Walters Art Museum, US Elections, Corporate Crime, More: Tuesday Buzz, September 27, 2016

NEW RESOURCES

The Walters Art Museum has launched a new Web site for its manuscripts. “Featuring a user-friendly design, the site provides visitors with intuitive search options, including the ability to refine their search by date, geography, subject, culture, and more. It also gives users a chance to coordinate their own online collections by gathering, saving and sharing their favorite masterpieces. Over the past decade, cataloguers, conservators, curators and digitization specialists have been poring over the museum’s collection of more than 900 manuscripts dating from the 8th to the 20th century.”

Talkwalker has launched a new dashboard to monitor the Clinton v. Trump social media conversation (PRESS RELEASE). I suspect there will be many of these and I’ll try not to get tiresome with them. “The dashboard looks at which candidates are getting the most positive and negative attention online, the key election issues linked to each candidate, how the candidates perform in swing states and more. Want to know what the breakdown is between the candidates in terms of overall share of online buzz, share of topics, hashtags being used, overall positive and negative posts about each candidate or emerging people and topic themes, this real-time social media dashboard does all that and more.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

A corporate crime and misconduct database has been expanded (PRESS RELEASE). ” Since the beginning of 2010, drug manufacturers, hospital systems, insurers and other healthcare companies have paid nearly $7 billion in fines and settlements to resolve cases in which they were accused of defrauding the federal government. Banks, led by Wells Fargo, account for the second largest portion of False Claims Act penalties, with more than $3 billion in payments…. With the addition of more than 750 cases relating to the 150-year-old False Claims Act and similar laws, Violation Tracker now contains a total of 112,000 entries from 30 federal regulatory agencies and all divisions of the Justice Department.”

USEFUL STUFF

Quick roundup from Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 8 Useful Educational Web Tools for Research Students (thanks to Jennifer W for the heads-up.) “There are a wide variety of web tools and mobile applications that facilitate researchers work and help them communicate and collaborate with the research community and easily share and disseminate research findings. Besides the numerous resources we reviewed here over the last few years, today we are sharing with you this interesting collection of web tools that student researchers can use to manage their references, compile bibliographies, generate citations, access journal articles and many more.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

TechCrunch: Is Facebook having a crisis of confidence over all the bad news its algorithms are making? “I ask because Facebook is surveying users to ask whether they think it cares about them. Yes, it is literally using the word ‘cares’. The survey, which Facebook says is being pushed to ‘a small group of people’, includes questions probing for users’ strength of feeling about Facebook (positive or negative), before asking them to elaborate on why they feel that way.” Good roundup article.

Rumors are flying about an Android/Chrome hybrid. “We’ve learned from multiple sources that Google plans to launch its forthcoming Andromeda Android/Chrome OS hybrid OS on two devices: a Huawei Nexus tablet and a ‘convertible laptop’. The latter device was just reported on by Android Police, and we can independently confirm that this device is planned. Our sources say, however, that a Huawei Nexus — yes, a Nexus — is also planned…”

Google is celebrating its birthday even though it apparently can’t settle on a date. (Fun fact: ResearchBuzz is older than Google.)

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

Senator Mark Warner is calling for an SEC investigation into the Yahoo hack. “Although the SEC has longstanding guidance on when publicly traded companies should report hacking incidents, companies that have experienced known breaches often omit those details in regulatory filings, according to a 2012 Reuters investigation…. In a Sept. 9 regulatory filing with the SEC, Yahoo stated it did not have knowledge of ‘any incidents of, or third party claims alleging … unauthorized access’ of personal data of its customers that could have a material adverse effect on Verizon’s acquisition.”

Twitter has refused to block the account of a Turkish journalist. “A Turkish court ordered Twitter to block the account of a noted journalist last week, accusing him of “instigating terrorism.” But despite receiving the court order, Twitter has decided not to comply, Motherboard has learned. The company got a court order requesting the censorship of 17 accounts, including that of Mahir Zeynalov, a well known DC-based writer. But as of Monday morning, the account was still up all over the world, including within Turkey.” As of this writing — 9/26 at 1954 — it’s still up.

