afternoonbuzz

January 6 Videos, Rhode Island Newspapers, Google Forms, More: Monday Afternoon ResearchBuzz, January 18, 2021

NEW RESOURCES

ProPublica: Inside the Capitol Riot: What the Parler Videos Reveal. “Parler’s failure to ‘effectively identify and remove content that encourages or incites violence against others’ led Amazon to expel the site from its cloud-hosting servers. Some people managed to grab the material before Parler went down, and one of them shared a trove of videos with ProPublica. We culled the collection to some 500 videos uploaded to Parler by people in the vicinity of the White House and Capitol on Jan. 6, and sorted them by time and location, thus giving the public an immersive experience that would previously have been impossible to achieve without being there amid the clouds of tear gas and pepper spray and the crush of bodies pressing toward their goal.”

US News & World Report: Historic Rhode Island Newspapers Digitized, Available Online. “The archives of several historic Rhode Island newspapers have been digitized and are now freely available for researchers, the Providence Public Library and the Rhode Island Historical Society said.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

CNET: Parler vows to return after Amazon pulls hosting amid concerns over violent posts. “Parler CEO John Matze posted a message to the company’s website over the weekend, promising the Twitter alternative would return after it went dark when Amazon cut off hosting services.”

NPR: Social Media Site Gab Is Surging, Even As Critics Blame It For Capitol Violence. “The plans to storm the Capitol were unfolding online in plain sight on niche social media sites and Facebook and Twitter long before the attack happened on Jan 6. Critics say social media companies, to varying degrees, permitted talk of the violence to persist without cracking down enough. As federal investigators launch criminal cases against some of the perpetrators of the violence, a growing chorus advocates and lawmakers say tech companies bear some responsibility, too.”

USEFUL STUFF

Digital Inspiration: How to Send a File to Participants After they Submit your Google Form. “Google Forms for Giveways! How to send a file attachement like PDF ebook or MP3 music to form respondents after they complete the quiz or survey and submit your Google Form.”

ZDNet: How to switch from Windows 7 to Chrome OS CloudReady. “The main reason to use this as a Windows alternative is its ease of use. It’s also free for individual users who don’t require Google Admin tools. The only difference between the home version and the two business ones is is it doesn’t come with technical support or access to Google Admin Console. Besides giving your Windows 7 PC a new lease on life, you’ll find it will make it peppier. CloudReady is much lighter on system resources than any version of Windows.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

USA Today: Extremists exploit a loophole in social moderation: Podcasts on Apple, Google. “Major social platforms have been cracking down on the spread of misinformation and conspiracy theories in the leadup to the presidential election, and expanded their efforts in the wake of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. But Apple and Google, among others, have left open a major loophole for this material: podcasts.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

Al Jazeera: Pakistan court sentences three to death for blasphemy. “An anti-terrorism court in Pakistan has handed death sentences to three people for social media posts deemed insulting to Prophet Muhammad under the country’s blasphemy laws.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

TechCrunch: Zocdoc founder returns with Shadow, an app that finds lost dogs. “Every year, around 10 million pets go missing in the U.S., and millions of those end up in shelters where they aren’t always reunited with their owners, due to their lack of identification or a microchip. A new mobile app, Shadow, aims to tackle this problem by leveraging a combination of a volunteer network and A.I. technology to help dog owners, in particular.”

EurekAlert: Can we be manipulated into sharing private info online? Yes, says Ben-Gurion U. study. “Online users are more likely to reveal private information based on how website forms are structured to elicit data, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have determined.” Good afternoon, Internet…

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