Baidu, FamilySearch, More: Brief Buzz, September 4th, 2014

FamilySearch, which is really busting out the Webinars lately, is going to offer one on doing Danish research.

Baidu is building its own version of Google Glass. Sort of. “The device does not feature a screen, and instead just beams information to a user’s smartphone.”

Microsoft’s Cortana can now predict NFL games.

Krebs on Security did some more research on the Home Depot breach: apparently it’s pretty huge. Good morning, Internet…

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Infographics, Yahoo, Sushi, More: Afternoon Buzz, September 3rd, 2014

Yahoo has introduced Yahoo Style. Joe Zee: “I joined Yahoo a few months ago to launch a unique digital fashion magazine that would combine my expertise as a veteran print magazine editor with my love of innovation and the internet. Today, I am excited to introduce Yahoo Style: a sophisticated, fresh take on fashion for everyone, from enthusiasts to those who love it from the sidelines.”

Stephen Arnold has a writeup on Picturegr.am, a new search engine for Instagram images. “A user can query Picturegr.am by hashtags or user name. Instagram users assign hashtags and their handles.”

Google’s quick answers are getting into fail territory. Reminds me of when Ask was doing a similar “quick answers” thing, and similarly was not really vetting the results the search engine was scraping. And that’s how you end up with a British euphemism for tonker on your search results page. (Uh, a euphemism for tonker that is not, in fact, “tonker.”)

From How-To Geek: 10 Tips and Tricks for Google Docs.

Mozilla has released security updates for Firefox and Thunderbird.

From the CIT Blog at Duke: Google Glass for teaching and learning, Part I. “Since the Spring of 2014, CIT has been testing the Google Glass Explorer Edition for potential teaching and learning uses at Duke. We’ve discovered some interesting uses for this revolutionary technology which could impact the Duke academic community in positive, engaging ways.”

From Noupe: 10 Tools to Create Beautiful Infographics. Hmm…. beautiful… You know Cakewrecks? We need Infographicwrecks, because sometimes it just doesn’t end up like it looks on the screen. Good afternoon, Internet…

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Google Forms, About.com, Getty, More: Morning Buzz, September 3rd, 2014

FamilySearch is offering a free Webinar on doing South Africa research.

Google Forms is finally offering themes. About time.

Google Enterprise has changed its name to Google for Work.

Have you shopped at Home Depot lately? You may want to keep an eye on your credit card.

Reddit has launched an AMA app.

YouTube creators can now get “tips” from fans.

Interesting: Tocomail gives parents controls for a teen’s GMail account.

About.com is getting a redesign. Remember when it was called The Mining Company?

Catching up … the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names has been released as linked open data. “The Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names is a resource of over 2,000,000 names of current and historical places, including cities, archaeological sites, nations, and physical features. It focuses mainly on places relevant to art, architecture, archaeology, art conservation, and related fields.”

From the Washington Post: three ways to step up your own cloud security. And the reason Amazon still doesn’t offer two-factor is…. ?

FamilySearch: now with another heapin’ helpin’ of records. “Notable collection updates include the 1,703,079 indexed records from the Jamaica, Civil Registration, 1880–1999, collection; the 2,522,767 indexed records and images from the United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980–2014, collection; and the 852,481 indexed records from U.S., New York, Passenger Lists, 1820–1891, collection. “

NARA is going to host its second virtual genealogy fair at the end of October.

Bing Maps: now with much more South Korea data.

Sigh: Hackers are using Google’s VirusTotal to test their attacks. This is why we can’t have nice things. Good morning, Internet…

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WordPress, Bauhaus, Physics, More: Morning Buzz, September 2nd, 2014

Well, there’s a match made in heaven: The Internet Archive has joined Flickr Commons.

Ubuntu 14.10 Beta 1 has been released. (That’s Utopic Unicorn for those of you playing along at home.)

Georgia State University Library has released its WordPress plugin, “Library Instruction Recorder”, as open source.