Meanwhile, Facebook is being accused of censoring Palestinian journalists. “Facebook has apologized for disabling the personal accounts of several editors and executives at two major Palestinian news publications, according to a report from The Electronic Intifada. Facebook says the accounts were mistakenly suspended after being reported for violating the site’s community standards, but the publications believe the incident is related to Israel’s recent push to combat online incitement to violence.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

From MIT Technology Review: The Internet Is No Place for Public Elections. “Despite what your local election officials may tell you, you can’t trust the Internet with your vote. This election year we’ve seen foreign hackers infiltrate the Democratic National Committee’s e-mail system as well as voter databases in Arizona and Illinois. These attacks have reinforced what political scientists and technical experts alike have been saying for more than a decade: public elections should stay offline. It’s not yet feasible to build a secure and truly democratic Internet-connected voting system.”

Recode: Why Disney Won’t Buy Twitter. “Forget, for a moment, whether Disney could fix Twitter’s fundamental product problems, which have capped the company’s growth. Or whether Disney is ready to associate its pristine brand with a platform that’s become a playground for the worst people on the internet. Or whether [Bob] Iger, who made three of the best acquisitions in history, period — Marvel + Lucasfilm + Pixar, for a mere $15 billion (!) — wants to gamble his legacy on this.” Also, Disney tried the online space once. It ended very badly. There is no indication that Disney has the infrastructure to support developing something like Twitter. Good morning, Internet…

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Asteroids, Japan Politics, Minnesota Folk Songs, More: Monday Buzz, September 26, 2016

NEW RESOURCES

The Smithsonian has launched a new newsletter about asteroids. “Almost every day, a known asteroid passes within a few million miles of Earth. On those dates, the Daily Minor Planet will list the flyby asteroid along with the time and distance of its closest approach. On days without a cosmic flyby, the report will feature a newly discovered asteroid. It will also highlight an article from the popular press.”

A new Web site will make it easier to track money in Japanese politics. “Starting Oct. 21, the group, which calls itself Japan Center For Money and Politics Foundation in English, will post online the reports of about 2,200 political organizations donating to politicians in both chambers of the Diet. There will also be online explanations of the law regarding political funds, as well as plans to offer training sessions on the most efficient ways of using the site.” The site will be in Japanese only, and unfortunately Google Translate did not have much luck with the site as it currently is.

New-to-me and still under development: an online archive for Minnesota folk songs. “The Minnesota Folksong Collection is an online digital library for audio recordings, song texts and and other materials documenting traditional folksong from Minnesota. The current collection consists of a set of songs recorded by Robert Winslow Gordon in 1924.” Looks like it got rolling at the beginning of the year.

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

The East Riding archives [Yorkshire, England] have joined the Flickr Commons (which is great to see because I was starting to think Flickr Commons was kaput.) “The Archives collect, preserve, and make accessible the cultural heritage of the East Riding of Yorkshire. Their collections originate from a variety of sources including, local government, courts, hospitals, churches, parish councils, businesses, societies, charities, landed estates, as well as private individuals and families. The Archives formed in 1953 and moved to their current location, called the Treasure House, in 2007.”

Yahoo Messenger now supports video. “Launching today, video in Messenger makes it even easier to show rather than tell when you want to share experiences with the people you care about. Now available on both the iOS and Android app globally, you can send videos in one-on-one and group conversations!”

Yahoo Mail for Android now has fingerprint support. Barn doors, horses… “The fingerprint support is via Google’s Fingerprint API, meaning that as long as your device has a fingerprint scanner it should work.”

USEFUL STUFF

Sounds useful! From PC World: How to search the full text of web pages in your Chrome browsing history with Falcon “Falcon describes itself as a ‘full text browsing history search.’ What that means is Falcon indexes the text in the body of nearly every webpage you visit. Then when you need to find something, all you have to do is search for a keyword from any part of the webpage you’re looking for. If you only remember that the page mentions Alabama that’ll be enough.” The article does address privacy and security concerns you’d have with such a tool.

