Blog Archives

Wolfram|Alpha, Fold3, Flickr, More: Morning Buzz, November 12th, 2014

From How-To Geek: How to find and remove duplicate files on any operating system.

Wolfram|Alpha now offers step-by-step solutions for definite integrals.

Greenbot compares Google’s Inbox to the regular ol’ GMail app. Haven’t tried Inbox yet. After reading this article I’m not rushing off to do so, either…

Marketing Land looks at a possible different direction for Google Glass. “Whether or not Google wants to publicly admit it, the company knows it’s not a home run in its current form. Perhaps that’s why Google is taking a big gamble on a shadowy little startup called Magic Leap. Magic Leap, Inc., a Florida-based software development company, has raised $542 million in series B funding led by Google Inc., with participation from several other well-known venture capital firms.”

Amazon Cloud Drive now has its own API.

Mozilla has launched an Oculus-compatible virtual reality site. Anybody remember VRML?

YouTube has struck a licensing deal with many small record labels. I guess this means we’ll be seeing a streaming music service any day now —

Yahoo Japan has started a genomics analysis service.”The service allows users to investigate disease risk factors including 22 different kinds of cancers, diabetes, cardiac infarction, cerebral stoke, etc. as well as physical condition factors such as muscle strength, blood pressure, amount of alcohol intake, blood urate level, etc. It can analyze about 290 items, and even conduct family analysis telling where a group with the same gene as yours originated and its migration over time.”

Fold3 is offering free access to its World War II collection through the end of the month.

Interesting! Flickr is offering a free travel photography Webinar. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

100% Googly: Morning Buzz, October 30th, 2014

It ended up that the first five items I pulled last night/this morning to write about were all about Google, so I decided to make this issue 100% about Google and its properties. If you are not a fan, you can skip. The Afternoon Buzz will be the usual varied selection. Thank you!

Want to try Google Inbox but don’t have an invite? You’ve got options.

More Google: it wants to Halloweenify your photos.

More More Google: Google Glass has been completely banned from movie theatres.

Sorry, I’m getting really Googly here: Google has released a new bookmark manager for Chrome.

Okay, I give up, this Buzz is going to be 100% Google: a cat showed up on Google Maps.

Thought-provoking article: Is Google responsible for delivering accurate and truthful search results?

Hoo boy: malware updating via GMail draft. “With the Gmail drafts folder open and hidden, the malware is programmed to use a Python script to retrieve commands and code that the hacker enters into that draft field. The malware responds with its own acknowledgments in Gmail draft form, along with the target data it’s programmed to exfiltrate from the victim’s network. All the communication is encoded to prevent it being spotted by intrusion detection or data-leak prevention. The use of a reputable web service instead of the usual IRC or HTTP protocols that hackers typically use to command their malware also helps keep the hack hidden.”

Google’s anti-piracy algo is apparently doing its job.

Wondering what Google’s DeepMind startup has been up to? Here ya go. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Wisconsin, Scholarly Papers, Rock Art, More: Morning Buzz, October 11th, 2014

UC Irvine has won a grant to grow a brain cell activity database. “Researchers at UC Irvine will study brain cell activity in disorders such as Lou Gehrig’s disease to create a digital library of information that it is hoped will help lead to treatments.”

So how many scholarly papers are on the Web, anyway? “Using statistical methods, [Lee] Giles and [Madian] Khabsa estimated that at least 114 million English-language scholarly documents are accessible on the Web, of which Google Scholar has nearly 100 million. They estimate that at least 27 million (24 percent) are freely available since they do not require a subscription or payment of any kind. The estimates are limited to English documents only.”

Papers from six Nobel Prize winners are now freely available through the end of the year. “Research papers published by six 2014 Nobel Prize recipients whose accomplishments in physics and chemistry have been enabled by photonics are being made freely available in the SPIE Digital Library through the end of 2014.”

There is now a way to schedule your Instagram posts.

A new public portal provides information about endangered resources in Wisconsin. “The Natural Heritage Inventory Public Portal is a free, online mapping application available to anyone who owns land or is an authorized representative of property in Wisconsin. The public portal allows individuals to complete an Endangered Resources Preliminary Assessment. … Now, the preliminary assessment provides an instant record and summary of the project, a map of the project area and determining results based on the impact to endangered resources. These results will indicate to a landowner if they need to continue by requesting an ER Review.”

