LGBT Events, Apollo Theater, PACER, More: Wednesday Buzz, February 15, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

A new Web site provides information on LGBT events worldwide. “So far, the website has over 5,000 events listed for more than 45 countries and 700 cities. ProudOut is working its way toward becoming the go-to source for LGBT events and social groups worldwide.” When I looked it was just under 5000 events, and countries from Argentina to Viet Nam were represented. The site says it’s been online since 2016 so it might be just new-to-me.

The Smithsonian has started a new project to crowdsource the transcription of Apollo Theater cards. ” To manage the Theater, the Schiffmans kept a number of different types of records, including ‘booking cards,’ organized by the name of the artist, which detail the dates of performances; fees paid; and brief, but often quite candid, opinions on the quality of the performances, the performers and their drawing power (or lack of it). These helped the Schiffmans to determine future bookings and contracts.” This project just launched and already has 22 contributors!

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Heh. The Internet Archive is offering to host PACER data. “On Tuesday, February 14, the U.S. Congress will hold the first hearings in over a decade examining the operation of the PACER system. The hearing will be before the Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet of the Judiciary Committee in the House of Representatives. The Internet Archive was pleased to accept the committee’s invitation to submit a statement for the record and we have submitted the following, which includes an offer to host the PACER data now and forever to make the works of our federal courts more readily available to inform the citizenry and to further the effective and fair administration of justice.”

Mashable: Twitter launches, and then kills, an anti-abuse effort within hours . “Twitter is trying to listen to users when it comes to abuse, apparently. And that means rolling out a fix and killing it in short order.”

The Industry London: Google launches Fashion Week Search with Launchmetrics and GPS Radar. “Google has launched a new Fashion Week Search function this season to allow top designers and brands (including Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Burberry, Marc Jacobs, Calvin Klein and more) to post content directly to Google Search, before, during and after their shows.” I discovered that this works even if you inadvertently type fashion wek.

USEFUL STUFF

MakeUseOf:
How to Use Google Forms for Your Business
. “When you need to create a form for your business, it is essential that you have an easy-to-use tool. This is where Google Forms can come in to help you. With useful templates, helpful features, and an intuitive interface, you can quickly build and customize the exact form you need.” Nice overview.

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

WIRED: Diehard Coders Just Rescued NASA’s Earth Science Data. “Groups like DataRefuge and the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative, which organized the Berkeley hackathon to collect data from NASA’s earth sciences programs and the Department of Energy, are doing more than archiving. Diehard coders are building robust systems to monitor ongoing changes to government websites. And they’re keeping track of what’s already been removed—because yes, the pruning has already begun.”

MIT Technology Review: Imagining the Future of VR at Google. “Jessica Brillhart is the principal filmmaker for virtual reality at Google, where she enjoys one of the most creative jobs in Silicon Valley. She makes VR experiences (including World Tour, the first film made with Google’s Jump system, a circular 16-camera rig designed to capture VR films) and conventional movies (or ‘flatties,’ as she calls them), and she evaluates new VR technologies, such as Google’s own Cardboard, a cheap headset that works with smartphones. She spoke to MIT Technology Review’s editor in chief, Jason Pontin.”

TechCrunch: Facebook is pushing record labels to let you soundtrack your videos. “How can Facebook and Instagram make their amateur videos more interesting than those you see on Twitter or Snapchat? A killer soundtrack. That’s why Facebook is now pressing record labels even harder for a licensing deal.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

Network World: University attacked by its own vending machines, smart light bulbs & 5,000 IoT devices. “A university, attacked by its own malware-laced soda machines and other botnet-controlled IoT devices, was locked out of 5,000 systems.”