Noupe has a writeup on a free-to-use photo site called Visual Hunt. “The reason why Visual Hunt provides over 350 million high-quality photos is, that the service collects the best images from creative-common, and public-domain websites on the internet. Don’t worry, the service doesn’t accumulate the material from random sources. Instead, it focuses on sources like Flickr, and other services with a good reputation and quality.” Ignore the not-perfect English. This looks like a useful resource.

Thanks to Esther S. for the heads-up: How to Follow Any Twitter User, Search or List via RSS This writeup uses Inoreader.

From Hongkiat, because I know at least a lot of Firehose readers are into travel. Google Trips & 9 Alternative Travel Apps for Avid Travelers. “For those unfamiliar with travel planner apps, you can now easily create your itinerary, book tours, flights, accomodation and car rentals etc. right from your laptop or mobile app. In this list, I have 9 other travel apps apart from Google Trips, each with their own specialty that will probably prove useful for different groups of travelers.”

This is for SQL fans only. My SQL chops are not great, but what I could understand out of this paper I liked: SQL Query Parser: An Automated Tool for Translating the Queries Into Spreadsheets. “Many people find difficulties in working with databases queries so they completely want to migrate from databases to another application. Hence here it is the solution to combine the database concept with another application to make it simple and easy. The concept called spreadsheet is combined with the databases which forms a method which is called as a SQL Query Parser. Spreadsheets are the most popular application for data analysis and manipulations. Thus SQL Query Parser is an automated tool which translates the Database SQL query to Formula based Spreadsheet. Also it parses the statements into the parse tree and generates the syntax tree providing validation to the statements at an early stage.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

Cornell: ‘Likes’ less likely to affect self-esteem of people with purpose “The rush of self-esteem that comes with the ubiquitous thumbs-up of a ‘like’ has more people asking that question, as Facebook and other social media sites offer more ways for friends to endorse photos and posts. But one group seems immune to that rush: people with a sense of purpose. In the first study on the effects of purpose in the online world, Cornell researchers have found that having a sense of purpose limits how reactive people are to positive feedback on social media.” Good morning, Internet…

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United Nations, Livestream Learning, Accessibility, More: Sunday Buzz, September 25, 2016

NEW RESOURCES

This is interesting: the United Nations has launched its own app. “U.N. officials say the SDGs [Sustainable Development Goals – RB] in Action mobile app, which will be promoted today during the Global Citizen Festival in New York, creates a “global forum” for industry, government and citizens to track and promote the U.N.’s Sustainable Development Goals, a set of 17 objectives the organization has set out to achieve by 2030. The app lets users track the progress of the U.N.’s goals at a local, national and global level while also uploading their own videos and other content as a way to show why they care about the SDGs.”

A new tool wants to use livestreaming to help with teaching. “Scriyb is different from other online class tools in that it uses live streaming video and allows interaction through a moderated chat room, where students can interact with each other, and a teacher can guide his or her lecture by seeing responses from the students. The chat was inspired by the chatrooms of online video games, and the streaming follows similar programing that apps such as Periscope use.” Read the article. Looks well thought out.

A bit off-topic, but I call important: an indoor navigation tool for the blind and visually-impaired as been released as an open-source app. “Navatar overcomes a number of the obstacles traditionally associated with indoor navigation systems for blind users. Unlike existing systems, Navatar doesn’t require any instrumentation and only relies on low-cost sensors available in smartphones and a digital map of the environment. Instead, Navatar takes advantage of the architecture of indoor environments, where hallways and other forms of physical infrastructure are already used by blind users to find their way. Navatar offers verbal directions, and users are actively involved by periodically confirming the presence of expected landmarks such as doors or water fountains along their path to ensure they are on track.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Snapchat is launching Snapchat Spectacles. I’m not even kidding. “The high-tech shades will cost $130 and mark the app maker’s first crack at hardware, the Wall Street Journal Magazine reported late Friday. Snapchat Chief Executive Evan Spiegel told the publication that Spectacles are a toy, meant to be worn for fun at events like family barbecues or while on a hike.”

