afternoonbuzz

Sex & Sexuality, Hash Code, Flooding Risks, More: Tuesday Evening ResearchBuzz, January 14, 2020

NEW RESOURCES

Adam Matthew: Adam Matthew Digital and The Kinsey Institute announce publication of Sex & Sexuality digital archive. “The Kinsey Institute’s Archives and Special Collections is one of the largest and most important collections in the world for the study of human sexuality. This resource provides unprecedented digital access to the Kinsey’s most important research collections, covering the work of prominent sex researchers such as Dr Harry Benjamin and Dr John Money, as well as the work of the Institute itself during the tenures of its first three Directors: Dr Alfred Kinsey, Dr Paul H. Gebhard and Dr June Reinisch.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Google Blog: Google’s Hash Code competition is back. “Hash Code was created back in 2014 by a few engineers in the Google France office. These engineers were coding competition enthusiasts and wondered if it would be possible to create a new kind of coding competition, one that looked more like the type of work they did each day.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: New online database to give homebuyers detailed information about flood risks. “First Street Foundation on Tuesday launched Flood Lab, a research partnership which provides eight universities with its model that maps previous instances of flooding as well as future risks. Using the dataset, Wharton, MIT and John Hopkins University among others will quantify the impacts of flooding on the U.S. economy….The data will be made available to the public in the first half of 2020 in an online database searchable by home address.”

The New York Times: While Shuttered at Home, China Exploits Social Media Abroad. “China says its diplomats and government officials will fully exploit foreign social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter that are blocked off to its own citizens.”

Poynter: ‘What’s Crap on WhatsApp?’ has debunked 25 hoaxes in 6 episodes. What is the challenge now?. “Since June 2019, when the International Fact-Checking Network awarded a $50,000 grant to Africa Check to develop ‘What’s Crap on WhatsApp?,’ a voice note show specially designed to be shared on the private message app, about 1,600 people have subscribed to the ‘appcast,’ which totals six episodes. In total, they have heard 25 falsehoods being debunked, 10 of them related to health issues.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

Krebs on Security: Cryptic Rumblings Ahead of First 2020 Patch Tuesday. “Sources tell KrebsOnSecurity that Microsoft Corp. is slated to release a software update on Tuesday to fix an extraordinarily serious security vulnerability in a core cryptographic component present in all versions of Windows. Those sources say Microsoft has quietly shipped a patch for the bug to branches of the U.S. military and to other high-value customers/targets that manage key Internet infrastructure, and that those organizations have been asked to sign agreements preventing them from disclosing details of the flaw prior to Jan. 14, the first Patch Tuesday of 2020.”

Boing Boing: New claim of YouTube copyright strike extortion. “Jukin Media, one of several media companies that acquires rights to viral video clips, has managed unlicensed use of such clips by monetizing them through YouTube’s contentID system. But Jukin has now reportedly threatened to use copyright strikes to shut down a channel while privately demanding money from its operator. It’s extortion, says the target, hit with a $6000 ‘bill’ over brief snippets of media.”

BusinessWire: Kramer Levin Launches Biologics Law Blog (PRESS RELEASE). “Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP today launched the Bio Law Blog, which provides insights into intellectual property law and regulatory developments for biologic medicines. The blog is edited by Kramer Levin partners Irena Royzman, Ph.D., Jonathan S. Caplan and Hannah Lee.” I wasn’t sure what “biologic medicine” was, but MedicineNet helped me out.

RESEARCH & OPINION

Salon: How Facebook misunderstands free speech. “There is a widespread perception by users and outside observers that Facebook is a platform that is misused by assorted actors — both state and corporate — to manipulate the public. The company is positioning the Ad Library as an attempt to ward off that kind of criticism, by making it transparent who is paying for what kinds of ads. Yet transparency wasn’t Facebook’s problem in the first place — or at least, not entirely. The social and political problems engendered by Facebook are rooted in how the platform and its leaders misunderstand what free speech is, and how it works. Facebook brass seem to think transparency — in knowing who manipulates us — is preferable to actually, say, ceasing the manipulation entirely.”

BBC: What went wrong with virtual reality?. “As a keen gamer, Anna should be part of the core audience for at-home VR entertainment. But her lack of interest is pretty common, and it means that virtual reality headsets have yet to take off.” Good evening, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Categories: afternoonbuzz

Whaddaya think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.