Elizabethtown College, Jazz Interviews, Google Spaces, More: Sunday Buzz, February 26, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

Elizabethtown College has digitized and put its student newspaper online. “Elizabethtown College’s High Library and Hess Archives recently digitized its archived school newspapers. These publications that date back to 1904 and continue through 2009, were uploaded to the Internet Archive and are accessible to the public.”

Hamilton College: Jazz Archive Adds Artist Interviews on YouTube. “On the eve of the 100th anniversary of the world’s first jazz recording*, the Hamilton College Jazz Archive has begun to add its more than 300 videotaped interviews with jazz greats onto its YouTube channel.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Well that wasn’t long: Google is shutting down Google Spaces. “Back in May last year, Google announced a new app/service called Spaces. The idea of Space is that it provided users with a platform in which they can share things with each other, although unlike other platforms, Spaces was designed for small group sharing as opposed to larger collaborations.”

Amazon Alexa, now with 10,000 skills. “A YEAR AND a half ago, Amazon opened up its Alexa voice assistant to developers. With the Alexa Skills Kit, Alexa and its hardware hosts—the Echo, Dot, Tap, and now dozens more from third parties—became more than just speakers and digital weathermen. It became a platform, capable of supporting a full ecosystem of skills, which are essentially apps that you talk to instead of touch. Today, there are 10,000 skills available on Alexa. It’s an exponential increase since last summer, a rise that presents a host of new opportunities—and new challenges.”

TechCrunch: Google.org is committing $11.5 million to racial justice. “There is generally a lack of data in the criminal justice system. At the national level, for example, there is very little data about police behavior and criminal sentencing. That’s why Google.org is re-upping its commitment to racial justice through its $11.5 million in new grant money to ten racial justice organizations. This comes after Google.org awarded $3 million to organizations working to advance racial justice last year.”

USEFUL STUFF

Make Tech Easier: How to Back Up Your WhatsApp Data to Dropbox. “Depending on how you set things up, WhatsApp can either back up your data daily, weekly, monthly, never or when you tap ‘Backup.’ When you do back up your chats, they are backed up to Google Drive, but what if you don’t trust Google Drive? Here’s a quick hack to easily back up your WhatsApp content to your Dropbox account.”

It’s about that time again… from NerdWallet: 9 Ways to Get Free Tax Help From a Human Being. “Tax help can cost a lot of money. Pros charge $150 an hour on average to do a federal and state return, according to the National Society of Accountants. Help with planning, back taxes or audits can cost even more. But there are a few ways to get human tax help for free.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

PR Newswire: “Ride Archive” Offers VR Simulations of Lost Theme Park Rides and Attractions (PRESS RELEASE). “‘Anyone who’s been to a theme park has a favorite ride. But what about all the rides that went away before their time and still linger in the childhood memories of grown-ups today?’ So begins a viral video pitch at RideArchive.com that’s received nearly 620,000 views on Facebook. According to concept designer Jay Kristopher Huddy, the Ride Archive represents ‘the future of preserving the past’ by providing VR simulations of decommissioned rides and attractions from your favorite theme parks.” There are some intellectual property issues to be addressed, so I’m not sure this will ever come to fruition – but what a great idea!

A livestream of a pregnant giraffe was pulled from YouTube — for nudity. GIRAFFE NUDITY. “[Jordan] Patch claims that the livestream of its pregnant giraffe April, received 20 to 30 million views in just twelve hours. But with this masses came problems. While the zoo sees the video as education, Patch says that some ‘extremists and animal right activists’ reported the livestream as containing sexually explicit or nude content, which triggered YouTube to pull the video.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

ZDNet: Cybercriminals start cashing in on vulnerable WordPress websites. “It is estimated that up to 1.5 million websites may remain unpatched. However, the situation appears to have worsened. According to researchers from SiteLock, the latest trend in vulnerable WordPress website defacement is the launch of rogue pharmacies. These websites, rather common already online, promise to provide “authentic” erectile dysfunction medication.”