From the US Department of Justice: Snapchat Videos Lead To Gun Arrests And Charges. “Three men, including two former felons, were arrested and face criminal charges after posting videos on Snapchat of themselves illegally shooting firearms which included a stolen firearm, announced U.S. Attorney Daniel G. Bogden of the District of Nevada and Special Agent in Charge Aaron C. Rouse of the FBI Las Vegas field office.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

Ars Technica: Handful of “highly toxic” Wikipedia editors cause 9% of abuse on the site. “We’ve all heard anecdotes about trolling on Wikipedia and other social platforms, but rarely has anyone been able to quantify levels and origins of online abuse. That’s about to change. Researchers with Alphabet tech incubator Jigsaw worked with Wikimedia Foundation to analyze 100,000 comments left on English-language Wikipedia. They found predictable patterns behind who will launch personal attacks and when.” Good morning, Internet…

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Exoplanets, Social Sciences Research, Louisiana Jobs, More: Tuesday Buzz, February 14, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

Now available: a new database for finding exoplanets. “Today, a team that includes MIT and is led by the Carnegie Institution for Science has released the largest collection of observations made with a technique called radial velocity, to be used for hunting exoplanets. The huge dataset, taken over two decades by the W.M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii, is now available to the public, along with an open-source software package to process the data and an online tutorial.” I had to look up what an exoplanet is. Space.com has a good overview.

A new tool hopes to allow easier access to social sciences research. “MetaBUS… is search engine containing more than a million quantitative findings across 25 years of research and 20-plus journals related to the fields of management, including human resource management and organizational behavior, and psychology, including industrial-organizational and personality. Students and faculty using metaBUS can search over 4,000 topics that are hierarchically arranged. Broader topics, such as job performance and cognitive ability contain narrower ones, such as specific task performance and job knowledge.” I mentioned MetaBUS last May when it seemed release was imminent, but I didn’t hear anything else about it until now.

A new Web site provides information on hospitality jobs in Louisiana. “The site is free for job seekers and offers the capability to search more than 500 open positions available at any given time, upload or build their resume by creating a profile, and offers resources for job seekers to boost their candidacy with industry-based certifications.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

YouTube Kids is getting some updates. “Our Original Content team under Susanne Daniels is adding four new Original series to YouTube Red, created especially with the YouTube Kids app in mind. These new series will feature top creators: DanTDM , Joe and Cody of TheAtlanticCraft, popular tween music act L2M, and Fruit Ninja. This marks the first time YouTube Red has invested in creators who are producing original programming for family audiences. These series will debut starting in the spring. Additional shows are in development and will premiere throughout 2017.”

Flickr has turned 13. “For the next year, we’ll be connecting photographers and their work in new, interesting ways and we can’t wait for you to be a part of the journey with us. Throughout this month we’re putting a call out to the Flickr Community to create a gallery with their favorite 13 images. Tag the first photo with #Flickr13 and we’ll feature our favorites on the Flickr Blog and social media.” Most of the photographers I know who used Flickr have left. YMMV.

USEFUL STUFF

DigitalNC has created an “exhibit page” for its African-American newspaper collections. “In North Carolina, the first African American papers were religious publications. The North Carolina Christian Advocate, which appears to be the earliest, was published from 1855-1861 by the North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, followed by the Episcopal Methodist, a shorter-lived publication produced during the Civil War by the same organization. After the Civil War, the number of African American newspapers continued to grow in North Carolina, reaching a peak during the 1880s and 1890s with more than 30 known titles beginning during that time.”

More goodies from Amit Agarwal: See the Email Sender’s Company and Logo in your Gmail Inbox. “The default layout of your Gmail inbox has the sender’s name listed in the left most column followed by the subject and the date of the message. The emails are sorted in reverse chronological order with the newest messages listed at the top. The problem with this layout is that you cannot figure out who the actual sender of a message is without actually opening the email.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

MakeUseOf: Fake News Is Exposing You to Malware!. “Fake news isn’t just spreading an alternative truth. Sites delivering fake news also serve up something more immediately dangerous (depending on who you ask): malware. Is the risk posed by fake news peddlers real? Or is the risk only as real as the fake news?”

TorrentFreak: Change.org Petitions Used For Pirate Movie Downloads. “The Change.org petition website has more than 100 million users and is used for causes big and small. However, in recent times it’s been put to a more unusual use. Pirates have been creating petitions containing links to infringing movies and people have been joining up to vote.”

