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Federal Register, Geographical, British Library, More: Wednesday Buzz, June 22, 2016

NEW RESOURCES

The Library of Congress has just completed a big Federal Register project. “Where can you get back issues of the Federal Register online? The Law Library of Congress has now completed the collection of historical volumes of the Federal Register available online. The Law Library acquired this collection from William S. Hein & Co., Inc. to make all volumes of the Federal Register available in open access to researchers. The collection starts with the first Federal Register in 1936 and contains all volumes through 1993.”

Geographical, the Royal Geographical Society’s official magazine, has launched a complete digital archive. “Previously, ten years of back issues had been available, but as of today leading institutions including universities, government departments, colleges and libraries will be able to instantly access all issues, dating back to 1935, via the app or online. This allows users to browse more than 600 issues on their preferred device, with IP authentication allowing users access both on and off site.” And as you might guess from that little squib, this is a paid resource.

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

The British Library has announced its BL Labs Competition finalists. They both look great!

Hmm… What’s up with FamilySearch? “Users of FamilySearch started seeing a banner last week indicating the website would shutdown Monday, 27 June 2016 at midnight MDT (2:00am EDT). The banner warned that the shutdown could be as long as 24 hours. The banner stated that the reason was a ‘technical upgrade.’ I assume that means the basic functionality will be unaffected.”

Twitter will allow users to upload longer videos. “Previous video uploads were limited to about 30 seconds, but Twitter users can now create and share videos for up to 140 seconds, the company said. Some video creators will also be able to add a video to their Vine, Twitter adds, transforming their six-second video ‘into a trailer for a bigger story.'”

Instagram has half a billion users. Just let that sit there for a minute. “Just eight months after celebrating its fifth birthday, Instagram is celebrating a new milestone: half a billion monthly active users, 300 million of whom use the photo-sharing service daily.”

USEFUL STUFF

From Spin Sucks: How to identify popular hashtags on Twitter. The article has a PR/marketing slant (as you might guess from the blog title) but using these tools can help you understand how people use language on Twitter, which can make you a better searcher (goodness knows Twitter can be a search challenge.)

From The Guardian: Seven tricks to speed up Google Chrome. Bonus points for mentioning the Turbo switch on the old Pentium 486s.

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Europeana Sounds needs some help identifying the instruments in its recordings. “Have an ear for musical instruments? Use your talent to tag all the instruments you hear in the musical recordings of the Europeana Sounds collections! There are so many historical music recordings in our archives that we just can not describe all the instruments by ourselves. So that’s why we kindly ask your help to tag our beloved music collections with all the instruments that you can hear in a song. The music in Europeana Sounds range from beautiful folk music from Greece to Scandinavian improvised space rock all the way to the sounds coming from Tibetian monastries.”

The New York Times Magazine: How an archive of the Internet could change history. “Building an archive has always required asking a couple of simple but thorny questions: What will we save and how? Whose stories are the most important and why? In theory, the internet already functions as a kind of archive: Any document, video or photo can in principle remain there indefinitely, available to be viewed by anyone with a connection. But in reality, things disappear constantly. Search engines like Google continually trawl for pages to organize and index for retrieval, but they can’t catch everything. And as the web evolves, it becomes harder to preserve. It is estimated that 75 percent of all websites are inactive, and domains are abandoned every day. Links can rot when sites disappear, images vanish when servers go offline and fluctuations in economic tides and social trends can wipe out entire ecosystems.” Thoughtful but unsatisfying; I wanted more explorations of possible solutions.

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

And in our latest episode of “Oh boy here we go again,” Carbonite is telling its users to change their passwords. Doesn’t look like a hack, just another LinkedIn related attack.

RESEARCH AND OPINION

Research: We’ll stay friends with people on Facebook after they die. I have two friends on Facebook who have passed and I wouldn’t dream of unfriending them. “The survey found that only 8 percent of people would unfriend their connection soon afterwards when someone they know on Facebook dies. 40 percent would maintain the friend connection. The survey also found that 50 percent of people did not agree that Facebook is a good way of sharing news of a death beyond the immediate circle of family and friends.” Good morning, Internet…

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News and resources covering social media, search engines, databases, archives, and other such online information collections. Since 1998.

1 Comment on Federal Register, Geographical, British Library, More: Wednesday Buzz, June 22, 2016

  1. Dennis Lien // June 22, 2016 at 2:24 pm // Reply

    re
    NEW RESOURCES

    The Library of Congress has just completed a big Federal Register project. “Where can you get back issues of the Federal Register online? The Law Library of Congress has now completed the collection of historical volumes of the Federal Register available online. The Law Library acquired this collection from William S. Hein & Co., Inc. to make all volumes of the Federal Register available in open access to researchers. The collection starts with the first Federal Register in 1936 and contains all volumes through 1993.”

    ******************
    It might be worthy of note that, while that site takes the FR only up through 1993, the volumes from 1994 to date are also available online per

    http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/serial?id=fedregister

    Denny Lien

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