Warsaw Property, Veteran Oral Histories, Pearl Harbor, More: Wednesday Buzz, December 7, 2016

NEW RESOURCES

A new database has been launched to help Holocaust survivors or their heirs reclaim property lost in Warsaw (Poland) during World War II. “Under a new Polish law, people will have just six months to file claims for more than 2,600 properties in Warsaw after those properties are listed publicly in a newspaper or online, something expected to happen soon. Not all of the properties belonged to Jews, but it is believed that many of them did.”

Now available: a digital archive of oral histories from veterans. “A pilot low on fuel, desperately searching for an airfield. Squadron-mates’ empty bunks following combat missions. A family lost to war. These moments — and thousands more — are recalled by veterans in Chronicles of Courage: Stories of Wartime and Innovation, an online video archive of in-depth interviews put together by the Flying Heritage Collection.” There are 335 interviews here. The archive does not seem to focus on any one conflict but appears to be more oriented toward aviation.

A new digital archive of Pearl Harbor eyewitness accounts is now available. “Gripping, and at times chilling, eyewitness accounts by U.S. military personnel and family members in Pearl Harbor at the time of Japan’s 1941 attack can now be accessed online. The site, Pearl Harbor Archive … also carries photos of U.S. warships ablaze and sinking.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Do you ever follow Twitter reenactments? This one looks pretty interesting. “In 1901 ice-harvesting on the Milwaukee River was a big business; families and businesses needed the ice during the warm months to chill their food. When two companies and their employees each believed they had the rights to a stretch of the Milwaukee River, the resulting conflict was wild enough to attract a crowd of thousands on the banks of the river. Listen to their experiences while these nine character[s] live-tweet as if the event is unfolding in real time.” It happens this Friday, December 9th.

USEFUL STUFF

Lifehacker India: Google Docs In G Suite Now Makes It Easy To Add MLA, APA, And Chicago-Style Citations. “If you’re in a rush to get your papers finished before the semester is over, Google can help you with some of the tedious stuff. Now, Google Docs can automatically create citations in your paper in your preferred style.”

This useful item focuses on just one thing – photography – but I was very impressed playing with it. Digital Trends: Most Amateurs Avoid Manual Mode – So One Animator Decided to Simplify Things. “Learning manual modes toss photographers-to-be into a jumbled mix of terms like aperture, shutter speed, ISO, depth of field, noise and blur — but one animator is hoping to make the process a bit simpler. Photography Mapped is a new interactive animation that helps newbies get their feet wet by offering a “hands on” look at manual modes, without the actual camera.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Great article from The Getty Iris: The Database Conservators Built. “AATA, or AATA Online as it’s known today, is a free research database for professionals working in conservation and management of the world’s material cultural heritage—art and cultural objects, architecture, and archaeological sites and materials. With more than 138,000 records, AATA Online covers literature from around the globe from sources as early as the first century BCE. It includes references and abstracts for books, journals, webpages, AV materials, dissertations, and even unpublished manuscripts on topics as varied as radiography, pigments, historic gardens, and the ethics of conservation.”

Al Jazeera: How Facebook hurt the Syrian Revolution. “Erica Chenoweth, a professor at the School of International Studies at the University of Denver, has argued that social media is helping dictators, while giving the masses an illusion of empowerment and political worthiness. At a recent lecture at Columbia University, when asked for an example where social media played a negative role in a social movement, Chenoweth paused a little to finally say, ‘what comes to my mind now is Syria.'”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

When it comes to online security, it looks like MasterCard has one big advantage over Visa. “Criminals can work out the card number, expiry date and security code for a Visa debit or credit card in as little as six seconds using guesswork, researchers have found. Experts from Newcastle University said it was ‘frighteningly easy’ to do with a laptop and an internet connection.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

What a great article from Scientific Computing: Social Sciences & Humanities Researchers Use Supercomputers to Amplify Voices of Black Women Silenced by History. “It’s axiomatic that history is written by the winners. But what if you were part of a group that was so marginalized by society that you often don’t even make it into the history books? This is the case for black women, say a group of social science and humanities researchers who are using supercomputers to shine a light in the dark corners of history to find obscure historical records that point to the presence of black women, even when the women themselves were not able to speak for themselves.”

