Lenovo, NOAA, Medium, More: Wednesday Morning Buzz, April 22nd, 2015

NEW RESOURCES

A guy who lost his job because of offensive tweets has created a new app so the same thing doesn’t happen to other people. “The app, releasing publicly Monday, scours a user’s Twitter, Facebook and Instagram histories for potentially inflammatory or damaging posts, and makes their removal a breeze. It’s designed for the next generation in the workforce, who grew up sharing vast amounts of information online, some of which may become a liability in their future careers.”

Another historic newspaper, this time from New York, is available online. “Nate Austin, director of the library, said The Allegany Citizen was printed between March 21, 1896, and Dec. 16, 1976, and carried news and articles from the town and village of Allegany. The newspaper was printed in a building across from the library on West Main Street. ”

USEFUL STUFF

Own a Lenovo laptop? The laptop battery recall of a little more than a year ago has Been expanded to over 160,000 units from the original 37,000 units. Check your machine.

Want to watch YouTube videos without related content? You’ve got a few options.

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Twitter is expanding who can send and receive DMs.

Google has brought information about Robben Island, a South Africa historical site, online.

Google has introduced a rule that Web sites must be mobile-friendly or suffer in Google’s rankings. Wired has an overview. For the record, ResearchBuzz is, according to Google’s assessment tool, mobile friendly.

The NOAA has expanded its coastal flooding information tool. “A NOAA flood exposure risk mapping tool that was developed in New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Pennsylvania has now been expanded to cover coastal areas along the entire U.S. East Coast and Gulf of Mexico.”

Google Takeout is letting you export more stuff. Is this an early attempt to defuse accusations of a monopoly or am I just being cynical?

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Congratulations to TidBITS for 25 wonderful years!

RESEARCH AND OPINION

Dutch organizations are warning that the Internet is not a reliable archive. Yeah. And?

Chris Abraham wants you to try Medium. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Bing, FamilySearch, Google, More: Afternoon Buzz, February 7th, 2015

Bing’s got a guide to the GRAMMYs and a bunch of predictions too.

Anytime anyone says “PowerPoint alternative” I just get all happy. Check out Bunkr. Read the comments on this article, though: I do agree about an offline mode.

YouTube has released a blog post of Super Bowl viewing stats.

Mashable has a brief overview of Tumblr’s new features.

FamilySearch has a new record add. “Notable collection updates include the 2,259,307 indexed records and images from the U.S., Massachusetts, Boston Passenger Lists, 1820–1891 collection; the 392,161 images from the United States, Freedmen’s Bureau, Records of the Assistant Commissioner, 1865–1872 collection; and the 49,136 indexed records from the El Salvador Civil Registration, 1704–1977 collection. ”

Windows XP and Windows 7 stubbornly hold on to market share, according to article in PC World (Warning! PC World!)

Ars Technica is reporting about a potentially-dangerous security bug in Internet Explorer. “The vulnerability is known as a universal cross-site scripting (XSS) bug. It allows attackers to bypass the same origin policy, a crucially important principle in Web application models that prevents one site from accessing or modifying browser cookies or other content set by any other site. A proof-of-concept exploit published in the past few days shows how websites can violate this rule when people use supported versions of Internet Explorer running the latest patches to visit maliciously crafted pages.”

Rumors: is Apple planning its own search engine? “After initially being the best of friends, Apple and Google are in the midst of a not-so-cold war, thanks largely to Mountain View’s decision to get involved in the smartphone battle. That’s led to Apple reducing its reliance on Google, even doing things that upset its users like removing Google Maps and YouTube as default iOS apps. More subtle changes have come through Siri, which taps services like Bing, Yahoo and Wikipedia for information, rather than Google. These small changes have helped marginalize Google’s hold on iOS users, and flipping the switch on Apple Search in Safari would be a continuation of its efforts in this area.”

Google Registry has launched the .HOW domain. “We believe .HOW can become an intuitive way for creators and consumers to share, identify and discover some of the best learning content on the web. Now you can buy a simple, memorable and meaningful .HOW domain name of your own, sending a clear message that your content is there to teach people something great.”

More Google: Google and Twitter are getting together again, with tweets to start showing up in Google’s search engine. “In the first half of this year, tweets will start to be visible in Google’s search results as soon as they’re posted, thanks to a deal giving the Web company access to Twitter’s firehose, the stream of data generated by the microblogging service’s 284 million users, people with knowledge of the matter said Wednesday. Google previously had to crawl Twitter’s site for the information, which will now be visible automatically.” Good afternoon, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Wolfram|Alpha, Fold3, Flickr, More: Morning Buzz, November 12th, 2014

From How-To Geek: How to find and remove duplicate files on any operating system.

Wolfram|Alpha now offers step-by-step solutions for definite integrals.

Greenbot compares Google’s Inbox to the regular ol’ GMail app. Haven’t tried Inbox yet. After reading this article I’m not rushing off to do so, either…

Marketing Land looks at a possible different direction for Google Glass. “Whether or not Google wants to publicly admit it, the company knows it’s not a home run in its current form. Perhaps that’s why Google is taking a big gamble on a shadowy little startup called Magic Leap. Magic Leap, Inc., a Florida-based software development company, has raised $542 million in series B funding led by Google Inc., with participation from several other well-known venture capital firms.”