PC Magazine: Google’s Collision Shakes Up Computer Cryptography. “after years of trying, Google found a way to crack the SHA-1 cryptographic hash function, a security building block that enables digital signatures and HTTPS encryption. Cracking SHA-1 requires creating a cryptographic hash collision, which is essentially when a single hash, or ‘digest’ applies to two different files.”

Recode: Alphabet’s Waymo is suing Otto and Uber for allegedly stealing the design of a key self-driving system. “Waymo, formerly Google’s self-driving car unit, is suing Otto — the self-driving trucking company co-founded by former Waymo employee Anthony Levandowski and quickly acquired by Uber — for allegedly stealing the company’s proprietary design for its laser-based radar system.” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Underground Railroad, Women’s Health, Paleontology, More: Saturday Buzz, February 25, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

A new online exhibit explores the Underground Railroad in Fall River, Massachusetts. “A few clicks tell the stories of Sarah Anna Lewis, who beat the odds to become a school teacher in Fall River around 1870, only to lose her position to gender inequality once she was married; and of Henry Box Brown, a well-known fugitive who was a guest in a Fall River abolitionist’s home some years after he shipped himself in a wooden crate from Richmond, Virginia, to Philadelphia in 1849 after his wife and children were sold into slavery, plus many more.”

A new Web site aims to be a Wikipedia-like resource for women’s health around the world. “The concept of Gynopedia is simple: It’s an online, open-source, nonprofit health care database in the style of Wikipedia that offers women free information on a range of issues as they relate to different locations across the globe. You can search by city—say, Los Angeles, or Mumbai—and get specific pages with details on where to go for gynecological exams, emergency contraception, STI tests, and where to find abortion clinics.”

MarketWatch: Threeding and Artec 3D Digitize Unique Private Paleontology Collection (PRESS RELEASE). ” Threeding.com, a leading 3D printing marketplace and community, and Artec 3D, a top-tier developer and manufacturer of 3D hardware and software, today announce its latest digitization project. The two companies are now working together in the field of paleontology by digitally capturing a private paleontology collection, curated and owned by Radoslav Trayanov, one of the largest private collectors in Central and Eastern Europe. The pieces from the collection, which consist of animal remnants, impressions and traces, primarily date back to the Pliocene, Miocene and Paleocene epochs. The printable 3D models are now available for public consumption and can be purchased on Threeding.com.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

USA Today: How to get paid from Facebook to go live. “This week the company said it will begin opening up paid live broadcasting to the general public. That is, folks who have over 2,000 followers and can get at least 300 people to watch one of their live broadcasts concurrently. Facebook will share 55% of the ad revenues with live broadcasters.”

Ooopsie. From CNET: Google issue accidentally crashed Google Wifi, OnHub devices. “If you own a Google Wifi or OnHub router, you may have to do set it up all over again. After investigating reports of faulty devices, Google released a statement to customers Thursday saying an issue with Google Accounts caused many Google Wifi and OnHub routers to reset themselves.”

USEFUL STUFF

Kris Shaffer: Mining Twitter data with R, TidyText, and TAGS. “One of the best places to get your feet wet with text mining is Twitter data. Though not as open as it used to be for developers, the Twitter API makes it incredibly easy to download large swaths of text from its public users, accompanied by substantial metadata. A treasure trove for data miners that is relatively easy to parse. It’s also a great source of data for those studying the distribution of (mis)information via digital media.”

WIRED: How to Shoot a 360 Video. “UNLIKE TRADITIONAL VIDEO cameras, which capture whatever is happening in front of them, 360 cameras capture everything happening in every direction, offering a full spherical view of the surroundings.” This is a great overview if you have a good idea of what 360 cameras are, but want more detail about how they work and how to use them.