MIT News: “Google Docs” for life sciences accelerates discovery. “Numerous innovations have hit life science labs in the past decade, such as new techniques for designing DNA and editing genomes. Yet, researchers still rely on older tools — such as paper notebooks, Excel spreadsheets, and email — to manage data collected from those innovations. This means time is wasted organizing, finding, and duplicating information before even starting new experiments. Now MIT spinout Benchling is bringing life science researchers a cloud-based platform that integrates different types of lab software into one place, with aims of making research and development easier, quicker, and more collaborative.”

Monday Note: Facebook’s Walled Wonderland Is Inherently Incompatible With News. “Forgive me for filling this post with so many quotes but… if those who keep whining about Facebook’s negative impact on the 2016 election had read what Facebook repeatedly and plainly stated, they would have been less surprised. As we say in French, ‘c’est écrit sur l’emballage’ (it’s written on the package). If Facebook can’t be criticized for not warning its stakeholders in the news media, it still misled them it two major ways.” Good morning, Internet…

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Google, US Parks, UCSF Clinical Trials, More: Tuesday Buzz, December 6, 2016

NEW RESOURCES

Google has launched a new personal safety app. “Whether it’s hiking alone or walking down a street after dark — sometimes you want to know someone’s got your back. To help you feel safe and give your friends and family peace of mind, today we’re launching Trusted Contacts. This new personal safety app lets you share your location with loved ones in everyday situations and when emergencies arise — even if your phone is offline or you can’t get to it.” Looks like it’s Android-only.

State Scoop has the skinny on an upcoming data repository for park data across the United States. “Next spring, the Trust for Public Land (TPL), a national open space conservation group, will release a wealth of park data through a new website called ParkServe. The data delivered by the new website is intended to guide cities on placement of new recreation areas, while helping citizens take advantage of local parks.”

The University of California San Francisco has launched a university-specific clinical trials site. “The recently launched website aims to reduce the impact of under-enrollment on hundreds of studies at UCSF. As of Dec. 1, there were 1,330 trials in progress on the UCSF Clinical Trials site. Of these, 666 are open and recruiting participants, including 190 open to pediatric patients under 18 and 82 open to healthy volunteers.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Several tech companies are teaming up to crack down on terrorist content. “Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter, and YouTube are coming together to help curb the spread of terrorist content online. There is no place for content that promotes terrorism on our hosted consumer services. When alerted, we take swift action against this kind of content in accordance with our respective policies. Starting today, we commit to the creation of a shared industry database of ‘hashes’ — unique digital ‘fingerprints’ — for violent terrorist imagery or terrorist recruitment videos or images that we have removed from our services.”

The British Fashion Council (BFC) and Google are teaming up. “A new digital educational platform featuring content and stories from top British designers and fashion insiders is now live and available to view for free. The platform has been set up to support the BFC’s Education Foundation and aims to attract future talent into the industry. Content on the platform is comprised of more than 1,000 assets, including 20 multimedia exhibits, 25 videos and three virtual reality experiences, all accessible on desktop, laptop or mobile.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

A crowdsourcing effort is underway to digitize the TV show “Ozark Jubilee”. “The Ozark Jubilee was a live, nationally broadcast country-western variety show originating from the Jewell Theater — ‘the heart of the Ozarks’ — in downtown Springfield from 1955 through 1960. Many country music stars began or advanced their careers by appearing on the Jubilee including Porter Wagoner, Patsy Cline, Brenda Lee, Johnny Cash, and the Philharmonics. Currently over 60 episodes reside in kinescope form in the University of California, Los Angeles Film and Television Archive. With your help, the we will work with UCLA to digitize and make available all viable episodes on a dedicated YouTube channel.”

Bloomberg Quint: Google Looks for ‘Conservative Outreach’ Manager After Trump Election Win. “For most of Silicon Valley, Donald Trump’s U.S. presidential election win was jarring. Google is using its aftermath to burnish its bona fides in Trump’s political orbit. The Alphabet Inc. unit posted a job listing for a manager of ‘conservative outreach’ on its policy team 10 days after the election. The company is searching for a Washington veteran to ‘tell Google’s story in an elevator or from a podium,’ according to the description on Google’s career website.” Considering how much money Google spends on lobbying, this shouldn’t shock anyone.