Techdirt:
Oracle Files Its Opening Brief As It Tries (Again) To Overturn Google’s Fair Use Win On Java APIs
. “As was widely expected, back in October, Oracle announced its appeal of Google’s big fair use win, concerning its reuse of certain Java API components in Android. If you’ve been following this (long, long, long) case, you’ll recall that Google has won twice at the district court level. The first time, Judge William Alsup correctly noted that APIs were not subject to copyright, because copyright law clearly states that copyright protection does not apply to “any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery” and an API is a process, system or method of operation. However, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC), who only had jurisdiction over the case because it initially involved a patent issue, seemed unable to understand that an API is different from software and overturned the lower court’s sensible ruling.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

WIRED: How to Keep Your AI From Turning Into a Racist Monster. “As the tech industry begins to create artificial intelligence, it risks inserting racism and other prejudices into code that will make decisions for years to come. And as deep learning means that code, not humans, will write code, there’s an even greater need to root out algorithmic bias. There are four things that tech companies can do to keep their developers from unintentionally writing biased code or using biased data.”

Newswise: Wikipedia Readers Get Shortchanged by Copyrighted Material. “When Google Books digitized 40 years worth of copyrighted and out-of-copyright issues of Baseball Digest magazine, Wikipedia editors realized they had scored. Suddenly they had access to pages and pages of player information from a new source. Yet not all information could be used equally: citations to out-of-copyright issues increased 135 percent more than issues still subject to copyright restrictions.” Good morning, Internet…

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Sephardic Ballads, Legal Action, Twitch, More: Monday Buzz, February 13, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

A new collection of Eastern Sephardic Ballads is now available online. “The Benmayor Collection of Eastern Sephardic Ballads and Other Lore is a collection of over 140 audio recordings gathered by Dr. Rina Benmayor in Seattle and Los Angeles during the 1970s. In conjunction with her visit to the University of Washington in 2014, and working together with the Sephardic Studies Program and Stroum Center for Jewish Studies, Dr. Benmayor organized, catalogued, and digitized her recordings and kindly contributed them to the Sephardic Studies Digital Collection.”

A new Web site was designed to help people crowdfund legal actions. “When online crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter and GoFundMe debuted, people hoping to invent and sell a better bottle opener, those in need of help with medical bills and all sorts of personal would-be fundraisers talked about the concept in grand, world-changing ways. This, they said, was a disruptive, potentially transformative financial development. A new website aims to mash up that kind of popular Internet fundraising with legal work, hoping to turn legal cases into publicly funded — and backed — social causes.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Twitch streamers can now create their own communities. “In practice, Communities will look similar to the existing game directories. Streams must be a part of the Community’s specific theme. The feature will be available today. Users can make or discover new Communities via the directory. The tools allow users to customize a landing page, appoint moderators, establish rules, and feature select broadcasts. All Communities are public and have a designated Community Leader, who can ban or timeout channels at their discretion.”

USEFUL STUFF

From Witness.org: Tips for Livestreaming Protests in the United States. “Livestreaming can be a powerful tool for human rights documentation. It can allow people from all around the world to view a scene as if they were there, it can document serious violations of human rights, and it can even be used to defend activists from criminal charges or in excessive force cases against the police. But livestreaming also has risks, both for those being filmed and those doing the filming.”

A new-to-me tool helps users assess their MongoDB databases for security. “More than 25,000 MongoDB instances were targeted by hackers. Information was encrypted and money was asked for the decryption keys. In some cases information was wiped with no way to recover it. Mongoaudit tackles this problem and more. It not only detects misconfigurations, known vulnerabilities and bugs. It also gives advice on how to fix problems and recommends best security practices.”

TheNextWeb has a writeup on a tool that helps users automatically find and download the right captions for what they’re watching. “Built by Dutch developer Giel Cobben, Caption is a nifty app for desktop that lets you find and download the right subtitles for any movie or television show you want to see. What is particularly handy about Caption is that it will also automatically rename the subtitles so they match the title of the movie.”