The British Museum has acquired the TARA archive. No, not me. TARA stands for Trust for African Rock Art. “TARA’s 25,000-image-strong digital archive has been acquired by the British Museum and will be cataloged and made available online over the next five years, the Telegraph reports. By joining TARA’s efforts, the British Museum seeks to ensure that African rock art sites are recorded and preserved for future generations.”

Google’s “Right to be Forgotten” has hit the New York Times. “Over the weekend, the NY Times revealed that it is the latest publication to receive notification from Google that some of its results will no longer show up for searches on certain people’s names, under the whole “right to be forgotten” nuttiness going on in Europe these days. As people in our comments have pointed out in the past, it’s important to note that the stories themselves aren’t erased from Google’s index entirely — they just won’t show up when someone searches on the particular name of the person who complained. Still, the whole effort is creating a bit of a Streisand Effect in calling new attention to the impacted articles.”

From the Buffer blog – 23 tools and resources to create images for social media.

Twitter has sued the US government for the right to be more transparent. “After months of attempted negotiations, the company has filed a lawsuit on Tuesday, alleging that the restrictions imposed by the government — which regulate what Twitter can publish about national security related surveillance requests — violate its First Amendment rights.”

IFTTT now has a Sina Weibo channel. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

TwitPic, Google, CIA, More: Brief Afternoon Buzz, September 19th, 2014

(Happy Talk Like a Pirate Day, Mateys!)

Twitter is getting more like Facebook and now apparently Facebook is getting more like Twitter. I’m not too chuffed about either of those things. “Facebook wants to steal discussion of real-time events from Twitter and stop being perceived as a slow social network. So today it announced News Feed changes that will surface posts that mention Trending Topics sooner and higher in the feed.”

Ready to upgrade to iOS 8? It’s a huge download. Here’s how to handle it.

TwitPic has been acquired and will soldier on.

The CIA has posted hundreds of declassified journal articles. “The documents, posted on the agency’s website Thursday, are from ‘Studies in Intelligence,’ the CIA’s in-house professional journal. The publication’s mission is ‘to stimulate within the Intelligence Community the constructive discussion of important issues of the day, to expand knowledge of lessons learned from past experiences, to increase understanding of the history of the profession, and to provide readers with considered reviews of public literature concerning intelligence,’ the agency said.”

The Loeb Classical Library has gone digital (but it’ll cost you.) Hat tip to @LibraryStuff.

Google’s going to be showing you a lot more photos. “Abby from Google quietly announced in the Google Maps Help forum that those who share photos publicly and have location data on the photos within Google+ may find their photos automatically within Google Views and Photo Sphere.”

Yahoo is going on the road. Good afternoon, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Apps, GPO, GIFs, More: Morning Buzz, September 11th, 2014

From an archiving point of view — physical diaries versus digital calendars. This is “diaries” in the British sense… I think we’d say “appointment books” here in the US.

Like something you see on Google Hangouts? Now you can applaud.

The first digital library from the GPO depository program has gone live in North Dakota. “The library, part of North Dakota’s Sitting Bull College servicing the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation community, ‘is opting to meet their community’s needs by developing an online government information collection,’ a release from the GPO said. ‘In choosing this format, the library will not receive print materials from GPO.'”

Google Hangouts now offers free voice calls. “Starting today you can make voice calls from Hangouts on Android, iOS and the web. It’s free to call other Hangouts users, it’s free to call numbers in the U.S. and Canada, and the international rates are really low. So keeping in touch is easier and more affordable than ever.”

Adobe and Microsoft have both pushed out a bunch of critical fixes — get patchin’ y’all!

Well, crap. There’s been a leak of 5 million GMail names and passwords. Based on an article in The Mary Sue, however, looks like this data might be pretty old. Still… turned on 2-factor lately?

The state of Florida has created an online database of prison deaths. “The database lists inmates by name, prison, race and manner of death, and supplies other details that the Miami Herald had been trying to obtain from the department since May, when the newspaper began a series of articles about prison deaths.”

Wow! Check out these animated GIFs made from archival photos at the Library of Congress. Creeeeepy.

