Spindly Short Thursday Afternoon Buzz

NEW RESOURCES

Social network Mobli has launched a real-time image search engine. “Now available on the web and as a mobile app, EyeIn’s algorithms filter out content like selfies to return the most relevant results to users almost as soon as they are posted on social networks.”

A new seed selection tool is available for farmers in Hawaii. “The Seed Variety Selection Tool will aid gardeners and small-scale farmers in Hawai’i in choosing crop varieties that are the most likely to succeed in the geographic area they are being grown.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

YouTube is getting more into eyewitness video. “Today, more than 5 million hours of news video is watched on YouTube every day, and the role of the eyewitness has never had a more vital place in the newsgathering process. We live in a world where anyone can bear witness to what is happening around them and share it with a global audience, and YouTube has become a primary home for this powerful, first-person documentary footage.” I’m not sure how this is going to work against Meerkat or Periscope.

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

So, um, yeah. The US National Vulnerability Database? Had an XSS vulnerability. “The NVD serves as a definitive source of information on CVE security flaws. The XSS vulnerability meant that a skilled hacker could present surfers with content from arbitrary third-party sites as if it came from the NVD itself.”

From The Times of India: Using Google Maps to resolve land conversion disputes. “Mohammed Ali, revenue divisional officer, Thrissur, says the Google Earth Map which has data on land pattern since 2002, is the way forward in resolving such issues.
‘Earlier when an application for building a structure over a converted land came up, agricultural or village officers were told “to inspect and report”. Now using demarcated satellite map and GPS coordinates of the plot we search the Google Earth Map to identify the current status of the land and its pattern of use in 2008,’ says the Thrissur RDO.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Facebook suggesting status update topics? What could possibly go wrong.

Google has launched a “companion app” for Ramadan. “You can find out the sunset time in your location and plan your day accordingly, check out the traffic in your area, navigate to the closest charity Iftar, find and share recipes, and enjoy Ramadan content on YouTube ranging from drama series and comedy sketches and health tips to stay fit during the 30 days of fasting.”

Social network Ello has finally gone mobile.

Several orchestras are putting some of their live recordings on Google Play.

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Short Spindly Wednesday Buzz

NEW RESOURCES

I don’t know how new it is, but I just found out about it: a lot of back issues of OMNI Magazine are now available on the Internet Archive. Not a complete run, though.

Ooooh. Google Trends is going real-time and adding data sets. “You can now find real-time data on everything from the FIFA scandal to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign kick-off, and get a sense of what stories people are searching for. Many of these changes are based on feedback we’ve collected through conversations with hundreds of journalists and others around the world—so whether you’re a reporter, a researcher, or an armchair trend-tracker, the new site gives you a faster, deeper and more comprehensive view of our world through the lens of Google Search…. To help you understand the data behind the headlines, our News Lab team examines trending topics every day and finds interesting nuggets of data that bring news stories to life. You can follow us on Twitter to stay up to date. And for data journalists who want to do their own analysis, starting today we’ll publish data sets on specific topics to our Github page.”

USEFUL STUFF

Hongkiat: 12 YouTube Tricks You Probably Didn’t Know. I did know most of them, but it’s nice to see them rounded up in one place. Also I have no life.

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Ars Technica had a go with YouTube Gaming and really likes it. “A slick interface, huge user base, and tons of content should have Twitch worried.”

From Public Libraries Online: What Google’s Algorithm Change Means for Library Web Sites.

Wired: The Glaring Hole in Twitter’s New Shared Blocking Feature. “While the intentions are good, the implementation is bafflingly underwhelming, especially coming from a marquee technology company. In fact, even calling it ‘shared’ blocking at all is a misnomer, because there is no sharing mechanism to speak of. Rather, the CSV file is provided, speeding up the volume at which the blocks can be instituted, but the sharing of that file has to happen through some other third-party service—Dropbox, Pastebin, email attachments, or even handing off physical USB drives.”

Yahoo and 7-UP are teaming up to stream the Electric Daisy Carnival Las Vegas. “Yahoo will connect 7UP with music fans around the live stream of EDC Las Vegas on Yahoo Screen on desktop, and through the Yahoo Screen App on iOS and Android and connected devices including Apple TV, Roku and Xbox. For the first time, fans will also be able to create personalized schedules with their favorite artists and receive real time notifications when their favorite DJs take the stage through a new experience from Yahoo and 7UP on Tumblr, the EDC Dream Stream.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

We’re going to need bigger pipes: Cisco forecasts that by 2019, 80% of Internet traffic will be video. “By 2019, video will account for 80% of all IP traffic, forecasts Cisco. That’s a 13% increase from last year when it accounted for 67%. The highest traffic-generating countries in five years time will be the U.S. and China, with 85% of America’s Internet consumption dominated by video.”

