Blog Archives

Twitter, Troubadour Crusade Poetry, More: Morning Buzz, December 9, 2014

According to an article in PC World (Warning! PC World!) Google Translate is going to get more muscle.

Ready for some navel-gazing? Here’s How to analyze all your 2014 tweets.

More Twitter: 10 Twitter Analytics and Visualization Tools.

Created and still developing: an online archive of troubadour crusade poetry. How cool is that? “Researchers from the University of Warwick are editing and collating the first comprehensive archive of troubadour and trouvere poetry and songs covering the Crusades as part of a new Anglo-Italian research project which will open up the lyric poetry of the medieval troubadours and trouveres to its widest-ever audience. The poetry, some of it long forgotten to modern audiences, will be published on the University of Warwick and University of Naples websites complete with translations, information on manuscripts and earlier editions, and details of the historical circumstances of their original composition and performance.”

Theses of Delhi University scholars will be going online. “Delhi University will develop a digital repository of research conducted by its students. The digital repository will be part of the University Grants Commission’s digital database, called Shodhganga repository, and will include doctoral theses and dissertations.”

GMail has some more categories if you poke around a little.

YouTube can now tell you how copyrighted music will affect your video before you upload it. “Say you want to use Boom Clap from TechCrunch friend Charli XCX. You can now check and see that your video will still be viewable worldwide and that ads can appear on your video — but chances are you won’t be able to monetize your video through ads yourself.”

The publication Literary Review has launched an online archive. Looks like a pay service, though print subscribers will get free access.

Facebook has reportedly added the ability to search for individual posts, but I haven’t seen it yet. Repeated attempts to try it have failed, but it’s still rolling out.

FamilySearch has another big update. Looks like most of it’s FindAGrave. “Notable collection updates include the 124,060,301 indexed records from the Find A Grave Index collection; the 830,416 indexed records and images from the US, Michigan Obituaries, 1820–2006 collection; and the 497,490 images from the US, Washington, County Records, 1803–2010 collection.”

There’s an effort underway to crowdsource a list of old NBA games that are available via YouTube. “Corbin Smith of biscutblog has created a Google document for fans to jump in an add any links to old NBA games they know of, and it’s growing rapidly. The list is arranged in chronological order, and is currently at 50+ full basketball games, ranging from an “aggressively truncated” version of Game 1 of the 1954 (!) NBA Finals to a mid-February 2008 Lakers vs. Magic contest. And in between? Playoffs games, Finals games, All-Star games, Rookie-Sophomore games, Jordan games… you name it.”

More Charles Darwin archives are now available online.

Kenya News Agency’s (KNA) multimedia archives are getting digitzed. “The KNA digitization drive aims to scan all multimedia assets and catalog at least 30 per cent of the collection by December 2015. The scanning process will generate a high resolution digital copy of the asset…. Digitization is expected to begin early 2015. The estimated volume of KNA assets is as follows: 500,000 photos, 6,000 hours videos, 20,000 hours audio, 500,000 articles and 40,000 bounded books.”

Yahoo has released its top searches for 2014.. Ebola was the top search, to no one’s surprise ever.

Hmm! Looks like Google has a mortgage calculator. Good morning, Internet..

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Twitter, Javanese, WWII, More: Morning Buzz, December 3, 2014

Twitter now has adjustable photo filters. “Each filter can be double-tapped to reveal an intensity slider so you can lay that sepia effect on heavy or light to get the perfect hipster sheen.” I’m pretty sure “hipster sheen” is Charlie Sheen’s younger brother.

More Twitter: it has released a new suite of anti-harassment tools. “Twitter had made it fairly simple to report spam, but the new tools allow users to report a variety of troubles, including impersonations, harassment, and even self-harm or suicide. In addition, users can report the harassment on behalf of other users, even if they’re not the target themselves, which is a big change.”

A professor at Earlham College is developing a database of translated Javanese gamelan music. “[Marc] Benamou is developing the world’s first searchable database and website containing Javanese gamelan song texts that will be translated into Indonesian and English.”

Now available: a database of FDA warning letters to dietary supplement firms. “Warning letters in the database include those related to good manufacturing practices (GMP) violations; impermissible product claims, such as disease claims; and products containing illegal ingredients. Using the CRN database, companies can search warning letters by date, product name, ingredient, type of violation, and other criteria. So far, the database includes nearly 300 warning letters sent by FDA between January 2008 and August 2014.”

From BizSugar: 15 Tools to Edit Videos for Business.

