Nintendo NES, Company Logos, Pocket, More: Tuesday Afternoon Buzz, February 28, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

Now available: a new archive of ephemera about the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), which goes back all the way to when it was still called the Advanced Video System (AVS). “In developing the Foundation’s Digital Library, one need we identified early on was the ability to house special collections – that is, groups of related media, typically all tied together by one subject matter. One of our core beliefs is that historians are missing many of the tools needed to tell the stories of video games, so we felt that collecting an extensive group of digital artifacts related to one subject matter might go far in ‘open sourcing’ telling that subject’s story. Our first special collection is one near and dear to me, having written several articles on the subject myself: The Nintendo USA NES Launch Collection.” It looks like the archive is maintained in a set of Google Drive folders. Wild!

A new Web site aggregates information on logos going back to the 1950s. “Created by a group of Swiss designers, who are now located around the world, Logobook aims to serve as both a resource and an inspiration to design fans. Currently in beta phase, its creators are adding to it all the time.” I kind of love the Z.O.P.P. logo from Poland, 1970.

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

I have no idea how I feel about this: Mozilla has acquired Pocket. “Mozilla is growing, experimenting more, and doubling down on our mission to keep the internet healthy, as a global public resource that’s open and accessible to all. As our first strategic acquisition, Pocket contributes to our strategy by growing our mobile presence and providing people everywhere with powerful tools to discover and access high quality web content, on their terms, independent of platform or content silo.” Please don’t mess it up please don’t mess it up please don’t mess it up.

Search Engine Land: Bing UK now displaying National Health Service data for GP & hospital search queries. “According to the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), the publicly-funded national healthcare system has been working with Bing UK during the last year to improve search results for general practitioner and hospital queries.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

ZDNet: YouTube viewership hits 1 billion hours of video a day. “As the Wall Street Journal first reported, the site reached that milestone in part by powering its recommendations engine with machine learning algorithms. Other factors have contributed to the increase in viewership, including the shift to mobile: A growing number of people have internet access via their mobile devices, and more than 60 percent of YouTube watch time now happens on mobile and tablets.” Just imagine how much more I could be watching if the recommendations engine wasn’t recommending the same videos OVER and OVER and OVER again!

Recode: Facebook plans to lay almost 500 miles of fiber cable in Africa for better wireless internet. “Facebook has a new plan to get more of Africa online: Fiber optic cables. The social giant on Monday announced plans to lay nearly 500 miles of fiber cable in Uganda by the end of the year, infrastructure that Facebook believes will provide internet access for more than three million people.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

It’s not often I read an article relevant to ResearchBuzz that makes me want to punch a wall. Congratulations, History@Work, you did it! (It’s not them, it’s the topic that they brought to my attention.) The title of this bloodboiling item is S.103 threatens digital history initiatives around race. “The power of GIS to illuminate systemic oppression and institutional racism have also attracted the attention of Congress. But not in a way welcome to scholars. On January 11, 2017, Senators Mike Lee (Utah) and Marco Rubio (Florida) introduced S.103–115th Congress, the ‘Local Zoning Decisions Protection Act of 2017.’ The language is blunt: ‘no Federal funds may be used to design, build, maintain, utilize, or provide access to a Federal database of geospatial information on community racial disparities or disparities in access to affordable housing.’ A similar bill was also proposed in the House of Representatives.”

Oh good grief. From Engadget: Connected teddy bears leaked kids’ voices online. “Security researchers have discovered that Spiral Toys’ internet-savvy teddy bears, CloudPets, stored kids’ voice messages to their parents (not to mention names and birthdays) in an insecure, misconfigured database that anyone could access online. While the passwords for the toys’ accounts (over 821,000 of them) were stored in a cryptographic hash, there was no password strength limit — it was trivial to crack many accounts and download voice data at will. And it gets worse.”

Google has let the cat out of the bag about another Windows vulnerability.. “Google’s Project Zero research team has actively been detecting vulnerabilities in Microsoft’s software products for quite some time…. Just a few days ago, it disclosed yet another vulnerability in Windows, however, this time after its standard 90-day deadline had passed. Now, the company has revealed yet another weakness in Microsoft’s software products, and this time, the flaw pertains to Edge and Internet Explorer, which means that it does not only impact Windows 10 but other iterations of the operating system as well.”