Amazon Cloud Drive now has its own API.

Mozilla has launched an Oculus-compatible virtual reality site. Anybody remember VRML?

YouTube has struck a licensing deal with many small record labels. I guess this means we’ll be seeing a streaming music service any day now —

Yahoo Japan has started a genomics analysis service.”The service allows users to investigate disease risk factors including 22 different kinds of cancers, diabetes, cardiac infarction, cerebral stoke, etc. as well as physical condition factors such as muscle strength, blood pressure, amount of alcohol intake, blood urate level, etc. It can analyze about 290 items, and even conduct family analysis telling where a group with the same gene as yours originated and its migration over time.”

Fold3 is offering free access to its World War II collection through the end of the month.

Interesting! Flickr is offering a free travel photography Webinar. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

100% Googly: Morning Buzz, October 30th, 2014

It ended up that the first five items I pulled last night/this morning to write about were all about Google, so I decided to make this issue 100% about Google and its properties. If you are not a fan, you can skip. The Afternoon Buzz will be the usual varied selection. Thank you!

Want to try Google Inbox but don’t have an invite? You’ve got options.

More Google: it wants to Halloweenify your photos.

More More Google: Google Glass has been completely banned from movie theatres.

Sorry, I’m getting really Googly here: Google has released a new bookmark manager for Chrome.

Okay, I give up, this Buzz is going to be 100% Google: a cat showed up on Google Maps.

Thought-provoking article: Is Google responsible for delivering accurate and truthful search results?

Hoo boy: malware updating via GMail draft. “With the Gmail drafts folder open and hidden, the malware is programmed to use a Python script to retrieve commands and code that the hacker enters into that draft field. The malware responds with its own acknowledgments in Gmail draft form, along with the target data it’s programmed to exfiltrate from the victim’s network. All the communication is encoded to prevent it being spotted by intrusion detection or data-leak prevention. The use of a reputable web service instead of the usual IRC or HTTP protocols that hackers typically use to command their malware also helps keep the hack hidden.”

Google’s anti-piracy algo is apparently doing its job.

Wondering what Google’s DeepMind startup has been up to? Here ya go. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Wisconsin, Scholarly Papers, Rock Art, More: Morning Buzz, October 11th, 2014

UC Irvine has won a grant to grow a brain cell activity database. “Researchers at UC Irvine will study brain cell activity in disorders such as Lou Gehrig’s disease to create a digital library of information that it is hoped will help lead to treatments.”

So how many scholarly papers are on the Web, anyway? “Using statistical methods, [Lee] Giles and [Madian] Khabsa estimated that at least 114 million English-language scholarly documents are accessible on the Web, of which Google Scholar has nearly 100 million. They estimate that at least 27 million (24 percent) are freely available since they do not require a subscription or payment of any kind. The estimates are limited to English documents only.”

Papers from six Nobel Prize winners are now freely available through the end of the year. “Research papers published by six 2014 Nobel Prize recipients whose accomplishments in physics and chemistry have been enabled by photonics are being made freely available in the SPIE Digital Library through the end of 2014.”

There is now a way to schedule your Instagram posts.

A new public portal provides information about endangered resources in Wisconsin. “The Natural Heritage Inventory Public Portal is a free, online mapping application available to anyone who owns land or is an authorized representative of property in Wisconsin. The public portal allows individuals to complete an Endangered Resources Preliminary Assessment. … Now, the preliminary assessment provides an instant record and summary of the project, a map of the project area and determining results based on the impact to endangered resources. These results will indicate to a landowner if they need to continue by requesting an ER Review.”

The British Museum has acquired the TARA archive. No, not me. TARA stands for Trust for African Rock Art. “TARA’s 25,000-image-strong digital archive has been acquired by the British Museum and will be cataloged and made available online over the next five years, the Telegraph reports. By joining TARA’s efforts, the British Museum seeks to ensure that African rock art sites are recorded and preserved for future generations.”

Google’s “Right to be Forgotten” has hit the New York Times. “Over the weekend, the NY Times revealed that it is the latest publication to receive notification from Google that some of its results will no longer show up for searches on certain people’s names, under the whole “right to be forgotten” nuttiness going on in Europe these days. As people in our comments have pointed out in the past, it’s important to note that the stories themselves aren’t erased from Google’s index entirely — they just won’t show up when someone searches on the particular name of the person who complained. Still, the whole effort is creating a bit of a Streisand Effect in calling new attention to the impacted articles.”

From the Buffer blog – 23 tools and resources to create images for social media.

Twitter has sued the US government for the right to be more transparent. “After months of attempted negotiations, the company has filed a lawsuit on Tuesday, alleging that the restrictions imposed by the government — which regulate what Twitter can publish about national security related surveillance requests — violate its First Amendment rights.”

IFTTT now has a Sina Weibo channel. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!