From Peg Fitzpatrick: How to Use Hashtags on Instagram . “Hashtags on Instagram? Use them or bag it? That’s the question that Instagrammers face each time they post a photo on Instagram. Maybe you want to use hashtags on Instagram but you’re not sure why or how to use them? This article will help with those questions and give you a solid plan to move forward using hashtags on Instagram.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

TechCrunch: How Pinterest’s visual search went from a moonlight project to a real-world search engine. “Pinterest’s goal was to emulate the service’s core user experience: that sort of putzing around and discovering new products or concepts on Pinterest. Just getting the literal results like you might expect from a Google visual search wasn’t enough to extend the Pinterest experience beyond its typical search — with keywords and concepts — to what you’re doing with your camera. There are other ways to get to that result, like literally reading the label on a bottle or asking someone what kind of shoes they are wearing.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

Naked Security: Twitter users, do you know who’s spying on your web-surfing habits?. “If you weren’t already worried about the privacy dangers of online ad tracking, now would be a good time to start. Researchers have found a way to de-anonymise web surfing records, putting a recent US privacy ruling in jeopardy.”

UGH. From The Economic Times: No legal obligation to weed out objectionable content: Google tells SC . “Internet search engine Google on Wednesday told the Supreme Court it was under ‘no legal obligation’ to scan and weed out videos containing objectionable sexual content on its own in the absence of any specific complaint amid allegations that videos of the alleged rape of a Malayalam actress recently were doing the rounds on the social media.” This is in India. I wonder if this would be the same in the US.

RESEARCH AND OPINION

From SAS, via PR Newswire: SAS enables visually impaired to ‘visualize’ data (PRESS RELEASE). “People with visual impairments are often shut out from hot careers in STEM fields, including analytics and data science. Why? Because the technology is not accessible. That is changing, thanks to SAS® Graphics Accelerator. The software provides unparalleled access to data visualization and data science for people with visual impairments. Until today, students and professionals with visual impairments have suffered from digital data visualization famine. No surprise, since most charts and graphs are created exclusively for visual consumption. SAS Graphics Accelerator dynamically generates alternative presentations of SAS data visualizations, including verbal descriptions, tabular data and interactive sonification.” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Ticket Stubs, World War I Letters, Delaware Parks, More: Friday Buzz, February 24, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

Now available: an online archive (via Instagram) of movie ticket stubs. “[Ben] Smith has collected some real gems so far such as a ticket to The Beatles’ A Hard Day’s Night at the Century’s Huntington in New York and a 1977 ticket for the Orchard Theatre in Singapore. His personal favourite, however, is a Hunger Games Odeon ticket.”

A library in New Zealand has created a Web site with 300 letters from World War I. “The work, which took the eight volunteers more than two years, follows the stories of Charlie McIntyre, Ernie McIntyre, Len Shepard and John Hall, with a combined total of more than 1700 pages of letters transcribed.” The Web site will launch March 1.

A new Web site provides information about public parks in Delaware. “Play Outside is a single online information source that allows users to find public parks as well as exact locations of outdoor recreation facilities within parks and wildlife areas throughout the state. It includes all areas in the public trust managed by towns, cities, counties and state agencies in Delaware. The website is designed to serve those looking for outdoor recreation opportunities, places to be immersed in nature or to conduct active lifestyles. Users can locate parks close to home or in less-developed places such as wildlife areas.”

Washington Post: Google fights online trolls with new tool. “On Thursday, the company publicly released an artificial intelligence tool, called Perspective, that scans online content and rates how ‘toxic’ it is based on ratings by thousands of people. For example, you can feed an online comment board into Perspective and see the percentage of users that said it was toxic.” Because I’m into recursion, I fed this writeup into Perspective to see how toxic it was considered. It got 10%.

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Digital NC has added a bunch of materials from the Masons and there’s a bit of World War I in there.. From the blog post: “New materials from out partner The Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of North Carolina are now online. This batch includes several Minute Books and an Account book from St. John’s Lodge no. 1, Minute books and an account book from Zion Lodge no. 81, speeches from well known North Carolina Free Masons such as William Lander and J.M. Lovejoy, letters of correspondence, and more. One item that may be of particular genealogical interest is a collection of lists of masons who died in World War I. ”

Engadget: Instagram’s carousel-style photo sets are now available to all . “Sometimes one photo just doesn’t tell the whole story. That’s why Instagram has just introduced a new feature where you can combine up to 10 photos and videos in a single post (It’s been teased for awhile, but now it’s finally here). Think of it as a slideshow of different images that your friends can swipe through, be they step-by-step DIY instructions or simply a collection of moments taken at your buddy’s birthday party.”