The First Division Museum at Cantigny Park in Wheaton, Illinois has completed the first phase of a large digitization project (PRESS RELEASE). “The project involved digitizing part of the research center’s extensive microfilm reel collection of the 1st Infantry Division’s WWII battle documents. Researchers, students and the general public now have remote access to WWII-era records of the U.S. Army’s 1st Infantry Division concerning D-Day and other historic battles.” Access is free.

Google has launched a new service that allows you to contribute to keep Google Ads off your favorite Web sites. This feels icky for some reason.

From the always-lovely Larry Ferlazzo: A short list of the best resources for learning how to use Google Docs / Google Drive.

From the also-always-lovely Amit Agarwal, Scraping Web pages with YQL and Apps Script.

Do you remember that old stat that 100 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube each minute? Well, now apparently it’s 300 hours. Yow!

And: Happy Birthday Search Engine Roundtable! And good morning, Internet!

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Arcade Games, Twitter, Disney, More: Sunday Buzz, November 2nd, 2014

Haven’t started writing today and in a few minutes I need to go to work. Sundays are going to be my tough days, I can see that now… #nanowrimo

Harvard Business Review has an excellent article on Twitter called How the Market Ruined Twitter. It’s an articulate discussion of how Twitter went from welcoming to hostile of third-party developers and what that might mean for the company. “In the early days, Twitter clearly owed much of its growth to its open, ecosystem-like approach. That growth would have slowed eventually in any case, but it’s hard not to think Twitter’s prospects as a network and as a societal force would be much greater if it had remained more like an ecosystem and less like a conventional corporation.”

You can now access Facebook via Tor. For some reason.

Disney has apparently patented a piracy-free search engine. Good luck with that. “It’s unclear whether Disney has any plans to implement the patent in the wild. The company currently has a search engine but this only includes links to its own properties.”

FamilySearch has treated us to some more genealogy data. “Notable collection updates include the 2,623,218 indexed records from the US, New York, State Census, 1865 collection; the 178,692 images from the US, Illinois Probate Records, 1819-1988 collection; and the 163,023 images from theUS, Ohio, Trumbull County Records, 1795-2010 collection.”

Citizens of Missouri how have a new tool to track their representatives. “AccessMissouri.org, an online database that tracks voting records of members of the Missouri General Assembly and contributions to lawmakers, went live this week. The website acts as database, aggregating voting information from the House and Senate journals and financial information from the Missouri Ethics Commission.”

So how did the American Folklife Center’s effort to collect Halloween pictures go? Find out here.

Internet Explorer, the world’s most popular browser?. Wow.

Google Flu Trends has a new engine. Not surprising, since last year it did not do a terrific job of modeling trends; in fact it overguessed.

You didn’t have anything to do today anyway: The Internet Archive has launched 900 classic arcade games you can play on your browser. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Reddit, CERN, Food, More: Morning Buzz, October 31st, 2014

Happy Halloween!

Nordstrom has started its own Reddit community. If Reddit manages to do things like this and maintain its sense of identity, it will be pulling off a balancing act worthy of Cirque du Soleil.

IBM and Twitter are teaming up. “Watson, the artificially intelligent IBM supercomputer, can already beat you at Jeopardy. And soon, it will know more than you do about what’s happening on Twitter, too. It’s part of a deal the two companies announced on Wednesday that’s designed to let IBM’s business clients mine the 500 million daily Twitter messages for competitive intel.”

A new app monitors Twitter feeds for suicide warnings. “The Samaritans charity has launched a new app which will notify Twitter users if people they follow on the site appear to be suicidal. Samaritans Radar uses an algorithm to identify key words and phrases which indicate distress.”

The research center CERN has released a large archive of photographs, but needs your help identifying the people, and in some cases the equipment, in them.

A new database of community food policies is now available. “The Growing Food Connections Policy Database is a searchable collection of local public policies that explicitly support community food systems. This database provides policymakers, government staff, and others interested in food policy with concrete examples of local public policies that have been adopted to address a range of food systems issues…”

Ever wonder How much money Facebook loses during an outage?

The UK has opened access to millions of orphaned works. “These works are covered by copyright, but rights holders cannot be found by those who need to seek permission to reproduce them. Under the new scheme, a licence can be granted by the Intellectual Property Office so that these works can be reproduced on websites, in books and on TV without breaking the law, while protecting the rights of owners so they can be remunerated if they come forward.”

Hey! Sketchfab now allows downloading of 3D objects.

Lifehacker breaks down the secret powers of Chrome’s address bar. I use the math trick several times a day. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Twitter, Idaho, NASA, More: Short Sunday Buzz, October 26th, 2014

Groupon has launched a new Yelp competitor called Pages (PRESS RELEASE). You do not want to hear my Groupon horror story.