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Maryland, South Carolina, Bing, More: Tuesday Afternoon Buzz, June 16th, 2015

NEW RESOURCES

The state of Maryland now has an online database for certified pesticide dealers and businesses. If you click on the link in the article you’ll get an error. Take the period off the end of the URL and you’ll get to the right place.

The state of South Carolina has a new online database showing which companies get the most business from the state government. Blue Cross Blue Shield of South Carolina was #1. “The next-highest vendor totals were: pharmacy benefit manager Catamaran PBM of Illinois with $329 million in business, healthcare company Medco Health Solutions of New Jersey with $303 million, BlueChoice Healthplan of South Carolina with $71.4 million, Bank of America with $51.2 million, printing business RL Bryan Company with $51.1 million, and law firm Nexsen Pruet, LLC with $49 million.”

The Library of Congress has released three new Student Discovery Sets. “The Library’s latest Student Discovery Sets are available now for the iPad and can be downloaded free of charge on iBooks. These sets cover Women’s Suffrage, Japanese American Internment, and Political Cartoons and Public Debates. They join nine previously published sets on the U.S. Constitution, Symbols of the United States, Immigration, the Dust Bowl, the Harlem Renaissance, Understanding the Cosmos, the Industrial Revolution, Jim Crow and Segregation, and Children’s Lives at the Turn of the 20th Century. Through a set of interactive tools, learners can zoom in on faces of suffragists picketing the White House, circle details of lively 19th-century political cartoons, and listen to stories of Japanese American combat veterans.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Bing is going to encrypt search traffic by default. “Bing has already been offering users the option to encrypt search traffic for about a year and a half now. Beginning this summer, we will begin the process of encrypting search traffic by default. This means that traffic originating from Bing will increasingly come from https://www.bing.com as opposed to http://www.bing.com.”

Snapchat now offers 2-factor authentication. Guess what really huge major consumer Web site still doesn’t? Dingdingdingdingding! AMAZON!

USEFUL STUFF

How-To-Geek on managing a bunch of social media feeds in one place. Alternion looks interesting.

Good one from Hongkiat: 10 Useful Image Tools Every Social Media Marketer Needs. Or anybody who’s just trying to make social media images of the appropriate sizes without tearing all their hair out.

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

FOSS Force takes a look at why SourceForge is such a mess. Makes me sad. Good afternoon, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Video Watchdog, Google Sheets, Wikipedia, More: Tuesday Morning Buzz, June 16th, 2015

Question: do any of y’all use Tumblr? I’m thinking of using it for a ResearchBuzz linkblog so that I can put up and tag individual items. I don’t want to do that here since it would lead to 20+ posts a day and probably really, really irritate the people who are getting e-mail update notices! Leo Notenbloom and I are discussing this on Facebook; feel free to join us.

NEW RESOURCES

Aviation Week & Space Technology is getting a digital archive. “The digital archive, scheduled for completion in early 2016, will comprise more than 500,000 pages of articles, photographs and advertisements chronicling the first century of the aerospace and defense industry, unlocked and made available for the very first time. The archive will be dynamically updated into the future as new Aviation Week content is developed.”

The publication Video Watchdog is making its entire online archive free until the end of June.

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Google is getting rid of Chrome’s horrible new bookmark manager.

More Google: Google Sheets is getting some nice updates. Love the filtering and the warning when users try to change locked content.

USEFUL STUFF

In case you’re looking for options: the 6 easiest video editing tools. The only one I’ve had any experience with is Animoto, but I have used that for literally years. If you’re looking for a Web app that will let you turn a bunch of pictures and video snippets into something that looks classy without it taking hours, Animoto is great. It needs more themes though.

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

Good heavens. Mega has published its first transparency report. “The report, which details activities up until March 2015, focuses on content removal requests and third-party requests for information related to Mega’s users.”

Google is launching an Android Security Rewards program. “Google has assigned a $500 bounty on ‘Moderate’ severity bugs, but will double that to $1,000 for ‘High’ severity and hand over $2,000 for ‘Critical’ bugs.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Billionaire and Twitter investor Prince Alwaleed bin Talal does not support Jack Dorsey as permanent CEO of Twitter. “The Saudi billionaire said Twitter needed a new leader with extensive marketing experience, who would prioritise winning new users.” Far be it from me to disagree with a prince… but I’m disagreeing with a prince. UPDATE: Prince Alwaleed thinks Jack Dorsey is totally awesome and would be super okay with him being Twitter CEO. He might have phrased it slightly differently.