OTHER STUFF I THINK IS COOL

Nieman Lab: The Atlantic brings readers into its archives with timelines based on their birthdays. “The Atlantic is 160 years old this year, which has gotten it thinking about ways it can tap its archives. On Monday it launched ‘The Atlantic Life Timeline,’ a feature that lets readers see their lives in the context of events the magazine has covered.” Looks cool both for history and genealogy. Good afternoon, Internet…

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Japanese Animation, Mapped Fossils, Illinois Geology, More: Tuesday Buzz, February 28, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

Now available until the end of 2017: a collection of vintage Japanese animation. “Of special note is the inclusion of Junichi Kouchi’s The Dull Sword, the oldest surviving piece of Japanese animation (circa 1917)…. The archive contains some 64 animated films dated from 1917-1941, as well as profiles of various creators.” I had to use Chrome to translate the site, but after that was able to navigate without difficulty and watch some animation.

From Popular Mechanics (no, really): Check Out An Interactive Map of Every Dinosaur Fossil Found On Earth . “Some engineers have created an interactive map to navigate the overwhelming amount of data created by the Paleobiology Database, a massive collection of information about fossils and related research. The map essentially plots the location of every fossil ever found by scientists, from early mammals to dinosaurs.”

A new Web site provides extensive information on geology in Illinois. “People have been studying what exists beneath Illinois’ surface since the 1830s. This research exists as mountains of careful observations, combined with numerous individual research projects, distilled into three seminal scientific reports published decades ago on paper — crowning achievements of many a career at the Illinois State Geological Survey. Now freed from the book shelf, the collected knowledge of Illinois’ geologic past has been digitized, and released online as ILSTRAT – an interactive resource for the public, industry, and government to understand the rocks beneath our feet. Organized as an editable online database, or wiki, ILSTRAT brings to life the best scientific consensus of how Illinois was built – from the ground down.”

Digirati: Digirati to build Indigenous Digital Archive platform. “Digirati are building a new open source crowdsourcing platform for the Indigenous Digital Archive, a project of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe. The project will enable engagement with authentic public documents of community history, government actions, and civic life in New Mexico. The first phase will focus on open public records related to land and to the government Indian Boarding Schools from the late 1800s into the 1920s and 30s.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

The Guardian: Oxford Dictionaries add ‘clicktivism’ and ‘haterade’ as new words for angry times. “As well as political terms, public conversations about diet, fitness and gender were a strong influence on the words included in the latest update. ‘Superfruit’, a nutrient-rich fruit considered to be especially beneficial for health and wellbeing; HIIT, the acronym for high-intensity interval training; and ‘third gender’, a category of people who do not identify simply as male or female, all made it into the online database.”

Now available on IFTTT: Twitch. No actions at the moment, but eight triggers.

Google is bringing Google Assistant to more Android phones. “Everyone needs a helping hand sometimes. Enter the Google Assistant, which is conversational, personal and helps you get things done—from telling you about your day to taking a selfie. The Assistant is already available on Pixel, Google Home, Google Allo and Android Wear. Now we’re bringing it to even more people. Starting this week, the Google Assistant is coming to smartphones running Android 7.0 Nougat and Android 6.0 Marshmallow.”

CNET: Comcast soon will let you watch YouTube like a cable channel. “Comcast is ushering YouTube onto the boob tube. The two companies said Monday that later this year Comcast will incorporate Google’s massive video service onto X1, the cable company’s high-tech pay-TV service, used by about half of its customers. The new partnership means YouTube’s clips and streams will be available and searchable on Comcast X1 like a regular channel or show.”

USEFUL STUFF

MakeUseOf: 7 Easy Ways to Manage Your Podcast Collection. “One of the frustrating things about podcasts, however, is that not all of them are available on the same platform. For example, you may like listening to podcasts on SoundCloud, but all of the shows you like may not be available on that platform. The key to fixing this problem is collecting your favorite podcasts in one place. ”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

The Atlantic: The Monk Who Saves Manuscripts From ISIS. “Rescuing the world’s most precious antiquities from destruction is a painstaking project—and a Benedictine monk may seem like an unlikely person to lead the charge. But Father Columba Stewart is determined. Soft-spoken, dressed in flowing black robes, this 59-year-old American has spent the past 13 years roaming from the Balkans to the Middle East in an effort to save Christian and Islamic manuscripts threatened by wars, theft, weather—and, lately, the Islamic State.”