Wow, do I feel old: one university is sending college acceptance letters via Snapchat. “It may be time to say goodbye to getting college letters in the mail — or even those sluggish online portals that require you to hit refresh several times before you get the answer. In a first, high school seniors who applied to the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will receive acceptances via Snapchat.”

From Poynter: A look at Facebook’s billion dollar 2016 hit on the news ecosystem. “With a little help from advertising analyst Gordon Borrell, I’m estimating that Facebook has sucked well over $1 billion out of print advertising budgets for U.S. newspapers just this year. And that’s at a time when newspapers have seen that figure (once $43 billion a year) fall well below $15 billion.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

From the Bangor (Maine) Daily News: Lawmaker calls for scrutiny of state police use of social media monitoring. “The Maine State Police should explain whether it is using social media to monitor what the public says online, according to a state representative who is calling for a public hearing. A member of the state legislative committee that oversees law enforcement said he could not recall the state police briefing him on its use of Geofeedia, a controversial computer program that monitors public activity on social media. Two law enforcement officers told BDN Portland last week that the Maine State Police has purchased a license for the service.”

Wired: Alexa and Google Home Record What You Say. But What Happens to That Data? “If you got an Amazon Echo or Google Home voice assistant, welcome to a life of luxurious convenience. You’ll be asking for the weather, the news, and your favorite songs without having to poke around on your phone. You’ll be turning off lights and requesting videos from bed. The world is yours. But you know what? That little talking cylinder is always listening to you. And not just listening, but recording and saving many of the things you say. Should you freak out?”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

The Guardian: Google ‘must review its search rankings because of rightwing manipulation’. “Google must urgently review its search ranking system because of ‘compelling’ evidence that it is being ‘manipulated and controlled’ by rightwing propagandists, leading academics have said, after the Observer reported that hate sites are now dominating searches on Muslims, Jews, Hitler and women. Cathy O’Neil, a data scientist and the author of Weapons on Math Destruction, said that unless Google acknowledged responsibility for the problem, it would be a ‘co-conspirator’ with the propagandists.” Good morning, Internet…

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Chilean Political Prisoners, Online Lectures, Chrome, More: Monday Buzz, December 5, 2016

NEW RESOURCES

Now available: a digital archive recording the songs and music of Chilean political prisoners. “Cantos Cautivos (Captive Songs) is a digital archive compiled by Katia Chornik, daughter of two opponents of the dictatorship who survived one infamous detention centre, which was named La Discothèque by agents of the Dina secret police because guards deployed loud music to torture their quarry, or as a soundtrack to the abuse. Chornik spent her childhood in exile, between Venezuela and France, returning to Chile with her parents by the end of the dictatorship. She studied violin and musicology in Chile and the UK.”

New-to-me, from Next Web: FindLectures is curated database of free, mind-expanding talks. “FindLectures is an effort to centralize the vast quantities of free online lectures and talks into one searchable repository of knowledge. It pulls from a number of reputable sources, including Oxford University, TalksAtGoogle, TED, the Library of Congress, and more. At the time of writing, it boasts a catalog of over 25,968 lectures.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Chrome 55 is now available. “For those that may not have realized, Google released the latest version of its Chrome browser into the mainstream earlier this week which brought the popular browser up to version 55. The major update includes no less than 36 security fixes which mitigate a variety of issues including XSS (cross-site scripting), same-origin bypass, and buffer overflow vulnerabilities. Notably, 26 of the fixes were contributed by external researchers who were collectively paid a total of more than $64,000 by Google for their efforts.”

Reddit is cracking down on trolls — apparently also including the CEO, who has admitted to troll-like behavior. “Reddit will start issuing warnings, timeouts and permanent bans to its most abusive trolls, but will also limit the content manipulation capabilities of its own CEO after he apologized today for ethical violations that shook the trust of the online community.”