USEFUL STUFF

From Portent: Don’t Panic: Google Site Search Replacements. “Google’s Site Search product has been around a long time. Pay $100, and you can embed a little Google search engine on your site. They’re keeping Google Custom Search. Sounds great, but there’s a problem…” Ads, specifically. This article lists some options for replacing Google Site Search, but there aren’t many; Google killed a lot of ’em. Does this remind you of anything? LIKE GOOGLE READER?

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Federal News Radio: How Twitter became an outlet of resistance, information for federal employees. “When a former employee of Badlands National Park took over the park’s official Twitter account to tweet climate change facts in direct defiance of the Trump administration, they couldn’t have known that they were starting a movement. Almost one month later, more than 80 accounts claiming to represent various federal organizations and employees, many of them national parks, exist in opposition to the Trump administration and its policies.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

ZDNet: Android ransomware attacks have grown by 50 percent in a year. “Ransomware targeting Android users has increased by over 50 percent in just a year, as cybercriminals increasingly take aim at what they view as an easy ecosystem to penetrate. This, the highest number of attempts to infect Android smartphones and tablets with malicious file-encrypting software so far, comes as users increasingly turn to mobiles as their primary devices, storing more and more valuable data on them.”

Hurriyet Daily News: Over 1,700 arrested over ‘terror propaganda’ via social media across Turkey. “Some 1,734 people have been arrested for ‘making terror propaganda’ on social media since the failed July 2016 coup attempt, state-run Anadolu Agency has reported. ‘Cyber-police’ working on identifying suspects making terror propaganda online have so far detained at least 3,894 people out of 22,088 identified by police since the coup attempt. ”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

TechCrunch: Google’s latest research aims to make mixed reality videos a little less alien. “Game publishers like Owlchemy Labs and Radial Games have done some of the most extensive work on mixed reality setups and have shared their findings with the greater VR game dev community. Many of the issues of reckoning a human avatar in a digital world have been accounted for in these efforts but today, Google revealed in a blog post that its been working on a strange little project to go the last mile in making these MR videos even more realistic by bringing the user’s face back into these videos.”

From Bloomberg, and the article is way better than the headline: Social Media Are Driving Americans Insane. “Social media use has skyrocketed from 7 percent of American adults in 2005 to 65 percent in 2015. For those in the 18-29 age range, the increase is larger, from 12 percent to a remarkable 90 percent. But while an increase in social media usage is hardly surprising, the number of people who just can’t tear themselves away is stark: Nowadays, 43 percent of Americans say they are checking their e-mails, texts, or social media accounts constantly. And their stress levels are paying for it: On a 10-point scale, constant checkers reported an average stress level of 5.3. For the rest of Americans, the average level is a 4.4.” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Dublin Photography, Australia Education, Tilt Brush, More: Thursday Buzz, February 23, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

The Dublin City Council of Dublin, Ireland, has released an online archive of photographs. “From today, you can search documents online by archive, date, location for free. The pictures show events like the Eucharistic Congress and the North Strand Bombing (some of which were taken as proof for insurance).” There are 43,000 pictures in the archive.

NewsMail: Government launches website to help families with homework. Government of Australia, that is. “Member for Hinkler Keith Pitt said the Federal Government’s new website, Learning Potential Resources, was filled with hundreds of ideas, activities, games and videos to help parents of primary school children get involved in their child’s learning.” As an American I was able to access several different items on this site so homeschoolers, you might find this useful. It covers Years 1 through 6 – looking at the learning standards I would guess that Year 1 is roughly equivalent to first grade in America. Teachers or anyone else more knowledgeable about the education system, please chime in the comments.

