Opera Browser, Google Search, Bookplates, More: Friday Buzz, January 13, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

Opera has released an experimental browser. “As much as modern desktop web browsers can do, their basic concept is stuck in a rut. It’s not really designed for the way many people use the web, such as chatting while you surf. Opera wants to climb out of that hole, and it’s trying an unusual approach to make that happen: it’s launching Opera Neon, a separate “concept” browser that shows where software could go. It’s much more visual, with an uncluttered look, tabs and shortcuts as bubbles and a side control bar that largely gets out of your way. However, the real fun starts when you want to juggle multiple sites — this is more of an intelligent desktop than your usual web client.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Google is saying its link: special search syntax is dead. “Yesterday, we covered that Google’s John Mueller said not to use the link operator. This comes a year or so after Google said the link operator is not dead yet. Well, now it is dead.” I just tried it and it works fine, so… ?

Hyperallergic has a writeup on a wonderful set of bookplates which were recently added to Flickr Commons. “Recently, the University of British Columbia (UBC) Library added bookplates from its Rare Books and Special Collections to their ongoing Flickr Commons album. These examples are part of the Thomas Murray Collection. … Along with those on Flickr, you can explore 1,095 digitized bookplates on the UBC Library website, with the option to sort by year and visual subject, such as heraldry, ships, and portraits.”

The Knight Foundation — AI In the Public Interest: How a New Fund Will Advance the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence. “For Knight Foundation, and our deeply rooted belief that informed and engaged communities are essential to democracy, exploring artificial intelligence is a natural. Identifying the ethical issues in AI, helping determine who decides them, and engaging diverse perspectives is the way we’ll make the most of AI’s potential to benefit society – and minimize its potential harm. A group of foundations, investors and academic institutions are joining in this unique collaboration, called the Ethics and Governance of Artificial Intelligence Fund.”

Mashable will be livestreaming the Trump inauguration. “The live broadcast will include the swearing in of Trump as 45th President of the United States and Mike Pence as vice president in addition the Inaugural Address and Parade. Coverage will run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET on Jan. 20. Managing editor Judy Woodruff will anchor the broadcast along with NewsHour correspondents John Yang reporting from the U.S. Capitol and Lisa Desjardins from the National Mall.”

Looks like Google might be easing out of drones. “Google’s high-flying drone dreams may be dashed for now. Its parent company, Alphabet, has reportedly cut the Titan program, which Google first acquired in 2014.”

USEFUL STUFF

MakeUseOf: Make YouTube Even Better With These 15 Amazing Tools. “Do you want to add lyrics to music videos? Get YouTube to play in a pop-out window? Print a video storyboard? Mix together some of your favorite songs? There are third-party tools that’ll allow you to do all that and more. Are you ready to supercharge your YouTube experience? Here are 15 of the best third-party apps, websites, add-ons, and extensions you should be using.”

From Info We Trust: A History of DataViz. “After examining the history of data visualization greats I decided to collect my learnings in the style of history’s data visualization greats. The first of these visual summaries is presented and discussed below.” This is really nice.

A useful trick from the Getty Research Institute Library: A Smartphone Trick for Viewing Negatives. “We allow researchers to use their smartphone cameras to take study images of material during their visits in our Special Collections Reading Room. Many of our library visitors benefit from this opportunity to snap photos to aid them in their research. The trusty smartphone has a handy trick in its settings features that can also help researchers to view negative film in positive colors. We tried it out and were quite pleased with the results.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Forbes: Do Social Media Platforms Really Care About Online Abuse? “Each time the platforms miss something, the typical response from the companies tends to be along the line of limited resources – that the platforms process so much content that they simply lack the human review resources to go through all that content. Yet, when it comes to other fields like food safety, we don’t argue that salmonella outbreaks are perfectly acceptable because it would cost too much for companies to invest in the equipment, training and processes to avoid it. We understand that there is always a risk of an outbreak, but we expect that food processing companies will pay the costs to avoid it to the best that technology and human capability permits today.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

Meet the New Year, same as the Old Year – Adobe is patching security flaws. “Adobe today released its first patches of the year, a familiar refrain of Flash Player and Reader fixes, none of which are under attack. The Flash update addresses 13 vulnerabilities, all but one of which trigger remote code execution attacks. Meanwhile, 29 bugs were patched in Reader and Acrobat, and all but one enable code execution.”