Google has launched the Google News Lab University Network. “The News Lab University Network will be comprised of an initial cohort of 48 journalism schools from all over the globe. The Network is designed to provide in-person training when possible, and online training materials and support to professors and students on topics ranging from Google tool fundamentals, trust and verification, immersive storytelling, data journalism, advanced search and Google Trends, data visualization, mapping and more. We also want to celebrate and promote academic journalism projects that use Google tools.”

Huh. You can now get prescription Snapchat Spectacles. “In an announcement by Rochester Optical, it seems that they have launched prescription services for the device. The company itself won’t be selling Spectacles (you’ll still have to get your own pair), but they are offering lenses that will be compatible with them, meaning that you’ll have to buy the Spectacles, ship them off to the company who will then cut a special lens that will fit the device.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

It’s not all just documents. From Kotaku: Why Some Video Games Are In Danger of Disappearing Forever. “Years of neglect are eroding gaming history. Cartridges rot in garages, companies horde demos that they will never release, and obscure titles fade into the ether. Some games may even be lost forever.”

Wow. From Recode: Two years after buying Elite Daily, the Daily Mail says the Facebook publisher is worthless. “Elite Daily used to look like a digital publishing success story: Founded by a couple of twentysomethings in 2012, fueled by Facebook growth, then sold for many millions a few years later. Now it is a cautionary tale: The owner of the Daily Mail, the publisher that bought Elite Daily in January 2015, says the New York-based startup has been a bust, and has written down all of its investment in the money-losing company, citing ‘poor performance.'”

Facebook wants to police its livestreams with AI. “Facebook is working on automatically flagging offensive material in live video streams, building on a growing effort to use artificial intelligence to monitor content, said Joaquin Candela, the company’s director of applied machine learning.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

Wow: the entire EU is getting a bug bounty program. “Today the European Parliament approved the EU Budget for 2017. The budget sets aside 1.9 million euros in order to improve the EU’s IT infrastructure by extending the free software audit programme (FOSSA) that MEPs Max Anderson and Julia Reda initiated two years ago, and by including a bug bounty approach in the programme that was proposed by MEP Marietje Schaake.”

A giant data leak has just hit football (or “soccer,” rather, if you’re an American.) “German publication Der Spiegel just released the first in what will be a steady stream of details about corruption in various European football clubs as well as the sport’s players. A group known as “Football Leaks” got its hands on a whopping 1.9 terabytes of data, covering 18.6 million documents — including secret agreements between clubs and players. Basically, it’s the Snowden release of professional football.”

Good grief. From OC Register: Woman sentenced to year in jail for using fake Facebook profile to frame her ex. “A 25-year-old Las Vegas woman pleaded guilty and was immediately sentenced to a year in jail Wednesday for creating a fake Facebook profile to set up an Irvine man with bogus claims of stalking, kidnapping and beating her.” Good morning, Internet…

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iPhones, Washington Newspapers, WordPress, More: Sunday Buzz, December 4, 2016

NEW RESOURCES

Do you have an iPhone with battery problems? Apple has created a new tool to see if you’re eligible for a replacement. “You’ll get a message telling you whether your iPhone is eligible or not –or in my case, a message warning the serial number entered is not valid. If Apple determines your iPhone 6s is one of the affected units, you still have to make an appointment at the Genius Bar, but you get a free replacement battery out of it.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

The state of Washington has added content to its historic newspapers database. “Nearly 50,000 newly digitized pages from historic newspapers based in Centralia, Eatonville, Tacoma and Spokane are being added to the Washington State Library’s online newspaper collection this year. The latest titles are the Centralia Daily Hub (1914-16), The Eatonville Dispatch (1916-61) and Den Danske Kronike (1916-17), a Danish-English publication based in Spokane. The Centralia and Eatonville papers were added this month. Den Danske Kronike was added last summer, along with the Tacoma Evening Telegraph (1886-87).”

WordPress is moving more towards SSL. “We’re at a turning point: 2017 is going to be the year that we’re going to see features in WordPress which require hosts to have HTTPS available. Just as JavaScript is a near necessity for smoother user experiences and more modern PHP versions are critical for performance, SSL just makes sense as the next hurdle our users are going to face.”

