deletion of your posts in advance.

Can you imagine getting coupons or other promotional material based on predicted behavior? Using tweets and other data to forecast behavior. “Some people are very careful about what data they give out, but the algorithms can work pretty well with anonymized data. Usable predictions can be made more than 60 percent of the time, if the right data are aggregated. And that data isn’t just coming from social media: Think about sources such as credit card transactions, monitored telephone calls, e-mail, GPS data.”

From Hongkiat: 10 Handy Pinterest Tools for Business.

CTIA has tested 1,000 apps for KnowMyApp.org (PRESS RELEASE). “Launched in December 2013, KnowMyApp.org informs customers how much data their favorite apps use before they download them while also providing app developers with resources to build more data-efficient apps. Testing the top paid and free apps from both the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores as well app submissions directly from developers, Intertek, the leading quality solutions provider to industries worldwide, tests and provides information to consumers on: How the app was tested; How much data is used when downloaded, when opened initially, during active run time and background time; How the app impacts data plans (i.e., 300MB, 1GB, 2GB and 4GB); and How users can conserve data usage.” Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

IoT, Maps, Group Study, More: Morning Buzz, September 10th, 2014

Did you get to watch the Apple livestream yesterday? If you didn’t, you didn’t miss anything; it was a real clusterpuddle. Here’s a roundup from Wired.

Speaking of Apple, it has lowered its iCloud pricing.

Wondering what the Internet of Things is all about? IEEE has you covered (press release). “The IEEE IoT eNewsletter is a bi-monthly, technically focused online publication that highlights important, current IoT-related technology developments, innovations, and trends from the world’s top subject matter experts, researchers and practitioners.” A Webinar series is starting too.

Malicious advertising is showing up on big Web sites. (Warning! PC World!) “When encountered, the malicious advertisements cause a person to be redirected to a different website, which triggers a download based on whether the computer is running Windows or Apple’s OS X, wrote Armin Pelkmann, a threat researcher.”

Mapperz hipped me to this online translater for GIS data. “The Easy Translator is available as a free web service, for immediately translating data into your required format and coordinate system.”

Speaking of maps, Larry Ferlazzo has an overview of easy map making site Heganoo.

MMmmkay: Amazon has launched a drone store.

Bloomberg is helping museums and other cultural institutions go digital. “Today, we announced the expansion and rebranding of Bloomberg Connects (formerly known as the Digital Engagement Initiative), which provides funding for cultural institutions to enhance the visitor experiences and increase access to culture using innovative technology tools.”

Do you remember the Ellis Island Passenger Search site? It’s gotten an extensive revamp and more records.

From Hongkiat: 5 Useful Tools for Online Group Study.

The Jerwood Library of the Performing Arts has joined the Flickr Commons. “Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance is the UK’s only conservatoire of music and contemporary dance. The Jerwood Library of the Performing Arts supports the music faculty of the college and contains a small but important collection of special collections and archives. The majority of this collection relates to the former Trinity College of Music (founded in 1872), its staff and students.”

Archiving challenge: What does Duke University do with 12,000 VHS tapes? Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Greek Manuscripts, Downtown Atlanta, Craigslist, More: Big Buzz, September 9th, 2014

Want to keep up with the big Apple news today? Yahoo’s got you covered.

Google has launched the School of YouTube. “The School of YouTube will see many of your favorite YouTube stars learn or teach something new. From figure-skating to salsa dancing, baking a cake to landing a plane, you’ll be able to watch a whole range of weird and wonderful lessons during the week of September 8 to 12.”

The British Library has put another 44 Greek manuscripts online.

Speaking of British, FamilySearch is doing a free Webinar for British Isles research.

From Greenbot, for all your returning students: manage your school day with Google Now.

It’s amazing and a bit scary to learn that just five gangs in Nigeria are behind most Craigslist buyer scams. “Five Nigerian criminal gangs are behind most scams targeting sellers on Craigslist, and they’ve taken new measures to make their swindles appear legitimate, according to a new study.” (Warning! PC World!)

Now you can visit the “Destiny” universe via Google Street View.

How-To Geek has a beginner’s article on creating using virtual machines.

Want to boot Google Glass and similar devices off your WiFi network? There’s a gadget for that (or there will be soon, anyway.)

The Georgia State Library has digitized a small collection of glass plate negatives of downtown Atlanta circa 1927. “The collection of nearly 100 images consists of downtown Atlanta storefronts and streets before the viaduct construction of 1927-1929. Later, some of these covered streets became part of what is now known as Underground Atlanta.”

This is interesting: Google Chrome is testing a more visible in-browser password generator.

More Google: Google has settled with another group over its Google Books program. “The agreement, reached late last week, is with a group of photographers, including the American Society of Media Photographers Inc., and settles charges filed in 2010 that Google’s scanning project was copyright infringement.”

Twitter has officially begun testing a “Buy” button. “The button will roll out to a select group of users first before being introduced more broadly. The initial sellers range from brands like Burberry and The Home Depot to artists like Ryan Adams and Megadeth.” Hmm… Home Depot?

Facebook video appears to be getting really popular, but I’m a bit cynical about how video “likes” are counted. “This spring, those clips started ramping up, because Facebook changed its algorithm to start showing more videos to people who like videos. But Facebook doesn’t require you to actively ‘engage’ with a video — by turning on the sound, or sharing it, or anything else — to decide that you like videos. All it needs you to do is watch a portion of the clip — Facebook won’t say out loud how long that is — without scrolling past.” Uh-huh.