The United Nations and Twitter are teaming up (PRESS RELEASE). “Twitter and UN Global Pulse today announced a partnership that will provide the United Nations with access to Twitter’s data tools to support efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, which were adopted by world leaders last year. Every day, people around the world send hundreds of millions of Tweets in dozens of languages. This public data contains real-time information on many issues including the cost of food, availability of jobs, access to health care, quality of education, and reports of natural disasters. This partnership will allow the development and humanitarian agencies of the UN to turn these social conversations into actionable information to aid communities around the globe.”

Meanwhile, rumors are flying that Google will announce a WiFi router next month. “In the market for a new Wi-Fi router? You may want to wait a bit longer. Google is rumored to have one in the cooker for its October 4 Pixel phone launch, which may seem odd considering it already makes the OnHub router …”

USEFUL STUFF

For those of you into the preservation of audio media, check out this blog post from Stanford: An interdisciplinary solution to sound recording preservation. “Earlier this year the Stanford Media Preservation Lab and Conservation Lab were tasked with figuring out how to playback severely warped paper based disc sound recordings. The recordings in question are from a three disc set titled Man-Talk by Three Great Western Stars and each one-sided disc in the set features a single monologue by John Wayne, Bill Elliott, or Johnny Mack Brown.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

One of Google’s self-driving cars was involved in a pretty bad bust up. “As far as we know, this is yet another case where the human — driving what appears to be a commercial van (as you can see being towed in the background) — was at fault. It’s still notable, however, as one of the worst — if not the worst — accidents one of Google’s cars has ever been in. As you can see in the image above, the entire right door on the Lexus is crumpled in along with a broken window or two.” Happily, no one was hurt.

Instagram, now with 500,000 advertisers. “Today, we’re excited to announce there are more than 500,000 advertisers growing their businesses on Instagram. In just six months, the number of advertisers has more than doubled. And that includes a variety of businesses from around the world. In fact, the top five countries seeing advertiser adoption are the US, Brazil, UK, Australia and Canada.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

The latest voter information leak comes from Louisiana. “Someone accidentally left a database of 2,919,651 records of Louisiana voters online, in yet another leak of voter’s personal data. The database contained names, home addresses, phone numbers, what party the voter is registered to, and what dates he or she voted, among other information. ”

That was zippy: Yahoo has already been hit with lawsuits over the recent huge hack it admitted to. “On Friday, the firms Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd and Labaton Sucharow filed a suit in the US District Court in the Northern District of California. The suit, for which the firm intends to seek class action status, accuses Yahoo of ‘failure to establish and implement basic data security’ and being ‘grossly negligent’ with user data, according to the complaint. It also alleges the company knew of the breach ‘long before’ it was disclosed, but hid it from the public until after its $4.83 billion sale to Verizon.”

My go-to security blog, Krebs on Security, has been shut down after an astounding DDOS attack earlier this week. “Since Tuesday, Krebs’ site has been under sustained distributed denial-of-service, or DDoS, a crude method of flooding a website with traffic to deny legitimate users from being able to access it. The assault has flooded Krebs’ site with more than 620 gigabits per second of traffic — nearly double what Akamai has seen in the past.” Good morning, Internet…

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National Archive GIFs, Voter Registration, Twitter, More: Saturday Buzz, September 24, 2016

NEW RESOURCES

The National Archives has released a big set of animated GIFs on Giphy. Note the article I’m linking to is very funny but does have some bad language. And at least one of the comments includes a GIF with – um – explicit behavior.

Students at MIT have released an app designed to help millennials register to vote. “With an intuitive design and integration with many state-based voter registration websites (28 to date with the rest covered by the national database), users can more reliably confirm if they are registered to vote. Those who are unregistered receive a short sample registration form that displays only the information required to register and the registration deadline for the next election. Votemate users can even find the polling location for the next upcoming election and receive email reminders for it.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Rumors are flying that Twitter will get bought. “CNBC reported Friday that, according to sources, Twitter is in talks with several companies and could soon receive a formal bid. Those companies may include Google and Salesforce.” The more I think about it, the more I think Amazon would be an excellent buyer for Twitter. Another possibility is Snapchat but they don’t have the money. Then I got really silly and started thinking about who would use a worldwide communication network and just got really fat with cash (including $$$ from Google), and I thought: Airbnb! But they still probably don’t have the money or the management structure.