Engadget: On Facebook, love reactions triumph over hate. “Ever since Facebook introduced reactions a year ago, there’s been a lingering question: which reactions rule? At last, we know… although you can probably guess the answer. Facebook tells Select All that ‘love’ dominated the 300 billion reactions from the past year — more than half of them were hearts.” It’s all the cat pictures.

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

National Law Journal: Social Media Gets Some Respect from SCOTUS in First Amendment Case. “Mark the date: Feb. 27, 2017, may go down in history as the day that social media—from Facebook to Snapchat, Twitter to LinkedIn—entered the pantheon of expressions deserving First Amendment protection.
During a lively oral argument, U.S. Supreme Court justices discussed social media with the same respect usually reserved for colonial town criers and broadsheet newspapers that used to be the main source of news for Americans.” Good morning, Internet…

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Plants for Birds, Running Shoes, Firefox, More: Monday Afternoon Buzz, February 27, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

Not terribly new but new-to-me; the Audubon Society has launched a database of native plants for birds. “Birds and plants that are native to an area have evolved together and often have these mutually beneficial connections. Non-native plant species do not have these connections to native birds and can create ‘food deserts’ for our birds. This is a problem in the United States, where many common landscaping plants are not native to the country. In the fall of 2016 Audubon launched our Plants for Birds programme, which encourages and empowers people in the US to support birds by planting native species whenever possible.” The splash page for this resource shows a form for providing e-mail and a search box for zip code; you apparently do not need to provide your e-mail address to search. I was impressed with the number of resources I got for my search! Please note this is for the United States only.

New-to-me: an online database of running shoes. “A former competitive cross-country runner turned statistics instructor, [Jens Jakob] Andersen parlayed his love of running and shoes into a side gig by opening up his own run specialty shop. However, he soon became disillusioned by the sales process…. It was the combination of these experiences that led Andersen to develop RunRepeat, an online database of running shoes with a neutral, transparent and holistic approach. The database compiles 960 running shoes, 165,624 user reviews and 5193 expert reviews to assign each shoe a ‘Runscore’ between 0 and 100.” NO ADVERTISING!

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Ubergizmo: Firefox Testing Ability To Snooze Browser Tabs . “Come across an interesting article that you want to read but don’t have the time? There are a few different ways that you can go about handling this, one of which is bookmarking the website for later. However in the latest addition to the Firefox Test Pilot Program, Mozilla is introducing a feature called ‘SnoozeTabs’.”

Google is working on a desktop client for Allo. “While its texting software for Android has a new name, the AI-powered Allo is coming to a new platform soon. VP Nick Fox teased a desktop web client for the service in a tweet, while saying that it’s ‘still in early development.’ ”

USEFUL STUFF

TechRadar: The best free anti-ransomware tools 2017 . “Many of the big names in PC security provides tools that will release your PC from ransomware, and don’t charge for the privilege. There are also dedicated tools to prevent programs that behaves like known ransomware from running on your PC at all. This is our pick of the best free tools to unlock an infected PC, release encrypted files, or prevent a ransomware infection in the first place.” Some of the software listed is available directly from TechRadar, which I don’t like; if I’m going to download software like this I want to get it straight from the source. If you go to the software page on TechRadar, though, you’ll see a link to the developer’s site on the right.

If you have a manageable number of tweets (in other words, if you are not me) this tool for deleting old tweets could come in handy.. “For $0.99, a new iOS app called Keep or Delete by German developer Tobias Block allows you to delete your old tweets in a Tinder-like UI. It’s simple: The app loads your tweets, and you then swipe right to keep, or left to delete. It’s like dating your own bad thoughts that you somehow once decided would be a halfway decent idea to make public.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Oh, man. From NPR: An Attempt To Save South Carolina’s Historical Documents Is Destroying Them. “When you think of an old map or manuscript, you might picture something yellowed, tattered or even torn because of how long it has been around. But millions of historic documents, from presidential papers to personal slave journals, are facing an issue apart from age: a preservation method that has backfired.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

Bleeping Computer: Database Ransom Attacks Have Now Hit MySQL Servers. “After the ransacking of MongoDB, ElasticSearch, Hadoop, CouchDB, and Cassandra servers, attackers are now hijacking hundreds of MySQL databases, deleting their content, and leaving a ransom note behind asking for a 0.2 Bitcoin ($235) payment. According to breach detection firm GuardiCore, the attacks are happening via brute-force attacks on Internet-exposed MySQL servers, and there’s plenty of those laying around since MySQL is one of today’s most popular database systems.”