Facebook is apparently testing a feature that lets you schedule the deletion of your posts in advance.

Can you imagine getting coupons or other promotional material based on predicted behavior? Using tweets and other data to forecast behavior. “Some people are very careful about what data they give out, but the algorithms can work pretty well with anonymized data. Usable predictions can be made more than 60 percent of the time, if the right data are aggregated. And that data isn’t just coming from social media: Think about sources such as credit card transactions, monitored telephone calls, e-mail, GPS data.”

From Hongkiat: 10 Handy Pinterest Tools for Business.

CTIA has tested 1,000 apps for KnowMyApp.org (PRESS RELEASE). “Launched in December 2013, KnowMyApp.org informs customers how much data their favorite apps use before they download them while also providing app developers with resources to build more data-efficient apps. Testing the top paid and free apps from both the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores as well app submissions directly from developers, Intertek, the leading quality solutions provider to industries worldwide, tests and provides information to consumers on: How the app was tested; How much data is used when downloaded, when opened initially, during active run time and background time; How the app impacts data plans (i.e., 300MB, 1GB, 2GB and 4GB); and How users can conserve data usage.” Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Google Forms, About.com, Getty, More: Morning Buzz, September 3rd, 2014

FamilySearch is offering a free Webinar on doing South Africa research.

Google Forms is finally offering themes. About time.

Google Enterprise has changed its name to Google for Work.

Have you shopped at Home Depot lately? You may want to keep an eye on your credit card.

Reddit has launched an AMA app.

YouTube creators can now get “tips” from fans.

Interesting: Tocomail gives parents controls for a teen’s GMail account.

About.com is getting a redesign. Remember when it was called The Mining Company?

Catching up … the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names has been released as linked open data. “The Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names is a resource of over 2,000,000 names of current and historical places, including cities, archaeological sites, nations, and physical features. It focuses mainly on places relevant to art, architecture, archaeology, art conservation, and related fields.”

From the Washington Post: three ways to step up your own cloud security. And the reason Amazon still doesn’t offer two-factor is…. ?

FamilySearch: now with another heapin’ helpin’ of records. “Notable collection updates include the 1,703,079 indexed records from the Jamaica, Civil Registration, 1880–1999, collection; the 2,522,767 indexed records and images from the United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980–2014, collection; and the 852,481 indexed records from U.S., New York, Passenger Lists, 1820–1891, collection. “

NARA is going to host its second virtual genealogy fair at the end of October.

Bing Maps: now with much more South Korea data.

Sigh: Hackers are using Google’s VirusTotal to test their attacks. This is why we can’t have nice things. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Facebook, Twitter, Aereo, More: Morning Buzz, June 30, 2014

File hosting site Bayfiles has apparently been completely removed from Google’s search results. And the Bayfiles operators claim they have no idea why. “The most likely explanation is that Google found Bayfiles guilty of some sort of violation for which the site has been removed from Google as a penalty. What type of violation that might be remains a mystery to the site’s operators.”

From How-To Geek: 5 Ways to Access Your PC’s Files Over the Internet.

Because you can, but don’t get ridiculous: how to host a Web site with Raspberry Pi.

Interesting. Researchers have created an algorithm that makes highlight reels from long videos.

Fun with Hongkiat: 15 Tips to Get More Out of Dropbox.

The Next Web has a story on Dave Winer’s Twitter tool, Happy Friends. “Happy Friends is a mailbox-like reader for organizing the feeds of your Twitter friends. You sign into your Twitter account on the Happy Friends site, add your favorite Twitter feeds via the Friends dropdown in the menu bar and those friends will appear in the white box. Double click on a friend’s name and you see their recent tweets.” I adore this idea and wish I had more time to play with it.

Digital Trends has a substantial article on Aereo alternatives. I have read several such articles over the last few days and this is one of the few that a) gives a lot of hardware alternatives and b) mentions Plex, so in it goes.

I think Aaron T told me about this… thanks Aaron! It’s an article about using Google Voice to hear students proofreading their papers. “The intent of this is to have students provide proof that they have read their papers aloud as part of the proofreading process. ” The article also mentions Speak Pipe, another option for hearing students proofreading papers.

Here’s an article on that massive Facebook psychology study from the Atlantic (it was updated last night.) Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

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