Search Engine Journal: Communication Overload: Keeping Up with Google Search’s Constant Updates. “If you’re reading this right now, it means you’re invested in search engine optimization.” No, I’m not. But I am interested in searching better and that means knowing how the data pool I’m searching ranks its content.

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

TorrentFreak: Google Drive Uses Hash Matching to Detect Pirated Content. “Google Drive allows users to store any files they want but the cloud hosting service actively prevents users from sharing or distributing copyrighted files. While Google doesn’t go into the finer details of its detection methods, it uses file-hashes to detect infringing content.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

If you have a WordPress site – especially a self-hosted WordPress site – please read this blog post from Wordfence. “In this report we share data on the ongoing flood of WordPress REST-API exploits we are seeing in the wild. We include data on 20 different site defacement campaigns we are currently tracking. We show how attackers have switched to the REST-API exploit and how it has increased their success rates. We have also seen an evolution in the attack method targeting the REST-API exploit and have evolved our rule-set accordingly. We also demonstrate how hackers are competing to deface sites using the REST-API exploit.”

Looks like Arby’s has suffered a data breach. “Sources at nearly a half-dozen banks and credit unions independently reached out over the past 48 hours to inquire if I’d heard anything about a data breach at Arby’s fast-food restaurants. Asked about the rumors, Arby’s told KrebsOnSecurity that it recently remediated a breach involving malicious software installed on payment card systems at hundreds of its restaurant locations nationwide.” Looks like this is one of those weird ones where the corporate-owned stores were impacted and the franchises were not.

Radio Free Asia: Facebook ‘Likes’ Conviction Upheld by Cambodian Appeals Court. “An appellate court on Thursday upheld opposition party leader Sam Rainsy’s defamation conviction for claiming Prime Minister Hun Sen’s media team pumped up the Cambodian leader’s Facebook presence with fake supporters.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

Pando: Twitter’s dismal performance gives Dorsey another excuse to finally act on Trump. “Growth has slowed, revenue is flat and investors seem to have finally lost patience with Dorsey’s stewardship of the ailing company. And yet… just a few hours earlier, I sat in the ShiftForum conference room listening to a well-respected tech mogul (again, I’m hamstrung by Chatham House rules so you’ll have to guess who) describing Donald Trump as ‘the best thing to happen to Twitter.’ The response elicited a murmuring of agreement from others on the stage. The audience seemed far less convinced. I’m with the audience — but the real problem for Jack Dorsey is he’s screwed either way.” Good morning, Internet…

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ProQuest, Baseball Music, Dark Web, More: Sunday Buzz, February 12, 2017

NEW RESOURCES

ProQuest has launched a “displaced researchers” program (PRESS RELEASE). “ProQuest has launched a program to provide no-cost access to its databases for students and researchers who have been separated from their universities and libraries because of travel bans or other immigration changes. The company has an email hotline ContinueMyResearch@proquest.com where these displaced researchers can arrange for access to the materials they need to continue their work.”

The Library of Congress has aggregated a collection of baseball-related music. “This exhibition features baseball sheet music from the collections of the Music Division at the Library of Congress. Most of these works are original copyright deposits and represent only a small fraction of the more than 400 published songs about baseball in the Music Division’s custody. They illustrate the remarkable congruence between the evolution of the sport from before the Civil War to the present, and the musical counterparts that have chronicled in song baseball’s greatest moments.”

Motherboard: New Tool Takes Mere Minutes to Create Dark Web Version of Any Site. “…a security researcher is trying to attract even more organizations to Tor hidden services, with a relatively easy-to-use tool that streamlines the site creation process. And as an aside, technically anyone can make a dark web version of whatever site they fancy. ‘The goal is to do the heavy lifting of “onionification” of websites, so that if an organization wants to run its own onion site, 90 plus percent of the work is done for them,’ Alec Muffett, an independent security researcher who designed the tool, told Motherboard in a Twitter message. ”

In development: a digital archive for the mementos left after the 2016 attacks in Nice, France. “Authorities and volunteers in Nice have removed thousands of mementoes laid out for victims of last summer’s truck rampage as the city readies for its annual carnival, its biggest public event since the Islamist attack that killed 86 people. Authorities plan to preserve some of the poems, photos and other objects draped over the bandstand at the city’s seafront Promenade des Anglais and move others online as a permanent memorial.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