Eeek! From TheNextWeb: Dutch journalists hack local politicians’ Twitter accounts to expose weak security . “If gaining access to an account is as easy as searching for an account in leaked databases (and sometimes breaking a weak hash), it’s not only easy for Twitter vandals to log in, but also for more malicious state actors – spy agencies and the likes. That’s why a couple of Dutch journalists from local news channel RTL Nieuws decided to take matters in their own hands and demonstrate how easy it can be to access accounts of high level politicians. Journalists Daniël Verlaan and Siebe Sietsma found account data of two local politicians in leaked databases, broke the encryption on the passwords and proceeded to tweet from the politicians’ Twitter accounts.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

Reuters: Third of global consumers open to Google, Amazon banking -survey. “Roughly one in three banking and insurance customers globally would consider switching their accounts to Google (GOOGL.O), Amazon (AMZN.O) or Facebook (FB.O) if the Silicon Valley giants offered financial services, according to a new survey on Wednesday.” Good morning, Internet…

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Virginia Legislators, UNC Handbooks, South Carolina Schools, More: Thursday Afternoon Buzz, January 12, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

Citizens of Virginia have a new option to follow their state government – video of Virginia House sessions. “Starting today, each day’s House floor proceedings will be available on the General Assembly website within a few hours of session adjourning for the day. The House also has created a search feature that will allow viewers to search by bill or by member. Archived video can be found on the House video streaming page, accessible from the Homepage as well as from the Quick Links tab in the Members and Session section of the website.”

Digital NC has added a collection of student handbooks from the University of North Carolina. “These handbooks span the years 1926-1952 and provide insight into what life was like as an incoming student during that time. The handbooks include academic calendars, campus maps, a welcome from the university president, and helpful information about what to expect as an incoming freshman.”

The state of South Carolina has launched a new Web site to show school closings and delays across the entire state. “The next time South Carolina schools cancel class due to nasty weather, parents will have one more place to check for updates. The S.C. Department of Education has launched a School Closure Web Application … that will display school closures and delays from every school district in the state.”

Just in case y’all hadn’t seen it, the Internet Archive has a collection of PDF documents from the US General Services Administration relating to the upcoming transition of Presidential administrations. These documents are blocked from indexing by ROBOTS.TXT so the collection had to be assembled manually.

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Europeana Sounds, a collection of soundscapes from around Europe, has added Istanbul. “This is a collection of over two hundred sounds recorded around Istanbul and the overall result really does create a vivid soundscape of the city. You can hear a donor kebab seller sharpening his knife; a fishmonger chatting to his customers; the tapping sounds from a wood carver’s stall; or, the more modern sounds of the Istanbul Metro ticket barriers.”

The Onion Browser for iOS is now free. “When Mike Tigas first created the Onion Browser app for iOS in 2012, he never expected it to become popular. He was working as a newsroom Web developer at The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington, at the time, and wanted a Tor browser app for himself and his colleagues. Expecting little interest, he then put Onion Browser on the Apple App Store at just $0.99/£0.69, the lowest non-zero price that Apple allows.”

Google Classroom has gotten some updates. “Google Classroom is designed for everyone involved in a student’s education. More than 20 million educators and students use it to teach and learn together, as do administrators who oversee how this tool is used across classrooms, and developers who are building educational technology for the next generation. As everyone heads back to school to start the new semester, we’re releasing new Classroom updates designed specifically for each of these groups.”