Microsoft has opened up The Garage. “Microsoft clicked the Genie on Wednesday and invited the whole neighborhood into its online Garage to try out a handful of consumer apps that are still in the works.”

Twitter has launched Digits, a way to sign into apps using phone numbers instead of passwords.

Don’t want to use GMail or Dropbox? Techspot offers some alternatives.

The state of Idaho has launched an online portal for parcel data about Idaho counties (PRESS RELEASE). “Users can choose from two types of parcel standard downloads: public and comprehensive. Public parcel downloads include seven basic data fields, such as parcel unique identifier, date shared, and date that the polygon geometry was last updated. Comprehensive parcel downloads feature the same information as the public downloads plus 47 more data fields, including property descriptions, total assessed value, and value by category.”

Gombe National Park is now on Google Street View.

Don’t care for Google Analytics? Here are 14 alternatives.

Twitpic’s photo archive has been acquired by Twitter, so it’ll stay online for the time being.

NASA has launched a SoundCloud page of clips from historic missions. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Malta, Penguins, Clinical Research, More: Morning Buzz, September 30th, 2014

The University of Malta will launch an online institutional repository. “This online archive will collect, preserve and disseminate a variety of scholarly material produced under the University’s auspices. National intellectual output and heritage will also be accepted for submission to the archive.”

Many thanks to Saundra F. who gave me a heads-up on the ClinRegs Web site. “Welcome to ClinRegs, an online database of country-specific clinical research regulatory information designed to save time and effort in planning and implementing clinical research. Use the map feature above to obtain a digestible overview of a country’s regulatory requirements, and use the comparison search tool to view two countries’ requirements side-by-side.” ClinRegs is a subset of the NIH.gov site.

Wolfram|Alpha has launched “Tweet a Program”. “Compose a tweet-length Wolfram Language program, and tweet it to @WolframTaP. Our Twitter bot will run your program in the Wolfram Cloud and tweet back the result.”

Google is now 16. You can get nostalgic with all its Google logos.

Yahoo has issued a new transparency report.

New project at Zooniverse! It wants you to spot the penguin.

A digital edition of the entire Warren Commission Report is now available. “The Government Printing Office today released a digital version of the entire Warren Commission report on the assassination of President John. F. Kennedy to commemorate the 50 years since the printed version of the report first rolled off the agency’s presses.”

As spotted by Google Operating System, a new interface for Google Takeout.

It’s often far afield of ResearchBuzz topics, but Smashing Magazine publishes very interesting articles: The Ultimate Guide to Choosing a WordPress host. If you’ve ever wondered what the difference between shared hosting, managed hosting, virtual private servers, etc. this article is for you.

Interesting: The Marketer’s Guide to Facebook Graph Search.

The Interactive Advertising Bureau is going to launch a “tech lab” (PRESS RELEASE). “The IAB Tech Lab will spearhead the development of technical standards, create a code library to assist in rapid, cost-effective implementation of IAB standards, and establish a test platform for companies to evaluate the compatibility of their technology solutions with IAB standards, which for 18 years have been the foundation for interoperability and profitable growth in the digital advertising supply chain.”

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

TwitPic, Google, CIA, More: Brief Afternoon Buzz, September 19th, 2014

(Happy Talk Like a Pirate Day, Mateys!)

Twitter is getting more like Facebook and now apparently Facebook is getting more like Twitter. I’m not too chuffed about either of those things. “Facebook wants to steal discussion of real-time events from Twitter and stop being perceived as a slow social network. So today it announced News Feed changes that will surface posts that mention Trending Topics sooner and higher in the feed.”

Ready to upgrade to iOS 8? It’s a huge download. Here’s how to handle it.

TwitPic has been acquired and will soldier on.

The CIA has posted hundreds of declassified journal articles. “The documents, posted on the agency’s website Thursday, are from ‘Studies in Intelligence,’ the CIA’s in-house professional journal. The publication’s mission is ‘to stimulate within the Intelligence Community the constructive discussion of important issues of the day, to expand knowledge of lessons learned from past experiences, to increase understanding of the history of the profession, and to provide readers with considered reviews of public literature concerning intelligence,’ the agency said.”

The Loeb Classical Library has gone digital (but it’ll cost you.) Hat tip to @LibraryStuff.

Google’s going to be showing you a lot more photos. “Abby from Google quietly announced in the Google Maps Help forum that those who share photos publicly and have location data on the photos within Google+ may find their photos automatically within Google Views and Photo Sphere.”

Yahoo is going on the road. Good afternoon, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

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