Twitter is increasing its Direct Message limit to 10,000 characters.

Wikipedia is going to start using https connections for all users.

The Human Resource Development (HRD) Ministry in India is setting up a digital library. “As per the official sources, e-content of every subject will be available to students in English, Hindi as well as other Indian languages. Students can easily access digital content through personal computer, laptop, smart-phone and tablet.” Three phases, first phase not complete until 2017, which is why it’s under this heading instead of “new resources.”

Wired: The Web Will Either Kill Science Journals or Save Them.

RESEARCH AND OPINION

How do people even get around to thinking about these things? The most persuasive font. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Australia, Africa, Amazon, More: Sunday Buzz, June 14th, 2015

NEW RESOURCES

The National Archives of Australia has begun a project of digitizing World War I records. “The National Archives of Australia (NAA) has begun a $3.4 million project to mark the centenary of World War I, describing and digitising many of the Anzacs’ repatriation records, ensuring greater public access…. Director-General of the Archives, David Fricker said the details were preserved in more than 600,000 World War I repatriation records, held by the NAA.” “Anzacs” stands for The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps.

Genealogists! Some of the sessions from the Global Family Reunion have been archived online.

USEFUL STUFF

I had no idea there was an online presidential library program. It’s called Connecting Presidential Collections. “A free online site for centralized document searching across presidential collections, CPC is housed at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center. It works to enhance presidential sites and library materials by providing a consolidated source of information for researchers and learners. Documents may be searched by topic, presidency, partner library, collection, creator or date.” Anyway, this article is about The Ulysses S. Grant Library at Mississippi State University joining the project.

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

WIPO – World Intellectual Property Organization – is expanding its plans to provide access to trademark tools and databases in Africa. “The next major project to be delivered is funded by the Japanese government (which has established a trust fund with WIPO that is valued at approximately $1 million a year and intended exclusively to fund activities that improve IP systems in Africa), with a key objective of digitising the IP records – trademarks, designs and patents – of all 19 of ARIPO’s member states.” “ARIPO” stands for African Regional Intellectual Property Organization, and you can get information on its member states via Wikipedia.

Hey! Amazon released a transparency report. “Stephen Schmidt, chief information security officer for Amazon Web Services, said in a blog post that Amazon does not disclose customer information to the government unless it complies with a ‘legally valid and binding order,’ and notifies customers about requests unless prohibited or there is clear criminal activity in evidence.”

Mozilla is paying higher bug bounties. “Mozilla’s new maximum award has been set to $10,000 (up from $3,000), and moderate vulnerabilities may now be worth a reward.”

The OPM hack of federal government employees is much, much worse than originally thought. “Deeply personal information submitted by U.S. intelligence and military personnel for security clearances – mental illnesses, drug and alcohol use, past arrests, bankruptcies and more – is in the hands of hackers linked to China, officials say.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Reddit, after several years of being pretty much a free-for-all, is now banning subreddits. I’m not going to name them here because as you might expect they’re offensive. I’m also not linking to some of the reaction articles because they’re worse.

VentureBeat has a retrospective on Dick Costolo’s five years as Twitter CEO. “After all, Twitter still has incredible recognition around the world. At the same time, as someone who has used Twitter since December 2007, I find myself turning to it much less than Facebook. For some live events, it’s great. But even then, the flood of tweets can be a bit useless and chaotic.” It is completely useless and chaotic without third party apps. I use Twitter for conversation some, but mostly for content discovery, and for that even TweetDeck is crap. Instead, I have relied on ListiMonkey (killed by Twitter’s API changes), Undrip (killed by lack of money, looks like), and now Nuzzel, which I desperately hope doesn’t get killed by anything. Twitter needs to show much more love to developers.

Apparently NPR is on the road to break even because of podcasts. This drives me absolutely wild. Not NPR breaking even, but because this is yet one more proof of how strong and popular podcasts are, and yet there is still not a search engine for them that’s worth a tinker’s dam. Someone please tell me I’m wrong. Tell me about a good one.

Google has launched Sidewalk Labs to tackle the problems of urban areas. “Led by former Bloomberg CEO Dan Doctoroff, New York-based Sidewalk Labs is focused on tackling issues like cost of living, transportation, energy usage and more.”

More Google: Google Play is now offering a “free app of the week”. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!