Twitter is allowing you to mark tweets you don’t like. I guess this is to provide quality feedback since Twitter now shows tweets algorithmically by default. (To Twitter’s credit, you can opt-out.) “The feature is apparently rolling out users as we speak, although it seems that it is only available on iOS devices right now, but presumably Android devices and desktop users should be able to expect the feature to arrive eventually as well.”

Google has upgraded its image captioning algo. “Google has announced a new version of its image captioning algorithm that describes the contents of images with 94 percent accuracy. It’s almost as good at writing captions as humans are. It has been trained to emulate descriptions written by real people.”

USEFUL STUFF

Hey! You can now register to vote for Snapchat. (At least in the US.) “Snapchat has embedded TurboVote promo videos between the Stories and Discover pages of the app, which you can access by swiping left on the main Snapchat screen after opening the app.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Facebook has apparently been artificially inflating average viewing time of video. Which, I guess, is why my feed is now full of things like squirrels being cute for 24 seconds. “Facebook told ad buying agency Publicis Media that it likely overestimated average time spent watching videos by a whopping 60% to 80%, according to a letter Publicis sent to clients, which was reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. ”

The Guardian: Yahoo faces questions after hack of half a billion accounts. “Chief among them was why disclosure took so long, both from the date of the hack, almost two years ago, and from the first appearance of the dumped data on the dark web almost two months ago where it was being sold by a user named ‘Peace of Mind’, who had also sold dumps of data from MySpace and LinkedIn. Jeremiah Grossman, head of security strategy at infosec firm SentinelOne, said: ‘While we know the information was stolen in late 2014, we don’t have any indication as to when Yahoo first learned about this breach. This is an important detail in the story.'” The state-sponsored hack claim really bothers me. If you’re going to stay things like that, let’s see some evidence/details/SOMETHING.

Motherboard has an overview of AllMusic, an ancient (in a good way) online music database.

From the Online Journalism blog: Google’s creepy Allo assistant and our rocky relationship so far. “After playing with Allo’s chat prompts for those too lazy to write their own texts, I began to play with the in-conversation Google Assistant bot. Here are the highlights…” Very, very funny. And a good overview of a) how chatbots really aren’t there yet and b) how they might be trying a bit too hard.

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

The Virginia Supreme Court has agreed to hear an appeal over a court database. “The Virginia Supreme Court has agreed to hear an appeal requested by the Daily Press in long-running dispute over whether the state’s Office of the Executive Secretary of the Supreme Court must release a database of court case information.” I freely admit I am not up on state legal structures, but this part made me spray tea everywhere: “OES used to release the database, which it creates using case information from 118 of the state’s 120 circuit court clerks. OES’ decision to now deny access is based on the argument that the court clerks are the true custodians of the records, not OES. The office also has argued that the database is exempt from Virginia’s Freedom of Information Act.” Do what now?

RESEARCH AND OPINION

BloombergQuint: Facebook and Google Have to Open Up. “Martin Sorrell told you so. The WPP boss has railed against the opacity of Facebook and Google for years, calling for independent checks on the effectiveness of advertising on the sites. So when Facebook said on Thursday that it had overestimated the average viewing time for video ads on the social network for the past two years, the veteran ad man was proven right.” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Bahama Companies, LinkedIn Education, Canadian Soldiers, More: Friday Buzz, September 23, 2016

NEW RESOURCES

A new online database purports to show information about companies registered in the Bahamas. “The database by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) circumvents the local register’s costly retrieval fee and incomplete online registry by providing, for the first time, a publicly searchable forum of the names of directors and some shareholders of more than 175,000 Bahamian companies.”

LinkedIn has launched LinkedIn Learning. “The new site was unveiled today in LinkedIn’s offices in San Francisco, and it comes about a year and a half after LinkedIn acquired online learning site Lynda.com for $1.5 billion. A large part of LinkedIn Learning is based on Lynda content, and goes live with some 9,000 courses on offer. Subjects taught through the service include business, technology and creative topics, with courses running the gamut from programming skills to writing and accounting.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Libraries and Archives Canada has an update the digitization process for its WWI soldiers database. “As of today, 333,687 of 640,000 files are available online in our Soldiers of the First World War: 1914–1918 database….Library and Archives Canada is digitizing the service files systematically, from box 1 to box 10,686, which roughly corresponds to alphabetical order.”