USEFUL STUFF

From Olivier Travers, and it’s good to hear from him: Troubleshoot & Audit Google Analytics Guide. “Whether for my own sites or while consulting for other businesses, I’ve often run into a nagging feeling that the ubiquitous Google Analytics (GA) is not entirely properly installed, and that it might not be tracking the whole site. Here’s a checklist to know for sure while remaining sane.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

PRI: The Filipino president has deployed a ‘social media army’ to push his agenda. “President Rodrigo Duterte, who came into power last year, has already proven himself to be a ‘power user’ on Twitter: He has allegedly deployed a sort of ‘social media army’ to not only push out pro-Duterte propaganda but to keep his critics in check. Journalist Sean Williams says he’s been on the receiving end of Duterte’s keyboard army, something that he details in an article titled, ‘Rodrigo Duterte’s Army of Online Trolls,’ which has been published in this month’s issue of The New Republic.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

Reuters: Third of global consumers open to Google, Amazon banking -survey. “Roughly one in three banking and insurance customers globally would consider switching their accounts to Google (GOOGL.O), Amazon (AMZN.O) or Facebook (FB.O) if the Silicon Valley giants offered financial services, according to a new survey on Wednesday.” Good afternoon, Internet…

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Historical Brunswick (ME), Chattanooga Flyers, BPA, More: Thursday Buzz, January 12, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

A historian in Maine has created his own historical index for Brunswick. “The past can be elusive, its contents fleeting. Often it takes a concerted effort to dig through some archives. Enter retired history teacher and historian Richard F. Snow. Snow — who grew up in Brunswick and resides in Topsham — has put together an extensive index of articles, pictures and obituaries from the Brunswick Telegraph and the Brunswick Record — forerunners to today’s The Times Record — and donated his work to the Curtis Memorial Library. The Snow Index will give locals and folks from away a chance to delve into their family’s pasts by accessing the library’s website, a substantial shortcut over previous practices like coming into the library or browsing newspaper websites.”

I love ephemera archives! A new Tumblr site is creating an archive of band/performance flyers from Chattanooga, Tennessee. I also love that there’s a local news site for the area called Nooga.com. “The site, A History of Chattanooga Flyers, accepts submissions from all types of shows, including music concerts, film showings, roller derby games and basically any other show/performance that’s taken place in Chattanooga over the past few decades.”

The government of California has launched an online database of products containing BPA. “The database contains nearly 20,000 entries. It includes such details as a product’s brand and description, size, universal product code (UPC) and category. It also includes a date column allowing manufacturers transitioning to BPA alternatives to indicate the ‘use by’ date beyond which products have been manufactured without BPA.” Link to the database at the bottom of the page, not in the story. If you have lame Internet like I do, you might have to wait a moment for the database to load.

In development: a database for public notices in Virginia. “The Virginia Press Association is creating a website where people can search for public notices published by newspapers across the state…. It will include legal notices routinely published in newspapers and issued by government agencies and private entities such as law firms, contractors and utilities. Those include public meeting notices, foreclosure notices, requests for bids on contracts and proposed zoning changes.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Is Google going to sell its satellite business? “Alphabet Inc. is in talks to sell the Skybox Imaging satellite business it acquired for $500 million less than three years ago, another sign the technology giant is ratcheting back grand ambitions to blanket the globe with internet service.”

USEFUL STUFF

MakeUseOf: Capture Streaming Video From Any Website With These 5 Tools. “A majority of today’s internet traffic consists of streamed video. YouTube alone accounts for a big chunk of that. Over 400 hours of content uploaded every minute, an average of 40 minutes watched per session, and greater reach in the 18–49 demographic than cable TV. And then you have to consider other video streaming sites like Vimeo, Dailymotion, Metacafe, Vine, Twitch, etc. That’s a lot of data flowing around.”