Jamaica Observer: Belize gov’t to clamp down on misuse of social media. “The Belize government is moving to clamp down on the misuse of social media and is establishing a taskforce to look at the issue of cyber laws, Solicitor General, Nigel Hawke has said.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

University of Rochester: Twitter researchers offer clues for why Trump won. “Jiebo Luo and Yu Wang did not set out to predict who would win the 2016 U.S. presidential election. However, their exhaustive, 14-month study of each candidate’s Twitter followers–enabled by machine learning and other data science tools–offers tantalizing clues as to why the race turned out the way it did.” Good afternoon, Internet…

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Urban Sounds, Presidential Addresses, DeviantArt, More: Monday Buzz, February 27, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

I think I remember hearing about this, I can’t find it in the firehose, so here it is, new-to-me (or at least newly remembered): a database of urban sounds. “Since the late 1990s, the London artist Stanza has been mapping sounds from cities across the globe—from New York to Berlin to Tokyo—and asking the public to contribute. ‘I realized that the whole value of putting it online is sharing it with everybody, so I made the database open sourced,’ he says. His online database, Soundcities, launched in the early 2000s; now, it includes thousands of sounds from dozens of cities.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

CNET: Twitter, PBS team up to stream Trump’s address to Congress. “Twitter will be live-streaming President Donald Trump’s upcoming address to a joint session of Congress. The social network said Thursday it’s again partnering with PBS NewsHour to broadcast the Feb. 28 speech in Washington, DC. The coverage will be anchored by Judy Woodruff and feature several correspondents and analysts commenting on Trump’s first major speech to Republicans and Democrats in the same room.”

Did not see this coming: Wix has purchased DeviantArt. I really like both sites – Wix is excellent for making cheap digital signage, and DeviantArt has some brilliant, talented people. “Get ready for some changes, deviants. Website builder Wix has bought online art gallery DeviantArt for $36 million. The 16-year-old art site and the freemium site builder closed the deal on February 22. Wix said in a statement that it intends to improve DeviantArt’s platform, especially the mobile app.”

South China Morning Post: Baidu’s Q4 sales dips as search engine struggles to regain traction. “Baidu, China’s largest online search operator, reported a second straight quarter of sales decline, as it struggles to regain traction after last year’s public backlash from the death of a medical student linked to an advertising fiasco. Sales dipped 2.6 per cent to 18.21 billion yuan (US$2.65 billion) in the fourth quarter, better than the 18.17 billion yuan consensus estimate of 16 analysts polled by Bloomberg.” Please do note that Alibaba owns the South China Morning Post, and that Alibaba does compete with Baidu in the area of online advertising.

USEFUL STUFF

If you know any under-18 victims of the 2015 Anthem insurance company hack, let them know about this offer from Anthem, which Anthem apparently released last night at 8pm on BusinessWire, because when you want to inform your customers there’s no time like 8pm on Friday night. This is a PRESS RELEASE. “Anthem is offering a special minor credit freeze program to parents and legal guardians of minors whose information was involved in the 2015 cyber attack against the company…. Working closely with the three nationwide consumer credit reporting agencies – Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion, Anthem is offering a program to allow a credit freeze for children across all three bureaus. Anthem will cover the cost of the credit freeze for this program as well as the cost of removing the credit freeze at a later date. As part of this program, Anthem will also offer to reimburse parents or legal guardians who paid for a credit freeze for their child after the announcement of Anthem’s cyber attack. In addition, for those children who became adults after January 27, 2015, Anthem will provide reimbursements for setting an adult credit freeze now.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

From Columbia Journalism Review, with a thanks to Wallace S. for the heads-up: ‘It does not feel like transparency’: Atlanta dumps 1.47 million pages of public records. “The scene [in Black Orpheus] draws an eerie portrait of the impossibility of finding information or human value in a bureaucracy bloated with paper. It came to mind recently after a singular decision by the City of Atlanta to release 1.47 million pages of documents to the press and public—on paper. Mayor Kasim Reed announced the release in a February 9 press conference, after weeks of dithering over open records requests by local media regarding a federal investigation into more than $1 million in bribes for city contracts.” Obstructive, mean-spirited, or ignorant of digital redacting techniques?