Apple wants to be Google Maps with a drone fleet. “Per Bloomberg’s sources, Apple’s drones will be able to collect new mapping data faster than the modified minivan it currently uses. The idea with drones is that mapping data would be more accurate and up to date as Apple can deploy them faster than a minivan that has to navigate traffic. The drones would also be able to collect other data a minivan would struggle with, like street signs or construction occurring in a specific area.”

The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) is proposing changes to mobile ad guidelines. “The proposed changes, which are open for industry comments until Jan. 30, frequently call for companies that serve ads in apps to provide more information to marketers. The new guidelines will call on companies serving in-app ads to tell advertisers whether consumers let the app access their devices’ locations, for example, and to provide further data about users’ whereabouts.”

After a lot of backlash, the NFL is easing up on its social media rules. “About two months ago the NFL implemented a new social media policy that effectively banned teams from posting any video-based content during games. The backlash was tremendous, with fans and teams criticizing the NFL for negatively impacting fan’s social media experiences, especially during a TV ratings slump. But now it seems the NFL has decided to relax these restrictions.”

Twitter has purchased Yes. “Twitter is gaining a social app start-up and a new vice-president of product all in one go. The microblogging firm announced its acquisition of Yes on Thursday as well as the instalment of its CEO and founder Keith Coleman in the long vacant position at Twitter.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Hey! From The Boston Globe: Museums ‘swap’ Instagram accounts to promote one another. “If you scrolled through Instagram Thursday morning and were confused as to why the Museum of Fine Arts was posting pictures of the Leonardo DaVinci exhibit at the Museum of Science; and why the Museum of Science was sharing images of a paint-spattered canvas at Brandeis University’s Rose Art Museum — don’t worry, it’s not a glitch in the app. Your phone is working just fine.”

Your Story: How Baidu intends to give Google tough competition in India this coming year . “Since late 2015, Chinese giants have been eyeing India for investments in Indian companies. But now, several companies like Apus, One Plus, and LeCo are looking at the country as a market where they can aggressively expand their operations. One such recent player is web services company Baidu. Tim Yang, Country Head, India, looks at India as a market of plentiful opportunity. YourStory caught up with Yang when he was in Bengaluru for the GMIC conference, where he spoke at length of Baidu’s India plans.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

USA Today: Hackers use typosquatting to dupe the unwary with fake news, sites. “The proliferation of fake news has shone a light on another murky corner the web, the practice of typosquatting. These are the URLs that pass for common ones — say Amazoon.com instead of Amazon.com — if the user isn’t paying close attention to the Web address.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

From Science Magazine: Q&A: Should all animal experiments be listed in a public registry? “Animal research has a publication problem. About half of all animal experiments in academic labs, including those testing for cancer and heart drugs, are never published in scientific journals, and those that are have been notoriously hard to replicate. That’s part of the reason that most drugs that work in animals don’t work in people—only 11% of oncology compounds that show promise in mice are ever approved for humans—despite billions of dollars spent by pharmaceutical and biotech companies. Meanwhile, academic labs waste money, mice, and other resources on experiments that, unbeknownst to them, have already been done but were never reported.”

Northwestern: Fake news on Facebook is no game, but it can explain game theory . “Game theory allows economists to view problems in the social sciences as ‘games,’ or competitions between self-interested parties who understand that their fates are in some way intertwined. Both parties cannot ‘win’ equally, and so begins the game. Jeff Ely, Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Professor of Economics at Northwestern University, explains Game Theory using the example of fake news on Facebook.” Good morning, Internet…

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Food Safety, Scots Language, Facebook, More: Saturday Buzz, December 3, 2016

NEW RESOURCES

Recently-launched: a Web site focusing on open sourcing food safety plans. “Starting a new food business or processing venture can be daunting, especially considering the proprietary nature of food safety plans and research results necessary to making our food system safe. The goal of the Open Source Food Safety Initiative is to make food safety information available to everyone. Building on concepts first developed by the Open Source Software movement, we aim to make food safety plans and information freely shareable, modifiable, and usable. This website is designed to serve as a forum for sharing, discussing, and collaborating on food safety information.”