Infographic: How to get more interaction on Google+. They left off a tip: be way cooler than me.

From Lifehacker: How to turn GMail into your central productivity hub. Well, it’s a nice idea….

Several Bauhaus texts are now available for free.

The Feynman Lectures on Physics are now available in their entirety online and for free. “First presented in the early 1960s at Caltech by the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman, the lectures were eventually turned into a book by Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, and Matthew Sands. The text went on to become arguably the most popular physics book ever written, selling more than 1.5 million copies in English, and getting translated into a dozen languages.”

A TweetDeck for Instagram? Hey, I could handle that. Check out this article on Picdeck.

The federal government is creating a database to track hate speech on Twitter. Hey, you know who I’d like to track hate speech on Twitter? TWITTER ITSELF.

In case you’ve been living under a rock: Amazon has acquired Twitch.

Google Search now understands more than one language at a time.

Pointer from the always-awesome Robin Good: send files up to 5GB without using mail – https://ydray.com/ . Now of course I wouldn’t use this to send anything sensitive, but things like innocuous pictures or videos that happened to be very large? There you go.

Wanna feel old? Browse around these images of first-gen Web sites from the mid-90s. Actually some of them don’t look THAT different from today. Good morning, Internet…

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WordPress, Pacer, Museums, More: Morning Buzz, August 30th, 2014

Remixing EVERYWHERE: The British Library meets Burning Man.

WordPress has released the first candidate for WordPress 4.0.

Wondering why your GMail has all those weird ads? XRay might be able to tell you.

Wondering what theme a WordPress site is using? There’s a Web tool for that. (Thanks Robin Good!)

Pacer is deleting old court files because they’re “incompatible”. “On Aug. 10, the federal courts announced that older court records were being deleted from Pacer for federal appeals courts for the Federal Circuit, and the 2nd, 7th and 11th Circuits, report Legal Times, the Washington Post blog the Switch and the Wall Street Journal Law Blog. Older bankruptcy cases in the Central District of California were also removed. The files were deleted Aug. 11.” How wrong is this?

Lovely! Guy puts America’s museums onto a map – and then he supplemented the map with data from Wikipedia. (It’s amazing how many museums don’t have Web pages.

Google has made is security compliance audit report public. “The new reports and certificates now cover Google+ and Hangouts, which is nice, but the real news here is that Google is making both its ISO 27001 certificate and SOC 3 audit report easily available to anybody who wants to take a look. The SOC 3 report is about a 10-page document that summarizes the audit’s finding and lists the services that the auditors inspected. By default, this report is meant to be made public. The SOC 2 report is significantly more in-depth and runs a few hundred pages, but sadly Google isn’t making that one public.”

Do you have an HP laptop? Check your power cord. HP is recalling some power cords as fire hazards. There are over five million of these bad boys floating around out there, so check your cables!

A new project makes the pictures taken by the Farm Security Administration between 1935 and 1945 easier to explore. Among other things, over 90,000 of them are mapped.

Twitter has opened up its analytics dashboard to everybody. Now you can see how many more people see your posts on Twitter than Facebook, despite your Facebook fan page having far more followers. That’s what happened with me, anyway.

Dropbox Pro has added a couple new features as well as a terabyte of space for Pro subscribers. That’ll be handy.

The FBI has digitized millions of files in what it calls a “modernization push.” Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Paraguay, IFTTT, Athens (GA), More: Afternoon Buzz, August 29th, 2014

FamilySearch is beginning to index the 1891 Toulouse Census and is looking for volunteers who can speak both French and English.

A man after my own heart has been uploading pictures from Internet Archive books… to Flickr. “The Internet Archive had used an optical character recognition (OCR) program to analyse each of its 600 million scanned pages in order to convert the image of each word into searchable text. As part of the process, the software recognised which parts of a page were pictures in order to discard them. Mr. Leetaru’s code used this information to go back to the original scans, extract the regions the OCR program had ignored, and then save each one as a separate file in the Jpeg picture format.”