TechRadar: How to connect your Google Calendar to Amazon Echo. “Out of the box the Amazon Echo (and the smaller, cheaper Amazon Echo Dot ) is a fantastically useful device, with its voice-activated virtual assistant Alexa giving you all sorts of information (such as weather and traffic updates) to help you plan your day, but by allowing the Amazon Echo to access your Google Calendar, you can make it even more useful.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Apparently pranking Google Maps is just a regular thing now. From The Guardian: ‘Chamber of Rats’: Mexican parliament renamed in Google Maps prank. “Pranksters changed the name of Mexico’s lower house of Congress to the ‘Chamber of Rats’ on Google Maps on Tuesday in the latest dig at the political class during a testing start to the year for the country’s government.”

Italy is reportedly reviewing a proposal from Google to settle tax issues. “Italy’s tax authorities are looking at a proposal from Alphabet Inc’s Google to pay between 270 million and 280 million euros ($286-296 million) to settle a tax dispute, a source close to the matter said on Tuesday. A year ago Italian tax police alleged that Google had evaded paying taxes worth 227 million euros between 2009 and 2013 in a move which was said could result in heavy punitive fines.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

The Guardian: WhatsApp, Facebook and Google face tough new privacy rules under EC proposal. “The new legislation seeks to reinforce the right to privacy and control of data for European citizens, with messaging, email and voice services – such as those provided by Facebook, Google and Microsoft – forced to guarantee the confidentiality of conversations and metadata around the time, place and other factors of those conversations.”

OTHER STUFF I THINK IS COOL

I don’t often link to The Sun, but this was very amusing: ‘MYSTERY SEARCH’ There’s a secret version of Google search which can yield some very surprising results. “Although the little known site uses the same Google search bar as you’re used to, mystery searches come with a twist which means you rarely get the results you were expecting. That’s because the engine doesn’t show the results for what you just typed in, instead it shows the results for the previous person’s search – meaning you have no idea what you’re going to get.” Good morning, Internet…

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Boston Catholics, Microsoft, Federal Research, More: Wednesday Afternoon Buzz, January 11, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

The Boston Globe has news on a new collection of records on Boston Catholics. “For genealogy and history buffs, a new collaboration between the New England Historic Genealogical Society and the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston is bringing more than a century’s worth of church records within reach of the nearest Internet connection. The organizations Tuesday unveiled the beginnings of an online archive of sacramental records for Boston’s earliest Catholics.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Engadget: Microsoft privacy dashboard gives you control over your data . “Microsoft has been accused of overstepping privacy boundaries with Windows 10, but it’s ready to try and regain some of that broken trust. It’s launching a web-based account privacy dashboard that lets you monitor and control the information Microsoft services use. You can view and wipe your Bing search history, Edge browsing history and your location activity. And if you’re worried about what Cortana Notebook and Microsoft Health are doing, you can edit your data for those services.”

From Whitehouse.gov: Making Federal Research Results Available to All. “In recent weeks, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) completed their public access plans and posted them on their open government web pages. As a result, 22 Federal departments and agencies accounting for more than 99 percent of U.S. Federal R&D expenditures now have public access plans in place. A consolidated listing can be found here.” How long the public access plans stay in place remains to be seen.

Monmouth University has acquired Bruce Springsteen’s archives. “The rocker’s personal collection of written works, photographs, magazines and other artifacts from throughout his career will make up the new Bruce Springsteen Archives and Center for American Music. Monmouth is fittingly located near the Jersey Shore, not far from Springsteen’s hometown of Freehold and even closer to Asbury Park, the beach town where his career began.”

With the news that Facebook is planning advertising for its video, it shouldn’t be surprising to hear that Instagram is on board too. “Instagram … is planning similar ads for its Stories feature — the sharing function it copied from Snapchat in August. ‘Instagram is testing them now with select publishers and content creators,’ an unidentified ad agency exec told Adage about the new ad format.”

