Blog Archives

Malta, Penguins, Clinical Research, More: Morning Buzz, September 30th, 2014

The University of Malta will launch an online institutional repository. “This online archive will collect, preserve and disseminate a variety of scholarly material produced under the University’s auspices. National intellectual output and heritage will also be accepted for submission to the archive.”

Many thanks to Saundra F. who gave me a heads-up on the ClinRegs Web site. “Welcome to ClinRegs, an online database of country-specific clinical research regulatory information designed to save time and effort in planning and implementing clinical research. Use the map feature above to obtain a digestible overview of a country’s regulatory requirements, and use the comparison search tool to view two countries’ requirements side-by-side.” ClinRegs is a subset of the NIH.gov site.

Wolfram|Alpha has launched “Tweet a Program”. “Compose a tweet-length Wolfram Language program, and tweet it to @WolframTaP. Our Twitter bot will run your program in the Wolfram Cloud and tweet back the result.”

Google is now 16. You can get nostalgic with all its Google logos.

Yahoo has issued a new transparency report.

New project at Zooniverse! It wants you to spot the penguin.

A digital edition of the entire Warren Commission Report is now available. “The Government Printing Office today released a digital version of the entire Warren Commission report on the assassination of President John. F. Kennedy to commemorate the 50 years since the printed version of the report first rolled off the agency’s presses.”

As spotted by Google Operating System, a new interface for Google Takeout.

It’s often far afield of ResearchBuzz topics, but Smashing Magazine publishes very interesting articles: The Ultimate Guide to Choosing a WordPress host. If you’ve ever wondered what the difference between shared hosting, managed hosting, virtual private servers, etc. this article is for you.

Interesting: The Marketer’s Guide to Facebook Graph Search.

The Interactive Advertising Bureau is going to launch a “tech lab” (PRESS RELEASE). “The IAB Tech Lab will spearhead the development of technical standards, create a code library to assist in rapid, cost-effective implementation of IAB standards, and establish a test platform for companies to evaluate the compatibility of their technology solutions with IAB standards, which for 18 years have been the foundation for interoperability and profitable growth in the digital advertising supply chain.”

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

TwitPic, Google, CIA, More: Brief Afternoon Buzz, September 19th, 2014

(Happy Talk Like a Pirate Day, Mateys!)

Twitter is getting more like Facebook and now apparently Facebook is getting more like Twitter. I’m not too chuffed about either of those things. “Facebook wants to steal discussion of real-time events from Twitter and stop being perceived as a slow social network. So today it announced News Feed changes that will surface posts that mention Trending Topics sooner and higher in the feed.”

Ready to upgrade to iOS 8? It’s a huge download. Here’s how to handle it.

TwitPic has been acquired and will soldier on.

The CIA has posted hundreds of declassified journal articles. “The documents, posted on the agency’s website Thursday, are from ‘Studies in Intelligence,’ the CIA’s in-house professional journal. The publication’s mission is ‘to stimulate within the Intelligence Community the constructive discussion of important issues of the day, to expand knowledge of lessons learned from past experiences, to increase understanding of the history of the profession, and to provide readers with considered reviews of public literature concerning intelligence,’ the agency said.”

The Loeb Classical Library has gone digital (but it’ll cost you.) Hat tip to @LibraryStuff.

Google’s going to be showing you a lot more photos. “Abby from Google quietly announced in the Google Maps Help forum that those who share photos publicly and have location data on the photos within Google+ may find their photos automatically within Google Views and Photo Sphere.”

Yahoo is going on the road. Good afternoon, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Twitter, Nest, IFTTT, More: Morning Buzz, September 5th, 2014

Twitpic is shutting down. This service, which has been around since 2008, is being forced to shut down because Twitter has suddenly gotten a bee in its bonnet about TwitPic’s trademark application, which has been in process since 2009. Twitpic doesn’t have the resources for a legal fight with Twitter. Barf.

Speaking of barfing, Twitter is apparently going to ram a filtered feed, Facebook style, down the throats of its Twitter users. From the article: “The impetus for Twitter to filter is obvious: the service needs to show growth in both number of users and engagement in order to satisfy investors, and finding relevant content as a new user can be a challenge, which is why the company recently updated its so-called ‘on-boarding’ process.” You know, I get that. I really do – Twitter needs new users. But filtering feeds should be an option, not the only way a user’s Twitter feed is available. Otherwise, Twitter is attracting and integrating new users at the cost of alienating and angering its established user base. And there’s a word for that kind of strategy: stupid.

Apparently Google Glass’ partners aren’t all that thrilled about Google Glass either. Too bad we can’t harness PR spin to engage turbines and power cities.

More Google: Google has revealed The Cartographer, its indoor mapping backpack. “As the backpacker walks through a building, the floor plan is automatically generated in real time, Google says. The wearer also uses a tablet to add points of interest while walking around the building (say room numbers in a hotel or the exhibits in a museum).”

WordPress has released WordPress 4.0, “Benny”.

IFTTT now has a Best Buy channel. “The Best Buy Channel enables you to catch products as they become available in stores, follow when their prices change, and watch what the world is browsing today.” Hmm.. dear IFTTT, I would like a Tiger Direct channel, please.

Nest has released a 2.0 software update to its smoke alarm. “In the first major update to its smoke alarm software since the system was introduced last October, Google-acquired Nest Labs has developed a spate of new features designed to keep homes safe from fires and carbon monoxide, and to keep annoying alarms from going off when they shouldn’t be.” Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

WordPress, Bauhaus, Physics, More: Morning Buzz, September 2nd, 2014

Well, there’s a match made in heaven: The Internet Archive has joined Flickr Commons.

