Blog Archives

Yahoo, Twitter Bots, NASA, More: Morning Buzz, August 16th, 2014

Catching up… Yahoo has a new Finance app.

A small selection of the University of Vermont’s College of Medicine yearbooks are now available online. The yearbooks are from 1952-1967.

When does Amit Agarwal do an article that isn’t handy and useful? How to transfer files between mobile phones and computers.

You know that handle Google Package Tracking tool? You can opt-out if you like.

Sometimes you say “bots on Twitter” and people will reflexively think they’re bad, pointless, etc. But check out this collection of river gauges on Twitter which tweet their levels twice a day but can increase communications in times of flood or emergency. “Users can visit the website to search by geographical location, river name, catchment area or status (normal level, below average or risk of flooding) and are also able to follow on Twitter any gauges that will be of interest to them. The website map features all of the Environment Agency river level and tidal gauges, and a unique Twitter account has been created for each of them. Twice per day, each gauge tweets its current status. For example, Teddington Lock now has its own Twitter account: https://twitter.com/riverlevel_1182.”

Related: Are 8.5% of Twitter’s active users bots?

The US Department of Energy is making its researchers’ papers free. “The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today unveiled its answer to a White House mandate to make the research papers it funds free for anyone to read: a Web portal that will link to full-text papers a year after they’re published. Once researchers are up to speed and submitting their manuscripts, that will mean 20,000 to 30,000 new free papers a year on energy research, physics, and other scientific topics.”

And in the same vein, NASA is giving away free ebooks.

Congratulations to Search Engine Land, which has a new look! Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Yahoo, Space War!, Font Town, More: Tuesday Morning Buzz, April 29, 2014

Sunday it was a zero-day Internet Explorer vulnerability, today it’s a zero-day Flash vulnerability. It has already been patched, so be sure to run your updates.

Alicia Peaker has a brief blog post on building digital exhibits in the classroom wih open source tool Omeka and a few various plugins. She also links to several examples.

Noupe takes a look at font site Font Town. “In the game since 2009, Font Town has recently created ripples . This is mainly due to the service enhancements implemented as well as the rapid growth to over 30,000 fonts and the redesign of their UI. All the fonts hosted are free downloads and the user experience can well be called intuitive, while the actual use of the fonts is not always that straightforward. We have taken a closer look at Font Town and checked whether this is the new world capitol of free fonts.”

Fortune has a quick roundup of 8 of Google’s biggest flops. I’d forgotten about Google Lively!

Yahoo has launched Yahoo Travel. “… an immersive digital magazine that makes those daydreams to getaways near and far a reality, with all the inspiration and information you need right at your fingertips.”

Meh. I’m much more interested in Yahoo’s announcement of Yahoo Live. “Beginning this summer, Yahoo and Live Nation will begin producing the largest collection of U.S. concert live streams on the web: one live concert, every day, 365 days a year.” There will also be additional music content and sports content as well. An intelligent and oblique way to attack Google’s YouTube dominance.

Parks Canada is considering a giant database for its cultural resources. “If the plan proceeds, members of the public would likely have online access for the first time to Parks Canada information about its 700,000 historical objects and reproductions, and 30 million archeological artifacts.”

From Forbes, an article on three Web sites which can show you if you’ve been hacked.

Did you know Wolfram|Alpha has cost of living information? A blog post shows how to use it.

Wow! For the true game geeks: Internet Archive now has Space War! Space War! is… “a 1962 collaboration of multiple students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Playing off the cathode-ray tube of a Digital Equipment PDP-1 (of which less than 60 were sold), this two-player space-battle game has been lauded as a major advancement in computer gaming for over 50 years.”

MyHeritage now has over 5 billion historical records.

Over at Search Engine Land, Will Scott asks: Does Google’s Review Count Inflation Give Them An Unfair Advantage In Local Search? “Next time you’re on a Google+ Local page, check for yourself: does the quantity of reviews boasted match the actual number of reviews? Anecdotally speaking, this seems rare.”

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Yahoo, AOL, More: Skinny Tuesday Buzz, April 22, 2014

Another good one from Social Media Examiner: How to use Twitter hashtags as a prospecting tool.

Yahoo continues to slip on its search share. “It would appear that Yahoo is continuing its long, slow, market-share decline and about to slip into single-digits for the first time. In absolute numbers, however, Yahoo search query volumes were up. So were Yahoo’s rivals.”

Zooniverse has a new crowdsourcing project: Condor Watch. “We need you to look at some photos of condors taken by our motion-activated cameras. By identifying the tag number of each condor and their behavior around the feeding carcass, we can judge if the bird’s eating or social problems can reveal lead poisoning.”

Looks like Pinterest has a big product announcement scheduled for next week.

Nice: 9 Free Books for Learning Data Mining and Data Analysis.

The things I miss working my day job: apparently there was/is an AOL e-mail spoof/hack thing going on. Interesting notes in the comments.