USEFUL STUFF

From The Daring Librarian: 4 Fun FREE Apps to Win The Instagram Game. “There are a lot of cool FREE Apps out there that can add functionality and sparkle to the number one picture and video App Instagram, but I’m going to share my favorite four! And yeah, I’m still mourning the loss of Vine. But, finding these new Apps has helped me get past the it… a little! ”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Huh. YouTube is hosting a competition to make a video for an Elton John song. “Like many legendary musicians, Elton John didn’t get music videos for some of his best-known songs — they simply came too soon for the likes of MTV. Thanks to the internet, however, he’s getting a second chance. YouTube is backing a competition, Elton John: The Cut, that challenges you to brainstorm an official music video treatment for ‘Bennie and the Jets,’ ‘Rocket Man,’ or ‘Tiny Dancer.'”

The Atlantic: All of Human Knowledge Buried in a Salt Mine. “Martin Kunze wants to gather a snapshot of all of human knowledge onto plates and bury it away in the world’s oldest salt mine. In Hallstatt, Austria, a picturesque village nestled into a lake-peppered region called Salzkammergut, Kunze has spent the past four years engraving images and text onto hand-sized clay squares. A ceramicist by trade, he believes the durability of the materials he plies gives them an as-yet unmatched ability to store information. Ceramic is impervious to water, chemicals, and radiation; it’s emboldened by fire. Tablets of Sumerian cuneiform are still around today that date from earlier than 3000 B.C.E.”

From The Verge: How a group of Redditors is creating a fake stock market to figure out the value of memes. “Like jokes, dreams, and teen culture, it’s uncool to explain a meme. Explanations take effort, and effort is antithetical to an art form that begs to be perceived as effortless. r/MemeEconomy is a quirky solution, a subreddit in which people discuss memes as if they’re real-world commodities. If a meme is just beginning to bubble up online, you say you’re going to BUY. If a meme has peaked, you SELL, SELL, SELL. No real money is involved. The game is just an artifice with which to vocalize your commentary as a knowledgeable insider. It’s intentionally tongue in cheek, talking ‘investments’ without seeming too invested.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

Do you use autofill? Please read this. “The phising attack is brutally simple. [Viljami] Kuosmanen discovered that when a user attempts to fill in information in some simple text boxes, such as name and email address, the autofill system, which is intended to avoid tedious repetition of standard information such as your address, will input other profile-based information into any other text boxes – even when those boxes are not visible on the page.” Good afternoon, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

African-American Migration, Google Voice, Wikimedia, More: Wednesday Buzz, January 11, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

A new Web site has oral histories of African-Americans who migrated from the southern US to the northern US in the early 20th century. “The oral histories were part of what was intended to be a larger project for the museum about the transformative effects of the influx of black Southerners on the city [of Philadelphia] in the early 20th century. From 1910 to 1930, their population rose from roughly 85,000 to almost 220,000. The interviews were aired on public radio in the 1980s, but Charles Hardy III, a historian and West Chester University professor, and his fellow researchers ran out of money to bring their vision to fruition.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Good heavens! Are there Google Voice updates on the horizon??! “It’s been a long, long, long time since Google Voice gained any new features or even received much attention from Google. But it appears that’s about to change. Maybe. Hopefully. Today there’s a banner at the top of the Google Voice website that says ‘The New Google Voice is here.’ There’s a clickable link to ‘try now,’ … Some people are seeing it, and others are not.”

Wikimedia is getting money to get organized. “Today, the rich images and media in Wikimedia Commons are described only by casual notation, making it difficult to fully explore and use this remarkable resource. The generous contribution from the Sloan Foundation will enable the Wikimedia Foundation to connect Wikimedia Commons with Wikidata, the central storage for structured data within the Wikimedia projects. Wikidata will empower Wikimedia volunteers to transform Wikimedia Commons into a rich, easily-searchable, and machine-readable resource for the world. Over three years, the Wikimedia Foundation will develop infrastructure, tools, and community support to enable the work of contributors, who have long requested a way to add more precise, multilingual and reusable data to media files.”