Jim Stroud: LinkedIn can relax about Facebook Jobs (at least, for now). “There has been a lot of controversy over the new jobs on Facebook initiative and how it will seriously impede LinkedIn’s recruiting business. To which I would say, umm… no it won’t. At least, not anytime soon. With all of its ease of use and audience size, Facebook still has some major hurdles to conquer before displacing LinkedIn. If you would indulge me, step into my mind as I ruminate Facebook jobs and its pending impact on the recruitment industry.” Some editorial but it’s also a good overview of how the Facebook Jobs function works.

Yahoo Beauty: Instagram Star Calls Out Company for Faking Photos. “YouTube celebrity and Instagram personality Pia Muehlenbeck says SkinnyMint Teatox doctored her personal photos to include its products and then reposted them without her permission or knowledge. ‘Honestly, I laughed when I found out — sometimes you just have to, right?’ Muehlenbeck tells Yahoo Beauty, adding that her followers alerted her to the images.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

From Techdirt, which is not into word-mincing: Google Report: 99.95 Percent Of DMCA Takedown Notices Are Bot-Generated Bullshit Buckshot. “…Google noted that more than half the takedown notices it was receiving in 2009 were mere attempts by one business targeting a competitor, while over a third of the notices contained nothing in the way of a valid copyright dispute. But if those numbers were striking in 2009, Google’s latest comment to the Copyright Office (see our own comment here) on what’s happening in the DMCA 512 notice-and-takedown world shows some stats for takedown notices received through its Trusted Copyright Removal Program… and makes the whole ordeal look completely silly.”

Internet Archive: The Internet Archive Pushes Back on “Notice and Staydown” in Recent Comments to the Copyright Office. “The US Copyright Office sought comments in its ongoing study of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) Section 512 safe harbor study. They are generally looking to find out how well the notice and takedown system is working for everyone—Internet platforms and users, as well as creators and copyright holders. We think the 1998 statute struck the right balance and is generally working well, a view shared by nearly all Internet platforms and users. However, some incumbent rightsholders and their advocacy organizations disagree and think the system needs to be completely redone because it is too hard to police copyright infringement online. These complaints fail to account for the exceeding high statutory damages rightsholders can claim and other mechanisms in copyright law that favor certain categories of rightsholders over new media creators and consumers.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

Forbes: Are Web Archives Failing The Modern Web: Video, Social Media, Dynamic Pages and The Mobile Web. “For the most part, a web archiving crawler built 20 years ago could still largely function today, downloading a web page, extracting its links, crawling each of those links, extracting their links in turn, crawling those links and so on, while recording each page’s HTML and images into its archives. Styling like CSS might be missed by those early crawlers, though well-designed ones built for arbitrary resource identification would still function today, albeit not as efficiently. The problem is that the web is no longer built upon the simple premise of a collection of small static HTML and image files served up with a simple tag structure and readily parsed with a few lines of code. Today’s web is richly dynamic, multimedia and increasingly broken into walled gardens and device-specific parallel webs.”

PLOS: Twitter sentiment around the Earnings Announcement events. “We investigate the relationship between social media, Twitter in particular, and stock market. We provide an in-depth analysis of the Twitter volume and sentiment about the 30 companies in the Dow Jones Industrial Average index, over a period of three years. We focus on Earnings Announcements and show that there is a considerable difference with respect to when the announcements are made: before the market opens or after the market closes. The two different timings of the Earnings Announcements were already investigated in the financial literature, but not yet in the social media.” Good morning, Internet…

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Elizabethtown College, Jazz Interviews, Google Spaces, More: Sunday Buzz, February 26, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

Elizabethtown College has digitized and put its student newspaper online. “Elizabethtown College’s High Library and Hess Archives recently digitized its archived school newspapers. These publications that date back to 1904 and continue through 2009, were uploaded to the Internet Archive and are accessible to the public.”