TechCrunch: Q&A site Quora clamps down on anonymity – will review content before publishing, restricts actions. “Quora, a crowdsourced Q&A site that’s generally smarter than Yahoo Answers, is making a big change to how anonymity works on its service. Most notably, it will begin cracking down on spam and harassment by reviewing all anonymous content before it’s distributed on its network, the company says. Anonymous users will also no longer be able to unduly influence other aspects of the Q&A process, as anonymity will now only be supported for asking questions or sharing answers, not things like voting or commenting.” Quora is one of the few digest e-mails that I look forward to. Can’t blame them for proactively taking this step.

Genealogy timeline tool Twile is now free for everybody. “Twile is a UK-based interactive timeline of everything that’s ever happened in your family. The timeline consists of photos and milestones—such as births, marriages, and deaths—that tell the story of your family from your earliest known ancestor right through to today. Family historians can import their family tree from any online genealogy service and then add more recent events from their own life before inviting family members to explore and contribute.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Digiday: News publisher Attn is crowdsourcing Facebook Live coverage. “On January 18, Attn aired a two-hour Facebook Live covering a political protest/dance party in front of vice president Mike Pence’s house in Indiana. Then, two days later, Attn aired an hour-long live stream from Washington D.C., where several marijuana advocacy groups were handing out joints and protest signs during Donald Trump’s inauguration. In both instances, Attn did not send any members from its three-person Facebook Live to the protests. Instead, the content was recorded by pre-selected protesters already planning to attend both events, with a producer from Attn’s Facebook Live team managing the camera feeds for each live stream remotely.”

Mashable: A Twitter bug has birthed a fiery Trump conspiracy theory. Here’s what’s real about it. “…as exciting as a conspiracy to censor feedback about Twitter’s most notorious user could be, the likely reality is something far less sinister. Twitter’s technical infrastructure is breaking under the power of Trump’s tweets—causing an old product bug to rear its ugly head.”

Wired: Forget New Users. Twitter Needs to Find New Ads. “Thursday, Twitter said it pulled in $638 million in total ad revenue in the quarter—down one percent compared to the same time last year. The root of the decline? Direct-response ads and promoted tweets, the ad formats most at home in Twitter’s fast-scrolling, constantly refreshing stream, are fading. As Facebook and Snapchat can tell you, the present and future of advertising is video. To fully be a part of it, Twitter’s going to have to either fundamentally rethink its platform, or find a new kind of ad future.”

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

Law360: Google Hit With $20M Jury Verdict Over Malware Patents. “A Texas federal jury awarded an inventor and the family of his late partner $20 million in damages Friday, after finding Google had infringed on three of their patents for malware protection software.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

T.H.E. Journal: Social Media Impacts College Admissions Officers’ View of Students. “Most people are aware by now that some college admissions officers check students’ social media pages (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc.) when vetting through applications. A new study from Kaplan of 365 college admissions officers at top national, regional and liberal arts colleges and universities around the country found that while the number of admissions officers who check social media has slightly decreased, more admit that what they find online impacts their view of students.”

University of Illinois: Illinois researcher generates random ‘reactions’ to consider how Facebook uses our information. “University of Illinois researcher Ben Grosser has created a web browser extension he calls Go Rando that randomly chooses one of Facebook’s six reactions whenever you click ‘like.’ His intention is not to help you confuse or alienate your friends, but to obfuscate your recorded feelings to Facebook.” Good morning, Internet…

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OMDb API, WhatsApp, Google Street View, More: Saturday Buzz, February 11, 2017

There’s a Web site called the OMDb API, at http://www.omdbapi.com/ , and it’s run by a guy called Brian Fritz. His Web site is an invaluable way to easily get information on movies and import it into Google Spreadsheets or manipulate it some other way. He’s a small operation and recently has been having problems keeping his server up. If you want to help a small operation, please consider supporting him on his Patreon page. His goal is modest; $450 a month keeps his servers going. If there’s any interest I can write an article about how to use his site’s API with Google Spreadsheets. Thank you.
DISCLAIMER: Mr. Fritz doesn’t know me. He didn’t ask for this. I’m a long-time fan of his site.