Ubuntu 14.10 Beta 1 has been released. (That’s Utopic Unicorn for those of you playing along at home.)

Georgia State University Library has released its WordPress plugin, “Library Instruction Recorder”, as open source.

Infographic: How to get more interaction on Google+. They left off a tip: be way cooler than me.

From Lifehacker: How to turn GMail into your central productivity hub. Well, it’s a nice idea….

Several Bauhaus texts are now available for free.

The Feynman Lectures on Physics are now available in their entirety online and for free. “First presented in the early 1960s at Caltech by the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman, the lectures were eventually turned into a book by Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, and Matthew Sands. The text went on to become arguably the most popular physics book ever written, selling more than 1.5 million copies in English, and getting translated into a dozen languages.”

A TweetDeck for Instagram? Hey, I could handle that. Check out this article on Picdeck.

The federal government is creating a database to track hate speech on Twitter. Hey, you know who I’d like to track hate speech on Twitter? TWITTER ITSELF.

In case you’ve been living under a rock: Amazon has acquired Twitch.

Google Search now understands more than one language at a time.

Pointer from the always-awesome Robin Good: send files up to 5GB without using mail – https://ydray.com/ . Now of course I wouldn’t use this to send anything sensitive, but things like innocuous pictures or videos that happened to be very large? There you go.

Wanna feel old? Browse around these images of first-gen Web sites from the mid-90s. Actually some of them don’t look THAT different from today. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Yahoo, Twitter Bots, NASA, More: Morning Buzz, August 16th, 2014

Catching up… Yahoo has a new Finance app.

A small selection of the University of Vermont’s College of Medicine yearbooks are now available online. The yearbooks are from 1952-1967.

When does Amit Agarwal do an article that isn’t handy and useful? How to transfer files between mobile phones and computers.

You know that handle Google Package Tracking tool? You can opt-out if you like.

Sometimes you say “bots on Twitter” and people will reflexively think they’re bad, pointless, etc. But check out this collection of river gauges on Twitter which tweet their levels twice a day but can increase communications in times of flood or emergency. “Users can visit the website to search by geographical location, river name, catchment area or status (normal level, below average or risk of flooding) and are also able to follow on Twitter any gauges that will be of interest to them. The website map features all of the Environment Agency river level and tidal gauges, and a unique Twitter account has been created for each of them. Twice per day, each gauge tweets its current status. For example, Teddington Lock now has its own Twitter account: https://twitter.com/riverlevel_1182.”

Related: Are 8.5% of Twitter’s active users bots?

The US Department of Energy is making its researchers’ papers free. “The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today unveiled its answer to a White House mandate to make the research papers it funds free for anyone to read: a Web portal that will link to full-text papers a year after they’re published. Once researchers are up to speed and submitting their manuscripts, that will mean 20,000 to 30,000 new free papers a year on energy research, physics, and other scientific topics.”

And in the same vein, NASA is giving away free ebooks.

Congratulations to Search Engine Land, which has a new look! Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Google, Twitter, YouTube, More: Short Saturday Buzz, July 12, 2014

Twitter has released a new set of analytics tools. The article I’m linking to makes them sound kind of like they’re just for advertisers only, but really they’re not. Looking at this and comparing it to Facebook (where the ResearchBuzz fan page has many more “fans” than my Twitter account has “followers” makes Facebook look really, really sad.

From Digital Trends: How to download YouTube videos. (Note that this is not necessarily legal and you should proceed at your own risk.)

Genealogy blogger Myrtle is having a geneasleepover for the FamilySearch worldwide indexing event. It’s a Google Hangout and everybody’s invited.

Google is predicting Germany will win the World Cup.

From Amit: The best services for sharing large files over the Internet.

Saturday fun: a Twitter bot will generate your very own emoji doll. Good afternoon, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Facebook, Twitter, Aereo, More: Morning Buzz, June 30, 2014

File hosting site Bayfiles has apparently been completely removed from Google’s search results. And the Bayfiles operators claim they have no idea why. “The most likely explanation is that Google found Bayfiles guilty of some sort of violation for which the site has been removed from Google as a penalty. What type of violation that might be remains a mystery to the site’s operators.”

From How-To Geek: 5 Ways to Access Your PC’s Files Over the Internet.

Because you can, but don’t get ridiculous: how to host a Web site with Raspberry Pi.

Interesting. Researchers have created an algorithm that makes highlight reels from long videos.

Fun with Hongkiat: 15 Tips to Get More Out of Dropbox.

The Next Web has a story on Dave Winer’s Twitter tool, Happy Friends. “Happy Friends is a mailbox-like reader for organizing the feeds of your Twitter friends. You sign into your Twitter account on the Happy Friends site, add your favorite Twitter feeds via the Friends dropdown in the menu bar and those friends will appear in the white box. Double click on a friend’s name and you see their recent tweets.” I adore this idea and wish I had more time to play with it.

Digital Trends has a substantial article on Aereo alternatives. I have read several such articles over the last few days and this is one of the few that a) gives a lot of hardware alternatives and b) mentions Plex, so in it goes.

I think Aaron T told me about this… thanks Aaron! It’s an article about using Google Voice to hear students proofreading their papers. “The intent of this is to have students provide proof that they have read their papers aloud as part of the proofreading process. ” The article also mentions Speak Pipe, another option for hearing students proofreading papers.

Here’s an article on that massive Facebook psychology study from the Atlantic (it was updated last night.) Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

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