Hamilton College: Jazz Archive Adds Artist Interviews on YouTube. “On the eve of the 100th anniversary of the world’s first jazz recording*, the Hamilton College Jazz Archive has begun to add its more than 300 videotaped interviews with jazz greats onto its YouTube channel.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Well that wasn’t long: Google is shutting down Google Spaces. “Back in May last year, Google announced a new app/service called Spaces. The idea of Space is that it provided users with a platform in which they can share things with each other, although unlike other platforms, Spaces was designed for small group sharing as opposed to larger collaborations.”

Amazon Alexa, now with 10,000 skills. “A YEAR AND a half ago, Amazon opened up its Alexa voice assistant to developers. With the Alexa Skills Kit, Alexa and its hardware hosts—the Echo, Dot, Tap, and now dozens more from third parties—became more than just speakers and digital weathermen. It became a platform, capable of supporting a full ecosystem of skills, which are essentially apps that you talk to instead of touch. Today, there are 10,000 skills available on Alexa. It’s an exponential increase since last summer, a rise that presents a host of new opportunities—and new challenges.”

TechCrunch: Google.org is committing $11.5 million to racial justice. “There is generally a lack of data in the criminal justice system. At the national level, for example, there is very little data about police behavior and criminal sentencing. That’s why Google.org is re-upping its commitment to racial justice through its $11.5 million in new grant money to ten racial justice organizations. This comes after Google.org awarded $3 million to organizations working to advance racial justice last year.”

USEFUL STUFF

Make Tech Easier: How to Back Up Your WhatsApp Data to Dropbox. “Depending on how you set things up, WhatsApp can either back up your data daily, weekly, monthly, never or when you tap ‘Backup.’ When you do back up your chats, they are backed up to Google Drive, but what if you don’t trust Google Drive? Here’s a quick hack to easily back up your WhatsApp content to your Dropbox account.”

It’s about that time again… from NerdWallet: 9 Ways to Get Free Tax Help From a Human Being. “Tax help can cost a lot of money. Pros charge $150 an hour on average to do a federal and state return, according to the National Society of Accountants. Help with planning, back taxes or audits can cost even more. But there are a few ways to get human tax help for free.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

PR Newswire: “Ride Archive” Offers VR Simulations of Lost Theme Park Rides and Attractions (PRESS RELEASE). “‘Anyone who’s been to a theme park has a favorite ride. But what about all the rides that went away before their time and still linger in the childhood memories of grown-ups today?’ So begins a viral video pitch at RideArchive.com that’s received nearly 620,000 views on Facebook. According to concept designer Jay Kristopher Huddy, the Ride Archive represents ‘the future of preserving the past’ by providing VR simulations of decommissioned rides and attractions from your favorite theme parks.” There are some intellectual property issues to be addressed, so I’m not sure this will ever come to fruition – but what a great idea!

A livestream of a pregnant giraffe was pulled from YouTube — for nudity. GIRAFFE NUDITY. “[Jordan] Patch claims that the livestream of its pregnant giraffe April, received 20 to 30 million views in just twelve hours. But with this masses came problems. While the zoo sees the video as education, Patch says that some ‘extremists and animal right activists’ reported the livestream as containing sexually explicit or nude content, which triggered YouTube to pull the video.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

ZDNet: Cybercriminals start cashing in on vulnerable WordPress websites. “It is estimated that up to 1.5 million websites may remain unpatched. However, the situation appears to have worsened. According to researchers from SiteLock, the latest trend in vulnerable WordPress website defacement is the launch of rogue pharmacies. These websites, rather common already online, promise to provide “authentic” erectile dysfunction medication.”

PC Magazine: Google’s Collision Shakes Up Computer Cryptography. “after years of trying, Google found a way to crack the SHA-1 cryptographic hash function, a security building block that enables digital signatures and HTTPS encryption. Cracking SHA-1 requires creating a cryptographic hash collision, which is essentially when a single hash, or ‘digest’ applies to two different files.”

Recode: Alphabet’s Waymo is suing Otto and Uber for allegedly stealing the design of a key self-driving system. “Waymo, formerly Google’s self-driving car unit, is suing Otto — the self-driving trucking company co-founded by former Waymo employee Anthony Levandowski and quickly acquired by Uber — for allegedly stealing the company’s proprietary design for its laser-based radar system.” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!