Just in case you need them: How to find stock photos that don’t suck. Good evening, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Norway, IFTTT, White House, More: Friday Afternoon Buzz, January 17, 2014

The National Library of Norway has put over 135,000 in-copyright books online for free — and the authors get paid and everything!

Georgia Tech researchers have analyzed over 45,000 projects on Kickstarter and have developed a list of the phrases that pay (literally).

Happy 13th birthday Wikipedia!

PC World (WARNING! PC WORLD!) offers an IFTTT article 10 IFTTT recipes to make you more productive at work.

Mashable opines that the Yahoo comeback is smoke and mirrors. The comments on ad buying especially resonate with me. As someone who has been buying Google AdWords regularly for a few years (it’s one of the things I do at the warehouse), I’m astonished how much easier it’s been to develop and implement campaigns at Facebook and Google AdWords over time — even FourSquare. But as a small business advertiser, I’m still beating my head against Yahoo.

So Facebook is now offering trending topics — but you still can’t keyword search public posts from the site? AW, C’MON FACEBOOK!

The White House is covering all the bases for a social State of the Union address.

Techmeme is expanding its event listings. They’re still tech, and still expected to be fairly large in scope, but they are not necessarily expected to be Techmeme headline generators. Good afternoon, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Yahoo, Twitter, OLPC, More: Wednesday Buzz, January 8, 2014

Yahoo has launched Yahoo Food and Yahoo Tech. “Like your favorite glossy magazine for the digital world, Yahoo Food and Yahoo Tech marry the elegant design and bold imagery of traditional magazines with immersive bite-sized stories, engaging videos, and stunning photos curated from Flickr and across the web.” I hope this is not a flip-off to the search engine…

Yahoo has also announced Yahoo News Digest, a twice a day summary of news sent to your phone. “Our Digests provide a definitive summary of all the need-to-know news so you can stay on top of what’s happening.” I’m not enthused; these kinds of digests are inevitably too broad for me.

Twitter for Researchers, part #22521: using it to measure how many people make resolutions about substance use and abuse. The last line of the article made me laugh out loud: “In related news, here’s how to set your Twitter account to private.”

More Twitter: It will issue its first quarterly report on February 5th and, naturally, take questions via Twitter.

One Laptop Per Child has announced (via press release) an XO-Learning app store.

Mashable is crowdsourcing attendee photos from CES.

Biz Stone has launched Jelly, which is a mobile app that sounds like a blend of social network and Q&A site. Anybody tried it? I’m intrigued but I have such bad luck asking questions on Quora. Good morning, Internet…

I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Google, Yahoo, Creative Commons, Genealogy, More: Morning Buzz, July 31, 2012

Now available: a map of storm surge data for over 400 storms worldwide: “Needham scoured more than 67 sources to create a database of storm surge heights along the Gulf Coast from 1880 through 2011, including more than 250 surges in the north Atlantic region.”

The Utah Historical Society is starting an online photo archive documenting Topaz, a Utah internment camp for Japanese during WWII. “It has 220 images, showing everything from schoolchildren saying the Pledge of Allegiance to a New Year’s Eve party to agricultural work crews.”

So apparently Google still has some gathered WiFi data after claiming over a year ago that all of it was deleted. The HELL, Google?

TechCrunch has an article about Mashape, which is an API — aggregation? Broker? Hub? Something.

Interim Yahoo CEO Ross Levinsohn has left Yahoo. Kind of surprised about that, unless he wasn’t planning to stick for anything but the CEO slot. And apparently he’s not the only one.

Wanna take a guess about how many Creative Commons-licensed videos are up on YouTube? Try over four million.

You can now Google Chat with multiple people (or you’ll be able to soon — Google’s still rolling out the feature.)

Ubuntu 12.10 has hit Alpha 3.

The National Archives has put up more videos of its genealogy workshops. They’re available at YouTube; there are 23 videos there now.

Now you can timelapse the Earth! “Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute, working with colleagues at Google and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), have adapted their technology for interactively exploring time-lapse imagery to create a tool that enables anyone to easily access 13 years of NASA Landsat images of the Earth’s surface.” Good morning, Internet…

Maps, Yahoo, Rhode Island, More: Morning Buzz, July 17, 2012

A huge map digitization project is nearly finished. “The United States Geological Survey has nearly completed its project to digitize over 200,000 topographical maps and create a free, searchable online archive.” (Look at the maps in the comments.)

The Providence Journal has launched a new tool for tracking new businesses incorporated in Rhode Island.

Is Spool going to Give Facebook a “Read it Later” feature? One can only hope…

Google has added panoramic images of the Antarctic.

Coming in September: an archive devoted to “audiovisual memory in the Mediterranean”.

Congratulations to Googler (ex-Googler) Marissa Mayer for her appointment as the Yahoo CEO. I can’t wait to see what she does with the Yahoo properties. Good morning, Internet…

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