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden has a new Twitter handle. “Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden will be taking to social media to post about her work at the Library and the discoveries she makes along the way. Make sure to follow her at @LibnofCongress.”

Minecraft: Education will be here on November 1st. “The version of Minecraft aimed at educators and schools came out of Microsoft’s acquisition of learning game MinecraftEdu earlier this year, which built upon Minecraft to give teachers tools to build lessons around STEM, art, language and more.”

Facebook Messenger, now with polls. “While in a group convo, you can tap a Polls icon in the compose window, or you can also just hit More and then choose Poll. Create your list of choices, submit it, and then your friends will be able to see the poll in the conversation and then vote accordingly.

USEFUL STUFF

Geektime: 10 major languages Google Translate needs and where you can find them now. “In the rush to get the world online, a number of languages feel left behind. Despite talk of English becoming the ironically dubbed lingua franca of the world, not everyone has strong English skills. A number of tongues have plenty of media online, and people want to understand what’s going on in those languages. Still, as Google Translate has so far accommodated 103 languages in its system, many both modern and ancient are missing. Here are ten of the biggest, though this list in no way should be seen as exhaustive.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

From CILIP [Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals]: To boldly go… the librarian’s role in text and data mining. “The relatively new exception to copyright law that we enjoy in the UK, permitting text and data mining (TDM) for the purposes of non-commercial research, offers potential to further knowledge and make scientific and medical breakthroughs. Importantly, the new exception states that any contractual clause which purports to restrict this exception is automatically null and void. Librarians who manage electronic resources and datasets can assist researchers greatly. However, in order to do this they need a robust understanding of the law and to be assertive in their ­relationships with publishers when negotiating or interpreting licence agreements. This article examines the ways in which librarians can facilitate the work of researchers who want to use TDM. It also argues that librarians need to encourage researchers to exploit the new copyright exceptions as key partners in the research process.”

From The New Yorker: Carla Hayden Takes Charge of the World’s Largest Library. “The Library of Congress, which was founded in 1800 to serve the research needs of lawmakers, is home to a hundred and sixty-two million items and hundreds of miles of bookshelves. In 1870, a new copyright law made it a national depository, and it soon became a key resource for scholars and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. But despite the name, few Librarians of Congress have been professional librarians—past Presidents tended to select lawyers, historians, and writers. Franklin D. Roosevelt was once counselled by Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter that ‘only a scholarly man of letters can make a national library a general place of habitation for scholars.’ (Roosevelt appointed a poet, Archibald MacLeish.) Hayden, who holds a doctorate in library science, wants the Library to do more than support legislators and scholars. “We want to grow more scholars,” she said.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

Yahoo has confirmed the hack of HALF A BILLION accounts. Half. A. Billion. “Yahoo chief information security officer Bob Lord wrote in a statement on Yahoo’s Tumblr site that the company had been the victim of a hacker intrusion in late 2014 that accessed at least 500 million accounts and retrieved a bounty of information, including user names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, security questions and answers, and passwords—albeit passwords protected by cryptographic hashing.” Not going to comment on this one yet because I’ll probably melt the monitor.

A new service will let you monitor data leaks for your personal information. “For example, a user can plug in his email address, phone number, and Social Security number as one single record and receive an alert if the MatchLight notices any of the details appearing on the internet. Handing over such personal information to Terbium Labs may set off alarm bells. But the company actually doesn’t store any of that information in its original form. Instead, it creates ‘fingerprints’ of the data through a hashing algorithm done on the client’s own browser.”

Law enforcement will use an algorithm to scan for hate speech on social media. “Police in the US may soon be able to scan social media to predict outbreaks in hate crime, using a computer program being developed at Cardiff University….An algorithm will automatically identify cyber-hate on Twitter in specific regions of the US and look for a relationship between online hate speech and offline hate crime.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

OTHER STUFF I THINK IS COOL

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!