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Google’s Tilt Brush is now available for the Oculus Rift. “Tilt Brush defies description even more than most VR experiences, but basically you paint in 3D. But when I say ‘paint,’ I don’t just mean oily brush strokes on canvas — you can also paint with light, or fire, or even music.”

Google is making some tweaks to Google Sheets. Thank goodness. “We’re working hard to ensure that Google Sheets meets your business needs. As part of that effort, today we’re introducing several enterprise-friendly features that you’ve been asking for in Sheets on the web, Android, and iOS.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Is Facebook getting into live sports, too?. “Facebook is in talks to stream one Major League Baseball game a week during the upcoming season, according to a report Tuesday by Reuters.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

Chrome users, stay on the alert. From Neowin: Chrome pop-up pretends to be a font pack update to install malware. “Spotted by Mahmoud Al-Qudsi of security firm NeoSmart Technologies, the hack was seen on a compromised WordPress website. It utilizes Javascript to change the text rendering on the page, which will then resemble mis-encoded text with symbols and other random characters when displayed to the user.”

Naked Security: Facebook rapped for dragging its feet on pictures stolen for ‘like-farming’. “It’s a bogus content format has been a problem on Facebook for years without anyone, including at times Facebook, paying much attention. Its purpose it is to attract gullible followers and appreciation which is exploited to promote all sorts of web frauds.”

Livestream in Cardiff courts, go to jail. “A man who filmed and live-streamed a court case in Cardiff has been jailed for 28 days. David Davies, 39, from Llantwit Fardre, Rhondda Cynon Taff, was broadcasting the footage on to Facebook as a person gave evidence at Cardiff Crown Court on Monday.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

Health IT Central: Forty-three per cent of UK healthcare professionals use Google to search for treatments. PROFESSIONALS. Not patients. “Forty-three per cent of healthcare professionals in the UK use Google search to look for treatments of their patients, Google’s Business Lead for healthcare clients said at an event in London today. Speaking at Google’s HQ in the capital, Shivalika Singh added that, while this is ‘only’ a search, it is also playing an ‘important’ role when it comes to the decision-making process, emphasising that the search acts as a ‘new stethoscope’ or a new ‘medical consultant’.” A medical consultant with non-transparent algorithms!

Phys.org: Historic cultural records inform scientific perspectives on woodland uses. “Scientists at the University of York and University College Cork have investigated how cultural records dating back 300 years could help improve understanding of the ways in which science interprets the many uses of woodland areas. The researchers hope that the work will give a cultural narrative to environmental data collected over time, but also give new insight into the ways in which woodland management systems can be adapted to increase a sense of ownership amongst communities that live near woodland areas.”

Bloomberg Quint: Consumers Don’t Want Amazon or Google to Help Them Shop. “Stores are spending lots of time and money trying out new, fancy technologies such as touchscreen mirrors in changing rooms and robo-assistants out in the racks to get consumers to buy more. Shoppers couldn’t care less.”

And in our “you should really just relax” department: Two seconds is all it takes to frustrate selfie uploaders. “A new study undertaken by Ericsson and Vodafone Germany has found that a mere two-second delay in uploading a selfie over Facebook is enough to cause stress among smartphone users. Neuroscience was used in the study to understand how network performance affects subscriber emotions, stress levels and operator brand.” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

19th Century Slavery, Stanford University, Yahoo UK, More: Wednesday Buzz, February 22, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

From Philly.com: Families torn apart by slavery sought lost loved ones in newly archived ads. “The goal of ‘Last Seen: Finding Family After Slavery’ is an online databAase of these snapshots from history, which hold names of former slaves, owners, traders, plantation locations, and relatives gone missing. So far, project researchers have uploaded and transcribed 1,000 ads published in six newspapers from 1863 to 1902: the South Carolina Leader in Charleston, the Colored Citizen in Cincinnati, the Free Man’s Press in Galveston, the Black Republican in New Orleans, the Colored Tennessean in Nashville, and the Christian Recorder, the official organ of the African Methodist Episcopal Church denomination published at Mother Bethel.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Stanford: Archives launches women, LGBTQ and communities of color initiative. “The Stanford University Archives is proud to announce an ongoing initiative to acquire, process and digitize materials documenting Stanford women, the LGBTQ community, and communities of color.”