The talent who does the voices of Mario, Luigi, Wario, etc has joined Instagram and is posting cute videos with is voice and character figures. I like the one with the llama.

Nice! Paraguay is getting a digital archive of all 20 of its indigenous languages. “The initiative, which was launched today by officials from the Department of Anthropology of the University, is the first step to collect sound recordings and images of native testimony, grammars, documents, glossaries, legend and work of specialists.”

Interesting question, not sure anybody knows the answer. What does “Don’t be evil” mean in a post-Snowden world?

Taneya Koonce will be doing her first Google Hangouts on Air on September 6th and everyone is invited. “I volunteer with my local chapter of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society and my webinar will be for them. The society has a one-of-a-kind newspaper history project to capture history and genealogy information from HBCU student newspapers. During the session, I’ll demonstrate the indexing process and provide details on how you can contribute towards this important effort.”

The NGS has a quick overview article of current crowdsourcing projects relevant to the genealogy community.

IFTTT now has an Eyefi channel and MAN, I’m going to have some fun with that. (I’m already using Eyefi in conjunction with Dropbox for some projects at work. It is SO HANDY!)

The Digital Library of Georgia has announced an enhanced version of the Athens Historic Newspapers Archive. “The Athens Historic Newspapers Archive is now compatible with all current browsers and provides access to nine newspaper titles published in Athens from 1827 to 1928 without the use of plug-ins or additional software downloads. Consisting of over 77,000 newspaper pages, the archive provides historical images that are both full-text searchable and can be browsed by date.”

Google has updated Chrome with a ton of security fixes, so if you’re using Chrome make sure you get the new version. Good afternoon, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Instagram, Bing, NOLA, Biodiversity, More: Morning Buzz, August 29th, 2014

Still getting crushed at work!

Google Authorship is now kaput. Really glad I didn’t put too much energy into this one.

Lifehacker is putting out a call for the best free online classes.

Instagram has launched a new app called Hyperlapse, and BOY does it sound cool: “Traditionally, time lapse videos depend on holding your phone or camera still while you film. Hyperlapse from Instagram features built-in stabilization technology that lets you create moving, handheld time lapses that result in a cinematic look, quality and feel—a feat that has previously only been possible with expensive equipment.”

Microsoft has re-issued a Windows security update after some initial problems.

NOLA.com has launched a searchable online database of property transactions in the New Orleans area. “The data, so far, ranges from January 2014 to now, but transfers from the past five years will eventually be added. The sale price is always included when available.”

Bing is taking aim at Web spam.

More Bing: Bing Maps has a bunch of new imagery.

Appalachian State University has been awarded a grant for a very exciting biodiversity database project. “Professor Zack E. Murrell is leading a multi-state, $2.545 million project to create a digitized database of more than 3 million plant specimens from across the Southeast.”

Google has launched a new Google for Education blog. “We love to focus on solving problems. Sometimes practically and other times with wild, imaginative—or even highly unexpected—ideas. These ideas are born through education, when curiosity meets access to information. That’s why we have a vested interest in, and commitment to, learning in all forms. It’s also why we’re starting this Google for Education Blog: a new destination to share our work that’s happening across education, from products to programs, from the practical to the unimaginable.”

From Entrepreneur: four steps to plan a successful tweetup.

Yahoo is apparently experimenting with a new user interface. Don’t everybody hit the link at once.

Kanasas State University is creating a digital archive of agricultural writing. “The contract, worth more than $7,000, allows the team to digitize and preserve important Kansas youth-in-agriculture, agricultural education and rural life publications. Titles include Kansas 4‐H Journal, 1955-1988; Kansas Future Farmer, 1929-1979; and five additional newsletters and magazines.”

Did you know you could search for special characters in Google Drive by drawing them? Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

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