Los Angeles Times: Snapchat in 2017: 7 predictions about what’s to come. “As Snap Inc. moves toward an expected initial public offering this year, it’s natural to expect increased predictability and transparency from a company that has thrived so far without much of either. In question in 2017 is whether Chief Executive Evan Spiegel will make Snap act more like Facebook or if he will continue forging a new route. Our guess: He’ll walk the line between the two.” When he writes an article, Paresh Dave doesn’t mess around…

Marissa Mayer is resigning from the Yahoo board of directors. “The company announced on Monday that Mayer would be stepping down from the board as Yahoo completes the sale of its core business to Verizon.”

Facebook is apparently going to add advertisements to its videos. “Industry sources say the social network is going to start testing a new ‘mid-roll’ ad format, which will give video publishers the chance to insert ads into their clips after people have watched them for at least 20 seconds. For now, Facebook will sell the ads and share the revenue with publishers, giving them 55 percent of all sales. That’s the same split offered by YouTube, which dominates the online video ad business.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Techdirt: Turkey Is Building Domestic Replacements For Gmail and Google. “Turkey has a long history of blocking Internet services. It’s become such a thing, there’s even a site called TurkeyBlocks that is exclusively about this phenomenon. A couple of recent stories on the site suggest the Turkish government is aiming to tighten its local control over the online world even more.” There’s going to be a lot more of this.

Backchannel: Where Weird Facebook is King: How a College Kid Does Social. “On January 2, 2015, I wrote a viral post entitled ‘A Teenager’s View on Social Media,’ in which I dissected popular apps and what I thought about them. It got over one million views. Many people have asked me to write a follow-up or, at the very least, an update. I haven’t felt there was a dramatic enough shift to warrant a new post…until now.” I have actually gotten pretty good at Snapchat, but I’m not using it because I can’t find any friends who Snapchat. Mostly I get porn spam. I’m ResearchBuzz if you want to add me. No more porn spam, please.

Bloomberg: Facebook’s hiring process hinders its effort to create a diverse workforce. “Facebook has put itself at the forefront of efforts to recruit a more diverse workforce, including a targeted internal recruiting strategy in 2015 designed to bring in female, black and Latino software engineers. Yet within Facebook’s engineering department, the push has been hampered by a multi-layered hiring process that gives a small committee of high-ranking engineers veto power over promising candidates, frustrating recruiters and hindering progress on diversity goals.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

Washington Post: It’s time to retire the tainted term ‘fake news’. “Fake news has a real meaning — deliberately constructed lies, in the form of news articles, meant to mislead the public. For example: The one falsely claiming that Pope Francis had endorsed Donald Trump, or the one alleging without basis that Hillary Clinton would be indicted just before the election. But though the term hasn’t been around long, its meaning already is lost.”

Don Heider at USA Today: Why Facebook should hire a chief ethicist. “Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and all tech companies should hire a chief ethicist. Chief ethicists could help executives think through difficult, critical decisions. They could help develop ethical guidelines for companies, even a code of ethics. And they could provide company-wide training on ethical decision-making.”

OTHER STUFF I THINK IS COOL

From Medium: Cognitive bias cheat sheet, simplified. “Four months ago I attempted to synthesize Wikipedia’s crazy list of cognitive biases, and after banging my head against the wall for weeks, came up with this Cognitive Bias Cheat Sheet which John Manoogian III beautifully organized into the above poster. It’s a 12-minute read, and I didn’t actually expect anyone to read it, but four months later it’s been viewed 700,000 times and recommended almost 5,000 times! Since then, I’ve started working on a book proposal (get on the email list!) around these topics, and wanted to start by creating an actual cheat sheet that doesn’t take so long to read. Here it is…” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!