A new site from the National Library of Scotland provides information on the Scots language. “The Wee Windaes website … is based on a careful selection of Scots language material from the countless examples in the vast collections of the National Library. The oldest is a performance poem from the 1440s, The Buke of the Howlat, through to the 20th-century writings of novelist and playwright Jessie Kesson. Examples of contemporary writing will be added as the site develops further.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Facebook briefly interfered with / warned about a browser extension designed to detect bogus news on Facebook. “Two weeks ago, web designer Daniel Sieradski created B.S. Detector, a browser extension that alerts users to the presence of unreliable news sources, as a ‘proof of concept to counter [Facebook CEO] Mark Zuckerberg’s dubious claim that Facebook wasn’t in a position to really deal with fake news,’ he tells Quartz. Since then, the plugin has been downloaded and installed about 25,000 times. Today, however, some users attempting to share links to the B.S. Detector website on Facebook were interrupted by a warning from the social media company.”

Google has launched Santa’s Village for the season. “From sliding penguins to dancing elves, the residents of the North Pole are having the time of their lives, and now you can join in the merriment. This year you’ll find several new games in Santa’s Village, including four new ones only available on the Android app — including Present Quest, where you try your hand at recovering Santa’s misplaced gifts out in the real world.”

Snapchat has ditched Story Explorer. “A year after introducing Story Explorer as a way for people to view the events documented in Live Stories from many different angles, Snapchat is narrowing its aperture. Snapchat has removed the Story Explorer feature from its Live Stories, a Snapchat spokesperson confirmed. The discontinued feature may be as much a victim of its own tangled user experience as of Snapchat’s heightened editorial efforts around Live Stories.”

YouTube now supports 4K livestreaming. Just wow. “YouTube enabled support for 4K video on its site back in 2010, and today it’s bringing that same capability to live streaming. Both standard videos and 360 videos will be able to be live streamed in 4K, the company announced this morning.”

Twitter Moments are now available on mobile. “Aptly, Twitter created a Moment to explain the process of building one. Users can access the feature by choosing a tweet and clicking on the gray arrow in the upper right-hand corner. A pop-up window will appear with a tab that reads ‘Add to Moment.'”

Amazon has launched Amazon AI. “Amazon today announced the launch of its new Amazon AI platform at its re:Invent developer event in Las Vegas. This new service brings many of the machine learning smarts Amazon has developed in-house over the years to devs outside the company. For now, the service only makes three different tools available, but the plan is to add more over time.”

USEFUL STUFF

How biased is your Facebook feed? This Chrome extension will give you an idea. “It’s becoming increasingly clear that the internet isolates us into an echo chamber of agreement, rarely putting us in contact with ideas that might challenge us. In response to this, Princeton computer science student Zachary Liu has created a Chrome extension called PolitEcho that quickly analyzes a person’s Facebook data and then spits out some color-coded charts showing just how far to the left or right it leans.”

From New York Magazine, as I’m trying to find more reasons to use Snapchat: Use These Secret Hacks to Find Every Celebrity on Snapchat . “While it’s fairly easy to add personal friends via their names or cell-phone numbers in your address book, adding celebrities, athletes, politicians, and … please forgive me … influencers isn’t as simple, especially if you don’t know their usernames. Unlike other social apps (e.g., Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram) Snapchat does not recommend people for you to follow based on those you already do. You’ve got to do the work yourself.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

From The Washington Post: The 16 most-Instagrammed places of 2016. “Instagram has released its annual list of the world’s most popular spots for taking photos — a veritable who’s who (or, perhaps, a where’s where) of the globe’s top tourist destinations. We’ve compiled Instagram posts featuring the top 16 locations of 2016, to lighten your cold-weather blues. Plus, if you’re making a New Year’s resolution to travel more, this list might spark some inspiration.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

The Intercept: Internet Archive Successfully Fends Off Secret FBI Order. “The archive, a nonprofit online library, has disclosed that it received another [National Security Letter] in August, its first since the one it received and fought in 2007. Once again it pushed back, but this time events unfolded differently: The archive was able to challenge the NSL and gag order directly in a letter to the FBI, rather than through a secretive lawsuit. In November, the bureau again backed down and, without a protracted battle, has now allowed the archive to publish the NSL in redacted form.” Good morning, Internet…

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