From Yahoo UK: Yahoo announced global content partnerships with The Telegraph, the Guardian, The Independent, Evening Standard and Hearst UK. “The move enables the publishers to distribute content via a curated feed, created in partnership with Yahoo in five countries, the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, India and Singapore.”

Engadget: WhatsApp status updates now look a lot like Snapchat. ” In a confirmation of rumors from the fall, WhatsApp has overhauled its status feature with an option to share photos and videos much like you would in Snapchat Stories.”

YouTube will be livestreaming the BRITs. “Famous YouTube funnyman Caspar Lee will bring you top gossip from the event on the official BRITs channel. And just who might Caspar be rubbing shoulders with? ROYALTY. Pop royalty, that’s who. This year’s bill is topped by Brit legends and international superstars and includes performances from Ed Sheeran, Katy Perry, Bruno Mars, Robbie Williams, Emeli Sandé, Little Mix, The 1975 and U.K. sensation Skepta. ”

USEFUL STUFF

TheNextWeb: This Chrome extension blocks audio and video autoplay on any website. Sounds good to me! “To the dismay of netizens across the world, last week Facebook announced plans to start autoplaying audio on videos as you scroll through your timeline. But fret no more as there’s an app that can block all the impendent cacophony – on Facebook and everywhere else.”

Shake Up Learning: Free G Suite Training On Demand for Teachers and Students. “Ready to take your Google skills to the next level? No time for extended workshops and training, but need hands-on guidance? Need an easy way to help students learn and navigate Google Classroom, Gmail, Docs, etc.? This awesome G Suite Training Chrome Extensions from Google is just what you need!”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

This article from Polygon is an excellent “behind the scenes” look at YouTubing for a living: The three reasons YouTubers keep imploding, from a YouTuber. “I go by ‘slowbeef,’ and I’ve been doing Let’s Plays and related content since about 2007. I’m certainly not rich off of, or successful from my videos, but I run in those circles because I’ve been doing it for so long in addition to my day job. Some people even consider me a progenitor of it. I talk to a lot of the A-Listers — the people whose names you know — rather often and I have some insight into that world. I have one foot in the door, and see a lot of what goes on behind the scenes.”

Washington Post: Why Verizon is still buying Yahoo on sale, despite that epic security breach. “When reports surfaced last week that Verizon was renegotiating its deal to acquire Yahoo, some analysts were stunned to learn how little of a price cut the telecom giant was seeking — about $250 million — despite the Web company’s well-known missteps with customer security. But on Tuesday, the two companies ultimately agreed to a discount of $350 million, or about 7 percent.” It must be nice to have that much money to whiz away. I think Verizon going ahead is a terrible idea.

RESEARCH AND OPINION

FedTech: Federal Officials Should Disclose Vulnerabilities for Security’s Sake. “Generally, government serves its goals best by disclosing vulnerabilities. When federal leaders take advantage of existing flaws to circumvent computer security, the only difference between their activity and criminal hacking is a legal one. As a technical matter, the two are indistinguishable.However, any vulnerability the government exploits could be used by criminals as well. When the government sits on a newly discovered vulnerability, it exposes innocent users to increased risk.”

New York Times: What Facebook Owes to Journalism. “Local news is weak in large part because the business models have collapsed. The main reason: As advertising spending shifted from print, TV and radio to the internet, the money didn’t mostly go to digital news organizations. Increasingly, it goes to Facebook and Google. Of the $59 billion spent on all digital advertising in 2015 — across millions of web sites, by millions of advertisers — $36 billion went to those two companies. ”

OTHER STUFF I THINK IS COOL

Oh, why not. From The Drum: Oreo’s latest gimmick lets fans virtually launch cookies into space via Google Earth. “Mondelez’s Oreo has rolled out a mobile game that lets fans of the cookie brand launch Oreos into space and watch them fall into glasses of milk all over the world.” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!