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

WhatsApp now has two-factor. “After announcing the feature last fall, WhatsApp is ready to drop the beta tag and release two-step verification to each of its 1.2 billion users on iOS, Android, and Windows devices.”

Areas in Africa are newly-available in Google Street View. “We’re excited to announce that starting today, you can take virtual tours of some of the most iconic landmarks and monuments in Ghana, Senegal and Uganda. With this launch, Street View now covers 81 countries from across the world, and 7 in Africa.”

Instapaper has had a bit of an outage bump. “After spending multiple hours on the phone with our cloud service provider, it appears we hit a system limit for our hosted database that’s preventing new articles from being saved. At this time, our only option is to export all data from our old database and import it into a new one. We expect the service to be fully recovered today, February 9.”

Gizmodo: Report: Facebook Agrees to Independent Audit After Admitting It Screwed Up Its Metrics. “Facebook has agreed to an audit by the Media Rating Council after a string of admissions by the company that some of the metrics it provided to advertisers weren’t accurate, the Wall Street Journal reports.”

USEFUL STUFF

MakeUseOf: Use This Tool to Make 2D Pixel Sprites Online for Free . “Video game sprites are a special kind of art. Once the only way to represent game characters in retro titles due to hardware limitations, pixel graphics have made a huge comeback thanks to the indie gaming scene.”

What a great roundup! From WPTV: 7 museums that offer virtual tours. “If you don’t have the time or money to travel, have we got news: You can take a free, virtual tour of many of the best museums around the world, from Europe to Washington, D.C. All you need is your computer (and maybe a book about art history) to get started.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

TechCrunch: Snapchat pushes original, unscripted Shows with new A+E Networks deal. “Snapchat announced a new content partnership with A+E Networks, to develop what will be the very first unscripted (reality TV) drama series for Snapchat Shows. ‘Second Chance’ — as the show will be called — sounds like pure melodrama. ” So instead of soap operas we’re getting Snap operas?

SECURITY/LEGAL ISSUES

Google had a big ad screwup. From ZDNet: Google let scammers post a perfectly spoofed Amazon ad in its search results. “Anyone who used Google search to look for Amazon, the internet retail giant, on Wednesday was likely served a malicious ad — and didn’t even realize it. The good news is that unlike other rogue ads, your machine wasn’t infected or served malware in any way. But anyone who clicked on it would not have been sent to Amazon.com as they would have hoped, but instead, they were pointed to a fake Windows support scam posing as Microsoft.” Remember when Yahoo was the top search engine, then it started looking at other things, then its search engine and directory experience went to junk, then….

TorrentFreak: Search Engines & Copyright Holders Ready Voluntary Anti-Piracy Code. “Google and other search companies are close to striking a voluntary agreement with entertainment companies to tackle the appearance of infringing content links in search results. Following roundtable discussions chaired by the UK’s Intellectual Property Office, all parties have agreed that the code should take effect by June 1, 2017.”

RESEARCH AND OPINION

Neowin: Microsoft aims to expand trial that found OneNote can improve learning for dyslexic students. “The British Dyslexia Association (BDA) carried out a limited, small-scale trial at Knowl Hill School in Surrey, England to explore the use of OneNote in assisting students with different learning abilities. The 11-week trial program found that OneNote’s Immersive Reader, which can read out text shown on screen – including the student’s own writing – had a significant and positive effect on the learning experience.”

TNW: Study: No one really likes to look at your selfies. “Two researchers in Munich have found evidence to suggest that, ironically, no one actually wants to look at your ironic selfie. Sarah Diefenback and Lara Christoforakos of Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich published a paper in Frontiers in Psychology in January, titled ‘The Selfie Paradox: Nobody Seems to Like Them Yet Everyone Has Reasons to Take Them.'” Good morning, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!