Bing launched the Image Widget Tool, Getty sued, and now the Image Widget Tool is offline. The comments noted that it was working, but when I tried it myself it didn’t work. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Twitter, Nest, IFTTT, More: Morning Buzz, September 5th, 2014

Twitpic is shutting down. This service, which has been around since 2008, is being forced to shut down because Twitter has suddenly gotten a bee in its bonnet about TwitPic’s trademark application, which has been in process since 2009. Twitpic doesn’t have the resources for a legal fight with Twitter. Barf.

Speaking of barfing, Twitter is apparently going to ram a filtered feed, Facebook style, down the throats of its Twitter users. From the article: “The impetus for Twitter to filter is obvious: the service needs to show growth in both number of users and engagement in order to satisfy investors, and finding relevant content as a new user can be a challenge, which is why the company recently updated its so-called ‘on-boarding’ process.” You know, I get that. I really do – Twitter needs new users. But filtering feeds should be an option, not the only way a user’s Twitter feed is available. Otherwise, Twitter is attracting and integrating new users at the cost of alienating and angering its established user base. And there’s a word for that kind of strategy: stupid.

Apparently Google Glass’ partners aren’t all that thrilled about Google Glass either. Too bad we can’t harness PR spin to engage turbines and power cities.

More Google: Google has revealed The Cartographer, its indoor mapping backpack. “As the backpacker walks through a building, the floor plan is automatically generated in real time, Google says. The wearer also uses a tablet to add points of interest while walking around the building (say room numbers in a hotel or the exhibits in a museum).”

WordPress has released WordPress 4.0, “Benny”.

IFTTT now has a Best Buy channel. “The Best Buy Channel enables you to catch products as they become available in stores, follow when their prices change, and watch what the world is browsing today.” Hmm.. dear IFTTT, I would like a Tiger Direct channel, please.

Nest has released a 2.0 software update to its smoke alarm. “In the first major update to its smoke alarm software since the system was introduced last October, Google-acquired Nest Labs has developed a spate of new features designed to keep homes safe from fires and carbon monoxide, and to keep annoying alarms from going off when they shouldn’t be.” Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Baidu, FamilySearch, More: Brief Buzz, September 4th, 2014

FamilySearch, which is really busting out the Webinars lately, is going to offer one on doing Danish research.

Baidu is building its own version of Google Glass. Sort of. “The device does not feature a screen, and instead just beams information to a user’s smartphone.”

Microsoft’s Cortana can now predict NFL games.

Krebs on Security did some more research on the Home Depot breach: apparently it’s pretty huge. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Infographics, Yahoo, Sushi, More: Afternoon Buzz, September 3rd, 2014

Yahoo has introduced Yahoo Style. Joe Zee: “I joined Yahoo a few months ago to launch a unique digital fashion magazine that would combine my expertise as a veteran print magazine editor with my love of innovation and the internet. Today, I am excited to introduce Yahoo Style: a sophisticated, fresh take on fashion for everyone, from enthusiasts to those who love it from the sidelines.”

Stephen Arnold has a writeup on Picturegr.am, a new search engine for Instagram images. “A user can query Picturegr.am by hashtags or user name. Instagram users assign hashtags and their handles.”

Google’s quick answers are getting into fail territory. Reminds me of when Ask was doing a similar “quick answers” thing, and similarly was not really vetting the results the search engine was scraping. And that’s how you end up with a British euphemism for tonker on your search results page. (Uh, a euphemism for tonker that is not, in fact, “tonker.”)

From How-To Geek: 10 Tips and Tricks for Google Docs.

Mozilla has released security updates for Firefox and Thunderbird.

From the CIT Blog at Duke: Google Glass for teaching and learning, Part I. “Since the Spring of 2014, CIT has been testing the Google Glass Explorer Edition for potential teaching and learning uses at Duke. We’ve discovered some interesting uses for this revolutionary technology which could impact the Duke academic community in positive, engaging ways.”

From Noupe: 10 Tools to Create Beautiful Infographics. Hmm…. beautiful… You know Cakewrecks? We need Infographicwrecks, because sometimes it just doesn’t end up like it looks on the screen. Good afternoon, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Google Forms, About.com, Getty, More: Morning Buzz, September 3rd, 2014

FamilySearch is offering a free Webinar on doing South Africa research.

Google Forms is finally offering themes. About time.

Google Enterprise has changed its name to Google for Work.

Have you shopped at Home Depot lately? You may want to keep an eye on your credit card.

Reddit has launched an AMA app.

YouTube creators can now get “tips” from fans.

Interesting: Tocomail gives parents controls for a teen’s GMail account.

About.com is getting a redesign. Remember when it was called The Mining Company?

Catching up … the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names has been released as linked open data. “The Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names is a resource of over 2,000,000 names of current and historical places, including cities, archaeological sites, nations, and physical features. It focuses mainly on places relevant to art, architecture, archaeology, art conservation, and related fields.”

From the Washington Post: three ways to step up your own cloud security. And the reason Amazon still doesn’t offer two-factor is…. ?

FamilySearch: now with another heapin’ helpin’ of records. “Notable collection updates include the 1,703,079 indexed records from the Jamaica, Civil Registration, 1880–1999, collection; the 2,522,767 indexed records and images from the United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980–2014, collection; and the 852,481 indexed records from U.S., New York, Passenger Lists, 1820–1891, collection. “

NARA is going to host its second virtual genealogy fair at the end of October.

Bing Maps: now with much more South Korea data.

Sigh: Hackers are using Google’s VirusTotal to test their attacks. This is why we can’t have nice things. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

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